Understanding Italian Flour Proteins and W Factors

Ask Chef Leo
17 Jan 201824:18

Summary

TLDRIn this informative session, Leo Spaziani explores the intricacies of Italian flours, focusing on protein content and the 'W' factor, which indicates gluten strength and affects fermentation and oven spring. He discusses various types of Caputo flours, including Pizza Napoletana, Tipo 00, and the stronger Auto Oro and Superior varieties, emphasizing how these factors influence pizza and bread quality. Leo also touches on the use of different yeasts for enhancing the baking process and achieving desirable textures and flavors in the final product.

Takeaways

  • 🍕 Understanding Italian flours and their protein content is crucial for making authentic pizzas and bread.
  • 🥟 The protein level of flour, specifically the glutenin and gliadin proteins, affects the dough's strength, elasticity, and fermentation capabilities.
  • 💧 Hydration level in dough is important and works in conjunction with protein levels to create the desired texture and structure.
  • 🔥 Oven spring is a phenomenon where steam from the dough's moisture helps create air pockets and a crispy crust in a hot oven.
  • 📈 The W factor (gluten strength) is a key measurement for flour that indicates how much water it can absorb and its fermentation potential.
  • 🌾 Different types of flour, such as Tipo 00 and Pizza Napoletana, have distinct protein levels and W factors, suitable for various pizza styles and baking techniques.
  • 🧪 Gluten formation is a chemical reaction between water and flour, involving both soluble and non-soluble proteins.
  • 🥖 Long fermentation times can develop complex flavors and require stronger flours with higher W factors.
  • 🛠 Adjusting water content and fermentation times based on flour's protein level and W factor is essential for achieving the desired dough characteristics.
  • 📦 Using dry yeast or instant yeast can help control fermentation and enhance the dough's rise and flavor development.

Q & A

  • What is the primary focus of the discussion in the script?

    -The primary focus of the discussion is on Italian flours, specifically the protein content and the concept of 'W' factor in determining the appropriate flour for pizza or bread making.

  • What is the significance of protein levels in flour?

    -Protein levels in flour are significant as they determine the strength and elasticity of the dough. Higher protein content generally results in a stronger dough, which can affect the texture and quality of the final baked product.

  • What is the 'W' factor in flour and how does it relate to pizza making?

    -The 'W' factor refers to the gluten strength of the flour, which is measured using a Shofar Albia graph machine. It indicates how much water can be absorbed and how well the flour can hold air, affecting the oven spring and the final texture of the pizza.

  • What is the ideal protein level for Neapolitan pizza flour?

    -The ideal protein level for Neapolitan pizza flour is around 11.5%, which is considered a weaker protein level but is suitable for the high hydration and quick cooking method characteristic of Neapolitan pizzas.

  • How does the hydration level of dough affect pizza making?

    -The hydration level of dough, which refers to the amount of water in the dough, affects the dough's elasticity and the oven spring. Higher hydration levels can lead to a more tender and airy crust, but may also require stronger flour with a higher 'W' factor to maintain structure during baking.

  • What is the difference between 'Tipo Uno' and 'Superiore' flour mentioned in the script?

    -Both 'Tipo Uno' and 'Superiore' are types of Italian flour, with 'Tipo Uno' having a protein level of 13% and a 'W' factor of 300, while 'Superiore' has a protein level of 13% and a 'W' factor of 330. The difference lies in their water absorption capacity and gluten strength, with 'Superiore' being able to handle more water and fermentation due to its higher 'W' factor.

  • Why is understanding the 'W' factor important for bread and pizza makers?

    -Understanding the 'W' factor is important for bread and pizza makers because it helps determine the hydration level, fermentation time, and the potential oven spring of the dough. This knowledge allows for better control over the texture, flavor, and overall quality of the final product.

  • What are the effects of long fermentation on dough?

    -Long fermentation breaks down the starches in the dough, creating complex flavors and a lighter, airier texture. It also allows for the development of a strong gluten network, which can handle the expansion of carbon dioxide produced by yeast, resulting in a well-structured final product with good cell structure.

  • How does the method of grinding affect the characteristics of the flour?

    -The method of grinding affects the characteristics of the flour by determining the amount of bran and other parts of the grain that are incorporated into the flour. A coarser grind, like 'Tipo Uno', includes more of the grain's exterior, while a finer grind results in a more refined flour with different baking properties.

  • What are the benefits of using dry yeast or instant yeast in dough making?

    -Using dry yeast or instant yeast in dough making provides a head start in breaking down starches due to the yeast's fermenting action. This can naturally raise the pH level of the dough and contribute to a better rise and improved texture in the final product.

  • What advice does the speaker give for those looking to improve their pizza or bread making skills?

    -The speaker advises understanding the protein levels and 'W' factors of different flours, experimenting with hydration levels and fermentation times, and being aware of how these factors affect the dough's structure and the final product's texture and flavor.

Outlines

00:00

🍕 Introduction to Italian Flours and Proteins

The video begins with the host, Leo, welcoming viewers to his show focused on Italian flours, specifically discussing proteins and the 'W' factor in flour. Leo intends to explain the different protein levels in various types of flour and how they affect pizza and bread making. He uses 'glitch' and 'Joanie' flours as examples to illustrate his points and promises a chemistry lesson to help viewers understand the role of proteins and starches in flour selection for baking.

05:01

🥟 Understanding Gluten and Flour Strength

Leo delves deeper into the science of gluten formation in flour, explaining the role of proteins like glutenin and gliadin in providing dough elasticity and tenacity. He discusses oven spring, the effect of steam from moisture in the dough, and how it contributes to the final texture of the baked product. Leo also introduces the 'W' factor, a measure of gluten strength, and explains its significance in determining the fermentation potential and the resulting characteristics of the dough.

10:02

🌾 Types of Flour and Their Characteristics

The host continues by describing different types of flour, including the 'Joanie Pizza Napoletana' and 'Tipo Uno' flours, and their respective protein content and W factors. He explains how the milling process affects the final product, with 'Tipo Uno' being a less refined, higher protein flour suitable for longer fermentation times and creating a strong gluten network. Leo emphasizes the importance of understanding the W factor and protein levels for achieving the desired texture and flavor in pizza and bread.

15:03

🕒 Long Fermentation and Bulk Fermentation Techniques

Leo discusses long fermentation processes, explaining how they affect the dough's flavor and texture. He talks about the practice of degassing and bulk fermentation, and how these techniques can influence the dough's pH level and its ability to retain structure during baking. The host also touches on the use of different types of yeast, such as instant yeast and dry mother yeast, and their impact on the fermentation process and the final product's characteristics.

20:03

📚 Conclusion and Additional Resources

In the final part, Leo wraps up his discussion on Italian flours, proteins, and the 'W' factor. He encourages viewers to experiment with different flour types and fermentation techniques to achieve their desired pizza or bread qualities. He also invites viewers to reach out to him through his website, social media, and YouTube channel for more information and to engage further with the pizza-making community.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Italian flours

Italian flours refer to the various types of flour that are commonly used in Italian cuisine, particularly for making pizza and bread. In the context of the video, the host discusses different protein levels and flour strengths, emphasizing how these factors influence the quality and characteristics of the final baked product. For example, the Napolitana flour is specifically designed for authentic Neapolitan pizza, with a protein level of 11.5%, which is considered weaker but suitable for its intended use due to the high hydration and quick cooking method.

💡Proteins

Proteins in flour are crucial for the structure and texture of baked goods. They include both soluble and non-soluble types, with the non-soluble proteins (glutenin and gliadin) being particularly important for gluten formation. The video explains that gluten provides elasticity and tenacity to the dough, allowing it to stretch and hold air, which contributes to the oven spring effect. The protein content varies among different flours and affects how the dough behaves during mixing, fermentation, and baking.

💡Starch

Starch is a complex carbohydrate found in flour, which is broken down into simpler sugars during fermentation. These sugars are then consumed by yeast, producing carbon dioxide and alcohol, which contribute to the leavening and flavor development of the dough. Starch plays a significant role in the final texture and taste of the baked goods.

💡Oven spring

Oven spring refers to the rapid rise and expansion of dough during baking due to the steam generated from the moisture in the dough. This process creates a light, airy texture with a desirable crust structure. The video emphasizes that oven spring is influenced by the protein level and hydration of the flour, with weaker flours like the Napolitana being suitable for high hydration and quick cooking to achieve the desired oven spring.

💡W factor

The W factor, or farinograph absorption number, is a measure of the water absorption capacity of flour, which is indicative of the flour's gluten strength. A higher W factor means the flour can absorb more water, resulting in a stronger gluten network and better oven spring. The W factor is crucial for determining the appropriate fermentation time and hydration levels for the dough.

💡Fermentation

Fermentation is the process where yeast consumes sugars, producing carbon dioxide and alcohol, which causes the dough to rise and develop flavor. The video explains that the protein content and W factor of the flour influence the fermentation process, with stronger flours allowing for longer fermentation times and more complex flavors.

💡Hydration

Hydration refers to the amount of water added to the flour when mixing dough. High hydration doughs are wetter and can benefit from the oven spring effect, while lower hydration doughs may require stronger flours to maintain structure. The video emphasizes that understanding hydration is essential for achieving the desired texture and crust characteristics in pizza and bread.

💡Gluten network

The gluten network is the elastic structure formed by the proteins glutenin and gliadin when water is added to flour. This network provides the dough with its stretchability and strength, allowing it to hold gases produced during fermentation and oven spring. The gluten network is crucial for the final volume, texture, and shape of the baked goods.

💡Yeast

Yeast is a microorganism used in baking to leaven the dough and contribute to flavor development. It consumes sugars and produces carbon dioxide and alcohol, causing the dough to rise. The video explains that different types of yeast, such as instant yeast and dry active yeast, can be used in various flours to achieve different fermentation times and flavor profiles.

💡Dough handling

Dough handling refers to the techniques used during the preparation and fermentation of dough, such as stretching, folding, and refrigeration. Proper handling is essential for developing the gluten network, controlling fermentation, and achieving the desired texture and flavor in the final product. The video discusses how different flours require specific handling techniques based on their protein content and W factor.

Highlights

Leo Spazzano discusses Italian flours and protein content in relation to pizza and bread making.

The importance of understanding protein levels and starches in flour for determining its use in pizza or bread.

The specific focus on 'glitch' in Questa Joanie flour lineup and its varying protein levels.

The historical context of Neapolitan pizza and its development 300 years ago.

The protein level of 11.5% in Napolitana flour and its significance in dough strength.

The concept of oven spring and its role in pizza dough cooking.

The transformation of sugars in flour and the role of yeast in fermentation.

The four different proteins in dough making and their impact on gluten formation.

The importance of glutenin and gliadin proteins for dough elasticity and tenacity.

The W factor in flour and its relation to gluten strength and dough fermentation capabilities.

The difference between Tipo Uno and double zero flours in terms of grind and protein content.

The significance of the W factor in determining dough hydration and fermentation time.

The role of long fermentation in developing complex flavors and the dough's texture.

The use of different yeast products like instant yeast and natural yeast for enhancing dough fermentation.

The impact of fermentation on pH level and the resulting texture and flavor of the final product.

The advice for pizza enthusiasts to experiment with different flours and yeast products for improved pizza making.

Transcripts

play00:00

hi everybody welcome to another edition

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of ask leo pizza

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I'm your host Leo spazzy and today what

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I want to do is talk about Italian

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flours and specifically talk about

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proteins and something that's called a W

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what I want to do today is I'm going to

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show you some of the lineup at 'glitch

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in questa Joanie and use these as a

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basis of different protein levels

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different strengths of flour and I want

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to give you a bit of a chemistry lesson

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here so that everybody can understand

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what exactly it means to talk about

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proteins and starches and all these

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different things that are involved when

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determining the proper flour to use for

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your pizzas or bread okay what you're

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gonna learn today from me can also be

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taken not only with the Cinque was that

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Joanie line but you can use this

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information in general when talking

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about any different type of flour that's

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on the market so that you'll know what

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the difference between the different

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protein amounts there are and again how

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to decide how to best use that flour the

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first thing I want to do is talk about

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the different types of flours that we

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have here and then I want to go into a

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little bit more in depth and talk about

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the proteins in the strength okay the

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first one I want to show you is this

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chick with the Joanie Pizza Napoletana

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flour okay this napolitana flour was

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created specifically to make the

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authentic Neapolitan pizza okay you got

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to remember that 300 years ago when this

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product was developed or when they first

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documented the first Neapolitan pizzas

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there wasn't a lot of technology around

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okay so the dough's that you made in

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your pizzeria 300 years ago would have

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sat out ambiently

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may be at room temperature and then once

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they were used what so they they were

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ready they were used basically right out

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of the box stretched out and put

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directly into a very hot oven okay so

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that being said the protein level on

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this flour in particular is 11 for an

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eleven and a half percent protein okay

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now eleven and a half percent protein

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sounds it gets a little bit weak okay

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but realist

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what we're talking about doing is

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playing off of two different principles

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here you have something in napolitana

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pizza where you're using a little bit

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higher hydration your dole hydration

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being the amount of water that's in your

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dole formula okay and is that water is

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inside of this doll okay

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it goes into a very hot oven typically

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Neapolitan pizza is cooked anywhere

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between 850 to 900 degrees some guys go

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a little bit hotter and again you hear

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the classic moderate margherita pizza

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referred to all the time as a 90 second

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pizza depending on the oven temperature

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you'll see that come down to even 70

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seconds okay so it's pretty quick so

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because you have this dough that might

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be a little bit wet it's never been in

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refrigeration so it's a little bit

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looser okay you don't need a very strong

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flour and you don't need a very high

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level of yeast to get that to pop in the

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oven okay pop beating that the crust is

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gonna rise very nicely it's gonna be

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very well baked through okay what's

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happening is we refer to this as oven

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spring in the oven so what's happening

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is the water that's inside the dome once

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it goes into that hot oven is gonna be

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released this steam that steam is gonna

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push out okay from inside the dough and

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it's gonna it's gonna get trapped inside

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of the structure of the dough itself

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okay that structure is called the gluten

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nut now the gluten that is really

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important to understand and how it

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relates to proteins because as soon as

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water touches flour okay there's a

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there's a transformation that happens

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okay so what's happening is you have

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proteins and you have sugars

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okay now sugars get broken down into

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complex and ship simple sugars the

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complex ones being starches okay and and

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then they break down into simple sugars

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that week and without going into a big

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science lesson again get to get used up

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by the dough and that's what aids in

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fermentation that's what the yeast

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yeast itself will eat and allow it to

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grow okay

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the proteins okay there's four different

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proteins in dough making we're concerned

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about - okay

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so you have soluble and non soluble

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proteins okay

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the non soluble ones in particular are

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the ones that are referring directly to

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the gluten formation of the dough or

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this gluten nap okay the to prayer of

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the two proteins are called glutenin and

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gliadin okay glutamine is what gives the

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dough itself its strengths okay its

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elasticity so if you ever seen a guy

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take a dough ball stretch it out and

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then start pulling it and throw it in

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the air okay the dough has been very

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well developed okay

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and the ability that it's not gonna it's

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going to stretch and not rip okay is

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part of this protein from the the gluten

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glia Deen is what we call the agent that

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gives it its tenacity what allow it to

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stretch and stretch and then not drink

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so they get strength okay so these two

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factors inside of the dough itself okay

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are a big player in this gluten nut now

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when I talk about oven spring and I

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talked about the the moisture that steam

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inside of the dough puffing up the dough

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ball and then all of a sudden you lock

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it because what's happening is the dough

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is getting cooked and it's got nowhere

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to go so whenever you go on Facebook or

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you see all these Pizza aioli out there

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showing pictures of the edge of the

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corner Tony you see them showing looks

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like almost like a spider web well

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you're really seeing there is that

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gluten nut and the development and if

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it's properly developed that's when you

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get those beautiful air pockets and the

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final product that you get out of that

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is very light airy crispy that sort of

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thing okay now the chick was there

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Joanie Pizza Napoletana flour like I

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said is 11 and a half percent protein

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but it has a W factor of 300 well what

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the heck is a W I get this question all

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the time there's been some guys doing

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videos out there that have actually

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talked a little bit about W but they

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never really got into

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what a W factor really is okay so going

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back into the technical portion of how

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dull or I'm sorry how flower is actually

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Milt okay they use a machine called a

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Shope in albia graph very technical

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machine it's actually a really cool

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machine and if you ever went to see the

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mill at Abu jahil fenya in in Venice

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Italy

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they're the producers of the Lachie

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questa Joanie flour they actually have a

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very state-of-the-art lab with one of

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these LVO graphs in it what they do is

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the scientists are the technicians

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inside of this lab after they take the

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the grains and they grind them down into

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flour they take a sample of that and

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they test the gluten strength okay what

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they do is they actually make a little

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portion of dough there's actually a

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control dole formula that's used so they

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know how much water based on how much

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flour is used okay

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they make this dough they put it inside

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the machine okay and then what the

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Machine does it takes that little bit of

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dome and it puffs it up in toward into a

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bubble okay and what the machine does is

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it actually tests the strength of that

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bubble and how much pressure can go

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inside of the bubble until it bursts

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okay and that's how they come up with a

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W number okay so now the W factor on

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this napolitana flour is 300 why is that

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important an important number to know

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the reason it's important is because

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this is what's gonna fit you allow you

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to figure out how the dough can be

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created how much fermentation can be put

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into that don't meaning how long that

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dough can sit out without it blowing or

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deflating on itself okay and as you talk

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about the different lines a w of 300

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even though we're talking about a weaker

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flower here let's say for example this

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this is 11 a half percent for protein we

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can look at this with a Joanie

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tipo uno okay this is a flower that's

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much innothing pietre okay which means

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that it's

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ground now again in Italy if you were to

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go visit the avocado Fenian mill and

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look at the way that they produce this

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with the Johnny tipo Oona flower

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okay all of these flowers are considered

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double zero okay double zero refers to

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the grind okay so when the flaw when the

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grain actually goes into the mill it

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gets sucked in through a series of

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vacuums it starts let's say on the

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fourth floor of the building for example

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at that point the the grain itself gets

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cleaned okay they add humidity or steam

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into that so they can separate the grain

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into its key parts okay once the grain

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is separated into its key parts okay the

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the the let's say the grains are sifted

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so all those are broken and then they

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start to get ground okay the the highest

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or the most open setting that that's

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that that grinding begins at okay would

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be at let's say a one or even two okay

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being the thickest courses grind

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okay now tipo uno refers to the number

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one setting okay

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they're still using the same process

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that they used you know the many many

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years ago to grind this except that

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what's happening now is used to be back

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in the day a flour mill would be

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connected to some sort of river or

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flowing body of water okay on the

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outside there would be this wheel that

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would go in the water and it would

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constantly spin with the force of the

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current of the river or body of water

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that's flowing again remembering that

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there was no electricity or technology

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back in the day this spinning wheel

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would be hooked up to a series of gears

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okay and sprockets that would be hooked

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up to these stone plates okay these are

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granite stones okay and again the

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technology that they're using today is

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very similar to what they used many many

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years ago these granite stones are

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crushing the grain and they're grinding

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until they reach this number one setting

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okay now a number one setting won't

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refine the flour as much as

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when you get down into the zip double

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zero characteristics but as it's

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grinding okay some of the exterior of

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the of the grain the brand if you will

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like the husk actually gets added

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incorporated into the flour itself so in

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Italy you would hear this referred to

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sometimes as let's say half wheat you

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sure you're familiar with whole wheat

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flour okay whole wheat flour has all of

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the wheat grain inside of it now this is

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partially refined so you do have some of

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the grain in there that again is still

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reminiscent of that whole grain but it's

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more refined up until that number one

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setting having that number one setting

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in there and my point to this whole

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thing is that this flower has a protein

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level of 13% but it has a W factor of

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300% so you're asking yourself how could

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this have the same W of 300 as this has

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the same value of 300 but the protein

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level is 11 and a half and the protein

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level is 13 on here again it comes down

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to the amount of water that can be

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absorbed the amount of gluten that's

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inside of that flour and its ability to

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stretch and hold that air so that when

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it goes into the oven you've got that

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nice strong gluten Network and it won't

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deflate on top of itself

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okay so again I know a lot of people

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especially in the United States are all

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hung up on the protein level of the

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flour but if you're gonna take your

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pizza-making or your bread making to the

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next level it's really important to

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start to understand what this exact W

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factor is okay I want to talk about two

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other flours that are stronger now these

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are double zero flour this red bag the

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one with the red writing this is called

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Auto Oro okay or gold in English if

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you're buying Ching crystal Johnny flour

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you can either ask for it in auto or

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gold it's the same exact thing just

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depending on how it's referred to in

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Italy it's referred to auto in the

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United States it's referred to as gold

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now you also have the blue writing okay

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the

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blue writing in Italy is referred to as

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superiority or in English superior

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what's the difference the superior is a

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protein level of 13% the oral or gold is

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a protein level of 14% now here's the

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big difference the superior flower has a

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W number of 330 where the oral has a W

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number of 390 so even though the protein

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is very close

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okay thirteen and fourteen percent is

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considered very close the W number is

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very different now why is this very

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important so as we begin to talk about

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long fermented dose those that are going

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to be created today balled-up put into

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refrigeration and not used for let's say

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48 to 72 hours okay when we talk about

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the proteins and starches and that sort

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of thing that's inside the flour and how

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the actual flour is broken down in dough

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making process okay a heavier flour like

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this will allow you to use more water it

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will allow you to ferment for a longer

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time fermenting for a longer longer time

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is going to give you more complex

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flavors okay in the actual dough not

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only is it going to give you more

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complex flavors okay it's also going to

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give it at the door chance because of

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the yeast activity it's going to allow

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that that co2 that's released as the

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yeast that's eating the the sugars

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inside this dome as it eats that that

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yeast culture basically fills up imagine

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drinking a can of soda you get filled up

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with air and then it lets out of burp

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okay so in that process of burping if

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you will it's releasing carbon dioxide

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inside of itself okay now most guys that

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do let's say a 48 to 72 hour long

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fermented dough and cold refrigeration

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well they'll usually do at some point is

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do what's called degassing the dal or

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booking booking meaning that they take

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this batch of dough they'll fold it on

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top of itself a few times before they

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may actually make their dough balls okay

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this is called bulk fermentation in a

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process you got this big batch of dough

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that's made you put it in a lexington

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tainer

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you stick it in the cooler for 24 hours

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after 24 hours you're booked and folded

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a couple times get some of that extra

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gas out of it you that that that carbon

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dioxide is in is in there what it does

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is it raises the pH level the acidity of

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the dough itself okay so as this raises

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up you got that acidic dough now that

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carbon dioxide actually turns into

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almost like toxic sludge if you will

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after a while that it's in there it'll

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actually break down the dough at a very

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fast rate so at some point if you are

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working or you're going to start playing

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around with long fermented dough's

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you're going to start experimenting with

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two things bulk fermentation you're

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gonna die gas your dough and then

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finally you're gonna figure out where

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the sweet spot is of your dough so that

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you can make these dough balls put them

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away in your dough boxes and then let's

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say another 24 to 48 hours you would

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pull them out stretch out your dough and

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make your pizzas the last thing I'm

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going to talk about with these is that a

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W level of 390 this is a great dole I'm

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great flour to use for a dull that's

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gonna be long fermented with a lot of

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water okay

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typically you might see a let's say a

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Sicilian pan pizza with a very high

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hydration level a lot of water in it

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used with this flour but the

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understanding being that you can use a

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lot more water because it has a lot of

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water absorbing properties but once you

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actually make this doll you let the

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dough sit for a while that absorbs all

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that water okay now you've got a dough

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that's very strong so as you go to

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stretch it in the pan okay

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what's gonna happen is you've got a lot

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more opportunity to let this dough rise

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and open up and get all those beautiful

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pockets which they refer to as cell

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structure okay now that cell structure

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again talking about all my friends on

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Facebook and Instagram that put these

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pictures with these pizza crusts that

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have these giant holes or air pockets in

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it that's how they did it so you've got

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a flower that will absorb a lot of water

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okay

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you've got a W factor of let's say

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390 and now you're able to ferment for

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48 to 72 hours breaking down the

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starches inside the dull and the final

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product is something that's very light

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and crispy it's really special and

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especially after 48 to 72 hours that

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you've been both fermenting you're

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getting these flavors now that are built

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up kind of like some good sourdough if

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you will you get almost like this

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nuttiness this little acidity in there

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but it's great the thing that's really

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great about the superior okay even

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though this is 13% compared to 14% here

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this has a w level of 330 now it's a

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little bit less protein if you were

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gonna make let's say a classic Italian

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woodfired pizza or a classic Italian

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pizza made in electric oven or a gas

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oven okay this will allow you not to

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need to do that fermentation stop of

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let's say 48 to 72 hours this is a dough

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that within 24 to 48 hours you can build

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up those characteristics it'll still

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have enough strength that you're gonna

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get those fermentation qualities of

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flavor it's still gonna have enough

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strength so that once it puffs up in the

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oven

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it won't deflate on itself so that cell

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structure again if the flour is too weak

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what's gonna happen is it'll pop and

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then it'll fall flat and it'll look kind

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of gummy in the middle if you try doing

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the same thing with let's say this

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napolitana flour at 11 and 1/2 protein

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with with a W factor of 300 now this

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will make a very good dough if you treat

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it properly handle it properly you can

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put this into refrigeration and make a

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beautiful dough on use it in 48 hours

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but what's gonna happen is you're gonna

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have to make some adjustments in water

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and your process because what will

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happen because it's a little bit weaker

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it'll puff up and then if it's got too

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much water in there it won't have enough

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strength to maintain that structure and

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what will happen is it'll start to

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collapse on itself a little bit alright

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that's not a good thing so here's four

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very different types of flour with four

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different types of protein but again I

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want to focus on the most important

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thing here the strength of the actual

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flower itself and

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the W number means in all of these okay

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one last thing I want to talk about

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chief was the Joanie also makes a full

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line of different types of flour in the

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lineup they have simulated marginata

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which is your similar durum flour ground

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to very fine consistency okay

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so they called grano duro okay your dura

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then they also have their own instant

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yeast

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this is brewers yeast this is made from

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this the the beer making process okay

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this is instant yeast it's actually very

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strong this is a really good product to

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use and again this is something that's

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all over the place they're using they're

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doing a lot of the sections really nice

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then they have this other product called

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nature crafts okay nature crafts leave

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DiMaggio a chute though okay so this is

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a dry mother yeast okay that has been

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fermented and then once it's fermented

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it's allowed to dry out and then they

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grind it okay so what you have is this

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mother yeast that's you know been

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fermented it's been refreshed a few

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times meaning that they've taken a

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portion of the actual culture this

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starter that they've made the mother

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they've pulled it out refreshed it by

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adding a little bit more flour and water

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so that it's got something to eat on

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again it's breaking it down it's living

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its breathing it's doing its thing and

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then as they do this they pull a little

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bit of flour I'm sorry go out and they

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keep refreshing this until they get to a

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certain pH level pH again like I just

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described in fermentation is very

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important because this allows you to

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give your dull a head start as far as

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breaking down those starches okay so

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you're able to use a product like this

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in the dough itself which will naturally

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raise up the pH level okay and then in a

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flour for example like this superior

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that's kind of middle-of-the-road it's

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that's not the strongest in the line

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it's not the weakest but it's kind of

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middle-of-the-road

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with a high your W number you're able to

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get some of those really long

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fermentation notes in a shorter period

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of time and usage on this is actually

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pretty low you might use let's say maybe

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thirty to fifty grams

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for every let's say liter of water that

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you use okay so I know in the United

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States you know we we get hung up with

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you know flower weight and bakers

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percentage in this sort of thing but a

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product like this was developed by using

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and figuring out how much water is

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actually going in because again that's

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how how the the the gluten network is

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obviously you're gonna work how its

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gonna support the structure of the dough

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itself and then finally get broken down

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by a product like this so that you can

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get that light airy crispy texture out

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of the oven without a really long

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fermentation time okay so I hope this

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answers a lot of questions I've recently

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gotten a lot of calls and a lot of

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emails honestly Oh Pizza about this

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subject particularly I hope this does

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answer your questions and if you want to

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get into this more in depth with me

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please feel free to visit my website

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which is www.hyken.com is airy you can

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find me on Instagram and ask leo pizza

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you could find me on twitter under ask

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leo pizza and you could also check out

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my youtube channel on there chef leo

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spazzy reen for more videos and more of

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this great information I hope

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everybody's having a great time I hope

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you're making a lot of pizzas and baking

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and as far as I'm concerned I hope

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everybody is gonna have a great future

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and making some great those make some

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great pizzas and again support this

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great pizza industry that we're involved

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in thank you very much everybody for

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listening and I hope you have a great

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day bye bye

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Related Tags
ItalianFloursPizzaMakingProteinContentGlutenStrengthWFactorNapoletanaFlourTipoUnoAutoOroSuperioreBakingTips