How to Write a Short Film

Tyler Mowery
24 Nov 202016:58

Summary

TLDRThis video delves into the intricacies of screenwriting and storytelling, focusing on crafting a short film with a strong dramatic narrative. It emphasizes the importance of establishing a philosophical conflict, attaching beliefs to characters, and utilizing a structured approach like Dan Harmon's Story Circle to create a compelling story with momentum. The video also addresses common misconceptions about writing and encourages new writers to learn the fundamentals before attempting to break rules.

Takeaways

  • 📝 Start by understanding the fundamentals of screenwriting and storytelling, such as conflict, character structure, and dialogue.
  • 🎬 Transition from theory to practice by writing a short script, applying the learned concepts.
  • 💡 Focus on creating a strong, dramatic narrative for your short film, using detailed and specific elements.
  • 🚫 Don't get caught up in exceptions or rule-breaking; as a new writer, mastering the basics is crucial.
  • 📺 Use existing narratives, like the main plot of a 'Rick and Morty' episode, as examples for learning purposes.
  • 🎯 Identify and build upon the philosophical conflict within your story, establishing a viewpoint versus viewpoint dynamic.
  • 👥 Attach distinct philosophical beliefs to your characters, which will drive their actions and conflicts.
  • 🏁 Follow a structured approach like Dan Harmon's Story Circle to build narrative momentum and character development.
  • 🔄 Understand that philosophical conflicts and character beliefs should be reflected in their actions and decisions throughout the story.
  • 📉 Recognize the importance of story structure in short scripts, just as in feature-length screenplays.
  • ✍️ Don't let procrastination or the need for perfection delay the writing process; focus on learning through writing.

Q & A

  • What is the main focus of the 12th video in this series?

    -The main focus of the 12th video is to provide practical guidance on how to write a short film with a strong dramatic narrative, by going granular into the process and using Rick and Morty episode 202 as an example.

  • Why does the video use Rick and Morty episode 202 as an example instead of a short film?

    -The video uses Rick and Morty episode 202 because most short films are not well-written narrative dramas and are often more focused on concepts, experiments, or used as part of a director's reel. Rick and Morty's episode provides a clear narrative structure that is similar in length to a short film, making it a useful example.

  • What is the significance of philosophical conflict in storytelling?

    -Philosophical conflict is significant in storytelling because it represents the differing moral, ethical, or philosophical beliefs within the story. It forms the backbone of the narrative and drives the events and character actions, creating a viewpoint versus viewpoint dilemma that engages the audience.

  • How does the video suggest a new writer should approach the writing process?

    -The video suggests that new writers should focus on learning the principles of storytelling rather than trying to break the rules. It encourages writers to immerse themselves in storytelling through reading novels and watching films to naturally generate story ideas.

  • What are the key components of a narrative drama according to the video?

    -The key components of a narrative drama are a clear philosophical conflict, characters with distinct beliefs that drive their actions, and a structured narrative that builds momentum through the characters' decisions and the consequences of those decisions.

  • How does the video advise writers to handle the structure of their short script?

    -The video advises writers to use Dan Harmon's Story Circle as a versatile and organic way to structure their story, emphasizing that story structure is just as important in a short script as it is in a feature-length screenplay.

  • What is the philosophical conflict in Rick and Morty episode 202?

    -The philosophical conflict in Rick and Morty episode 202 revolves around absolute morality versus moral relativism. Morty believes in an absolute morality where selling a weapon to an assassin is wrong, while Rick believes in moral relativism, thinking he can define his own morality and there's no objective wrong in his actions.

  • How do secondary characters like K Michael and Fart contribute to the philosophical conflict in the episode?

    -Secondary characters like K Michael and Fart contribute to the philosophical conflict by embodying certain beliefs and forcing the main characters, like Morty, to make choices based on their own philosophical viewpoints. Their actions and interactions with the main characters play out the philosophical conflict and challenge the audience's beliefs.

  • What is the narrative climax of the episode and what does it represent?

    -The narrative climax of the episode occurs when Morty realizes that his action of saving Fart leads to the potential destruction of the universe. Morty ultimately kills Fart, representing a philosophical change where he understands that doing the right thing is more complex than he initially thought. The story makes a philosophical statement that moral decisions are not always clear-cut.

  • How does the video address the concern that following the provided guidance might be too formulaic?

    -The video acknowledges that some writers might find the guidance too formulaic, but it emphasizes that as new writers, it's important to first learn the principles and fundamentals of storytelling. Breaking rules comes after understanding them, and the provided guidance is meant to offer a solid foundation for new writers to start with.

  • What advice does the video give regarding the writing process for a short script?

    -The video advises not to spend more than a day or two on outlining the short script and not to be overly precious about it. It encourages writers to resist procrastination, to stop searching for more answers, and to simply start writing, emphasizing that learning takes time and practice.

Outlines

00:00

📝 Introduction to Screenwriting and Storytelling

This paragraph introduces the 12th video in a series focused on the fundamentals of screenwriting and storytelling. It encourages viewers to watch the rest of the videos for a comprehensive understanding. The speaker emphasizes the importance of moving from learning theory to practical application, suggesting that the video will provide a granular, detailed guide on writing a short film for the first time. The speaker also addresses potential criticisms about adhering to formulaic structures and reassures viewers that the purpose is to provide a solid foundation for new writers. Additionally, the speaker explains the choice to use a 'Rick and Morty' episode as a case study instead of a traditional short film, citing the prevalence of poorly written short films and recommending a website for professionally made short films.

05:00

🎭 Establishing Philosophical Conflict in Storytelling

This paragraph delves into the concept of philosophical conflict as a crucial element in storytelling. It defines philosophical conflict as the clash of different moral, ethical, or philosophical beliefs within a story. The speaker uses the 'Rick and Morty' episode as an example to illustrate how the characters' differing viewpoints on morality create a clear philosophical conflict. The paragraph explains that attaching specific beliefs to characters leads to conflict and engages the audience in the moral dilemma. It also introduces secondary characters and their roles in the philosophical conflict, emphasizing how their beliefs and actions contribute to the narrative.

10:02

📈 Structuring Short Scripts with Narrative Drive

This paragraph discusses the importance of story structure in short scripts, refuting the notion that structure becomes irrelevant in short films. It introduces Dan Harmon's Story Circle as an effective method for structuring a short script, highlighting its versatility and applicability to various lengths of narrative. The speaker analyzes the 'Rick and Morty' episode through the lens of the Story Circle, demonstrating how the characters' actions are motivated by their beliefs and how these actions propel the story forward. The paragraph emphasizes the significance of narrative momentum and character-driven actions, providing a clear framework for writers to follow when crafting their short scripts.

15:02

✍️ Overcoming Procrastination and Writing the Short Script

In this final paragraph, the speaker addresses common pitfalls that new writers face, such as over-planning and procrastination. It advises against spending too much time on outlining and encourages writers to start writing without delay. The speaker emphasizes the importance of learning the principles of storytelling before attempting to break or bend them. The paragraph concludes by providing a blueprint for writing a short script, summarizing the key elements of philosophical conflict, character beliefs, and action-driven narratives. The speaker also promotes the next video in the series, which will focus on common mistakes in short script writing, and encourages viewers to engage with the content by liking and subscribing.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Screenwriting

Screenwriting refers to the art and craft of writing screenplays, which are the texts that serve as the blueprints for films or television episodes. In the context of this video, screenwriting is the central focus as it aims to teach viewers the fundamentals of crafting a compelling narrative for a short film, emphasizing the importance of understanding character structure, dialogue, and conflict.

💡Conflict

Conflict is a central element in storytelling, referring to the struggle between opposing forces that drives the narrative forward. In screenwriting, conflict can be internal (within a character) or external (between characters or between a character and their environment). The video emphasizes the importance of philosophical conflict, which involves differing moral or ethical beliefs, as a backbone of storytelling.

💡Character Structure

Character structure refers to the way a writer designs and develops characters in a narrative, including their motivations, goals, and arcs. It is crucial for creating engaging and believable characters that观众 can connect with and follow on their journey. The video highlights the need to attach specific beliefs to characters, which in turn define their actions and place them in conflict with others.

💡Dialogue

Dialogue is the conversational speech or exchange of words between characters in a screenplay. It serves to reveal character traits, advance the plot, and provide emotional depth. Effective dialogue is crucial for maintaining the audience's interest and making the story believable. The video touches on the importance of dialogue in conveying the philosophical conflict between characters.

💡Narrative Drama

Narrative drama is a form of storytelling that relies on a structured narrative to convey a dramatic sequence of events. It often involves a clear conflict, character development, and a resolution. The video provides a practical guide on how to write a short film with a strong dramatic narrative, emphasizing the importance of a clear philosophical conflict and character actions motivated by beliefs.

💡Philosophical Conflict

Philosophical conflict refers to the clash of differing philosophical, moral, or ethical beliefs within a story. It is a key component in creating a compelling narrative, as it drives the characters' actions and decisions, leading to dramatic tension. The video stresses the importance of establishing a clear philosophical conflict as the backbone of the story.

💡Story Circle

The Story Circle is a narrative structure developed by Dan Harmon that outlines eight steps to create a complete story arc. It is a versatile tool that can be applied to both feature-length screenplays and short scripts. The video uses the Story Circle to demonstrate how to structure a short film effectively, with each step corresponding to a key moment in the narrative.

💡Narrative Momentum

Narrative momentum refers to the forward movement or drive of a story, created by the characters' actions and decisions that arise from their beliefs and conflicts. It is what keeps the audience engaged and invested in the story. The video emphasizes the importance of building narrative momentum through character actions motivated by their philosophical beliefs.

💡Writing Process

The writing process involves the steps a writer takes to create a piece of writing, from initial idea generation to drafting, revising, and finalizing. The video advises new writers not to spend too much time on outlining and to focus on the act of writing itself, as learning occurs through the process of writing and revising.

💡Philosophical Beliefs

Philosophical beliefs are the fundamental convictions or principles that guide a person's or character's understanding of the world and their actions within it. These beliefs are central to the video's discussion on storytelling, as they form the basis of the philosophical conflict and influence the characters' decisions and actions.

Highlights

The video is the 12th in a series covering the fundamentals of screenwriting and storytelling.

The focus of the video is on writing a short film for the first time with a strong dramatic narrative.

The video emphasizes the importance of understanding conflict, character structure, and dialogue in screenwriting.

The creator discourages criticism that the methods discussed are too formulaic or restrictive for new writers.

Instead of using a short film, the video analyzes the main plot of Rick and Morty episode 202 as an example of a well-written narrative drama.

The video explains that many short films are not well-written narrative dramas and are often experimental or made for portfolios.

The importance of having a clear philosophical conflict is emphasized as the backbone of storytelling.

The philosophical conflict in Rick and Morty episode 202 is between absolute morality and moral relativism.

The video outlines how to attach beliefs to characters to create a viewpoint versus viewpoint conflict.

Secondary characters like Chromebopulus Michael and Fart are introduced to further the philosophical conflict and challenge Morty's beliefs.

The video advocates for using Dan Harmon's Story Circle for structuring short scripts as well as feature-length screenplays.

The narrative structure of the Rick and Morty episode is analyzed to fit within the Story Circle framework.

The video stresses that story structure is crucial in short scripts, contrary to the common belief that it can be ignored.

The actions of characters in the story should be motivated by their philosophical beliefs, creating narrative momentum.

The video advises new writers not to get caught up in the idea that they need to break the rules before they understand them.

Writers are encouraged to spend minimal time outlining and to focus on the act of writing rather than procrastinating.

The video concludes by promising a future episode on common short script mistakes to help writers improve their work.

Transcripts

play00:00

welcome to the 12th video in this series

play00:02

covering the fundamentals of

play00:03

screenwriting and storytelling

play00:05

if you'd like to watch the rest of the

play00:06

videos you can find them linked in the

play00:08

description

play00:09

or on the end screen of this video

play00:12

alright so you've learned the

play00:13

fundamentals you know about conflict

play00:15

character structure dialogue etc etc

play00:18

now it's time to sit down and get a

play00:20

short script down

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onto the page enough theory it's time to

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write

play00:25

in this video i will be going super

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granular and showing you how to write a

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short film for the first time

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this will be an extremely practical look

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at how to write a short film with a

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strong

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dramatic narrative i will be getting

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very detailed and specific in this video

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so that you can see the fundamentals of

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a narrative drama in action

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my hope is that this gives you a

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practical understanding so that you can

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begin to build your own short script

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and ultimately write your first feature

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length screenplay

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now before we get started i have two big

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notes note number one

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please don't spend time telling me that

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the ideas i talk about in this video

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are too formulaic or that i'm being too

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restrictive

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yes there is more than one way to tell a

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story

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yes it's easy to find examples of

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breaking quote-unquote

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rules and principles yes i am giving a

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specific

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detailed understanding of how to write a

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dramatic narrative

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not all stories will look like this but

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as a new writer

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you need to start somewhere spending all

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of your time focusing on exceptions

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doesn't help you write a strong

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narrative for the first time

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and note number two i'm not going to

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take a look at a short film to explain

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how to write a short film

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i'm going to take a look at the main

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plot of rick and morty episode 202.

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so why am i doing this why am i not

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looking at a short film

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here's the unfortunate reality most

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short films are not well written

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narrative dramas

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many shorts are poetic or they get lost

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in a concept or they are experimental

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and a lot of short films are simply made

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for a director's reel or to give an

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actor more experience

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if you'd like to take a look at some

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professionally made short films for

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further study

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i recommend going to shortoftheweek.com

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linked below

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the main plot of rick and morty episode

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202 takes up most of the episode

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at about 16 to 18 minutes of the run

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time with the b

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plot taking up about three to five

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minutes of the run time

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this makes the main story about the same

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length as a short film

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between 10 and 20 pages and it's a great

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way to take a look at how you can create

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a full narrative drama

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in a very short period of time

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now with all that out of the way i'm

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going to show you

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how to write a short film so you're

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starting out with a few ideas

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you've got a scene or two in your head

play02:39

and maybe you have a concept or genre

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now let's start organizing and

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developing your story into something

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that's clear and focused

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a lot of people ask me how to get ideas

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for screenplays or for short scripts

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and i'm always confused by this question

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writers have story ideas

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if you're reading novels watching films

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and trying to write story ideas will

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come into your head

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getting some basic ideas to start with

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shouldn't be difficult if you're having

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serious trouble thinking up any ideas

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i suggest that maybe writing isn't for

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you or at the very least you aren't

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immersed enough in storytelling

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pick up a few novels and then come back

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alright so let's begin building the

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foundation of your story

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by defining your philosophical conflict

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the first thing you need to build out is

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your philosophical conflict

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remember my video on the purpose of

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conflict in that video i explain

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philosophical conflict

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how it works and why it's important for

play03:33

your story

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as a quick refresher philosophical

play03:36

conflict is the different philosophical

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moral or ethical beliefs that are in

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conflict within your story

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like i explained in the purpose of

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conflict video philosophical conflict is

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the backbone of storytelling

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and it should be the backbone of your

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story so how do you build

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philosophical conflict into a story what

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you want to do is create a viewpoint

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versus viewpoint

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conflict let's go to our example to see

play04:01

what i mean

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in rick and morty episode 202 the

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philosophical conflict is based around

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a moral question in the beginning of the

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episode rick meets an assassin

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and sells him a weapon morty is

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surprised and disgusted by this

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you sell weapons to killers for money

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ugh you've got what the intergalactic

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call a very planetary mindset morty it's

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more complicated out here

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here we see a difference in ricks and

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morty's moral viewpoints

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morty's disgust rises when he realizes

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that rick only sold the weapon

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so that he could go to an arcade but

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rick doesn't care at all

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you sold a gun to a murderer so you

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could play video games yeah sure i mean

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if you spend all day shuffling words

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around you can make anything sound bad

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morty now we can define the

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philosophical conflict of the episode

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the philosophical conflict comes down

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into two viewpoints

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absolute morality versus moral

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relativism

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morty believes that rick selling a gun

play04:54

to an assassin is objectively wrong

play04:56

and morty believes that life is

play04:58

objectively valuable

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rick believes that it doesn't matter he

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believes he can do what he wants and

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that he defines his own morality

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selling a gun to a hitman is the same as

play05:07

pulling the trigger it's also the same

play05:09

as doing nothing

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if chromopoulos michael wants someone

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dead there's not a lot anyone can do to

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stop him

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so this story has a very clear

play05:16

philosophical conflict

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it is clearly asking questions like is

play05:20

it morally wrong to supply weapons to

play05:22

killers

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is there an absolute standard of

play05:25

morality and these questions are

play05:27

expressed through the clear viewpoints

play05:29

of the characters

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not every rick and morty episode has the

play05:32

philosophical conflict as clear and

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specific as this one

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but this one is very useful to get an

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understanding of how to use

play05:38

philosophical conflict correctly

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it doesn't matter if your story is 10

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pages long or 3 000 pages long

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you still need specific philosophical

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conflict that will drive the events of

play05:49

the story

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once you establish your philosophical

play05:52

conflict it's time to attach beliefs

play05:55

to your different characters so i

play05:57

explained that you need to create a

play05:59

viewpoint versus viewpoint dilemma in

play06:01

your philosophical conflict

play06:03

now you need to attach different beliefs

play06:05

within those ideas

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onto your characters your characters

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will hold different points of view

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then these differing points of view will

play06:12

place the characters

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into conflict with one another let's

play06:16

return to our example

play06:17

so this story has a very clear

play06:19

philosophical conflict it is clearly

play06:21

asking questions like

play06:22

is there an absolute standard of

play06:24

morality or do we create our own

play06:26

morality

play06:27

and these questions are expressed

play06:29

through the clear viewpoints of the

play06:30

characters

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morty holds a belief that is important

play06:33

for the philosophical conflict

play06:35

he believes that rick selling a weapon

play06:37

to an assassin is objectively wrong

play06:40

this belief stems from his larger belief

play06:43

that there is an absolute morality of

play06:45

some sort and that right and wrong

play06:47

matters

play06:48

rick holds an opposing belief that is

play06:50

important for the philosophical conflict

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rick believes that he can do what he

play06:53

wants that there is no absolute standard

play06:56

of morality

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he believes he creates his own morality

play06:59

and that there is nothing objectively

play07:00

wrong with him selling a weapon to an

play07:02

assassin

play07:03

because there is no objective morality

play07:05

in the first place

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and we can clearly see how their beliefs

play07:08

conflict in this scene

play07:10

selling a gun to a hitman is the same as

play07:12

pulling the trigger it's also the same

play07:14

as doing nothing if chromopoulos michael

play07:16

wants someone dead there's not a lot

play07:17

anyone can do to stop him

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now that you have created this

play07:21

separation the audience is now involved

play07:23

in the philosophical conflict

play07:25

as a viewer you are participating in the

play07:28

moral dilemma

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you're not necessarily consciously

play07:31

laying out the different viewpoints in

play07:32

your mind as you watch the story unfold

play07:34

but you are unconsciously involved in

play07:37

this moral dilemma and what happens in

play07:39

the story

play07:40

will either challenge or confirm your

play07:42

personal beliefs on the philosophical

play07:44

conflict

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this is how you create empathy between

play07:48

the audience and your characters in your

play07:50

own story

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and this is how you can really invest

play07:53

your audience and wondering what happens

play07:55

next

play07:55

in your story now let's take a quick

play07:57

look at the secondary characters in this

play07:59

episode

play08:00

chromebopulus michael is the assassin

play08:02

that buys the weapon from rick

play08:04

k michael has no code of ethics

play08:06

whatsoever he literally says so in the

play08:09

dialogue

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it's a comedic line but it is also his

play08:12

actual philosophical view

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in the story nice to meet you morty

play08:16

listen if you ever need anybody murdered

play08:18

please give me a call

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you're giving him a card no code of

play08:21

ethics i will kill anyone

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anywhere children animals old people

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doesn't

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matter i just love killing k michael and

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rick hold somewhat similar philosophical

play08:31

beliefs

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like rick k michael clearly does not

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hold a belief in absolute morality

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the nebulous being named fart that morty

play08:39

saves halfway through the episode

play08:40

holds a philosophical point of view but

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i'll get into that more in the next

play08:44

section

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what's important is that he introduces

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conflict that forces morty to make

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choices

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based upon what he believes morty don't

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do it

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morty morty idiot oh crap let's get you

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out of here

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k michael and fart are characters that

play09:02

are important but secondary in regards

play09:04

to the philosophical conflict

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rick and morty are the two who are

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opposing each other philosophically

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k michael and fart become elements of

play09:12

that philosophical conflict playing out

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so when you're building your characters

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attach specific philosophical beliefs to

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them

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that will define who your characters are

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as people

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and will also define their actions

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placing them in conflict with the other

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characters around them

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now that you have your philosophical

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conflict and your characters

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let's talk about action and structure

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you should try to build out your story

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using the principles of narrative drama

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and story momentum many writers learn

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about story structure

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as it relates to screenplays and tv

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shows but when they get to a short

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script

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they toss structure completely out of

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the window as if it doesn't matter

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but this is a terrible idea story

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structure matters just as much in a

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short script as it does in a

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feature-length screenplay

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so how should you structure your short

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script the most effective way

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i've found is to use dan harmon's story

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circle i

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explained how the story circle works in

play10:06

this video

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harman's story circle is an extremely

play10:10

versatile and organic way of structuring

play10:12

your story

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and it can be used for an entire feature

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length screenplay or a single scene

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because it is able to fractal down and

play10:19

be used in different pieces of a story

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it works perfectly in helping you build

play10:23

a strong short script

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so let's break down how this rick and

play10:27

morty episode fits into the story circle

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and also show how the characters actions

play10:32

are motivated by their beliefs

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at one our character is morty morty

play10:37

believes in an absolute morality

play10:39

rick stands on the other side of the

play10:40

moral spectrum he does not believe in

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any sort of objective morality

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in the very beginning morty encounters a

play10:46

philosophical problem

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rick sells a gun to an assassin at two

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now morty formulates his want

play10:52

for the story morty wants to fix the

play10:55

ethical problem that rick has created

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you know you could stop this killing

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from happening rick you know you did a

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bad thing selling that gun but

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you could undo it if you wanted at

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number three morty enters an unfamiliar

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situation

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when he decides to go after k michael

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morty does this because of his

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philosophical belief

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that what rick did was objectively wrong

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and that rick's actions should be

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righted

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at number four morty tracks down k

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michael quickly

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you have arrived at crom populous

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michael

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your destination is below at number five

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morty gets what he wants when he stops k

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michael from killing his target

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morty has completed his philosophical

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mission and put the world back to its

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moral neutrality as morty sees it the

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nebulous being fart

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now asks morty to save him rick thinks

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this is a terrible idea

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again following his belief that there is

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no objective morality and that we should

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not just save others for no reason

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but morty frees fart and this is the

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midpoint of the story

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notice that in just a few short minutes

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we have had a major philosophical

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conflict

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characters taking action based upon

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their beliefs and

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a clear midpoint turning point but at 6

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now morty's actions come at a cost

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things are not as simple as morty

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believes

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as rick and morty try to escape with

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fart morty realizes that saving fart's

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life is coming at the cost of many other

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lives

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and rick openly challenges morty on this

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hey morty remember when you said selling

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a gun was as bad as pulling the trigger

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how do you feel about all these people

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that are getting killed today because of

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your choices

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i did the right thing rick at number

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seven

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morty returns back to his familiar

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situation by finishing the conflict of

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the story

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when he gets fart to his portal to go

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back to his universe

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and now we get the philosophical climax

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of the story

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up until this point morty believes he

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has done the right thing

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until now we will be back for your

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cleansing um

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cleansing carbon-based life is a threat

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to all higher life

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to us you are what you would call a

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disease wherever we discover you we cure

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it

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you said yourself that life must be

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protected even through sacrifice

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and this is a defining moment at number

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eight

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and we move to the last point morty

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changes

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morty kills fart to save his universe

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from being destroyed

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this action represents a philosophical

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change in morty

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morty realizes that the world is greater

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than he thought it was

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and this is where the story makes a

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philosophical statement

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the story is saying that knowing what

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the right thing to do

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is a lot more difficult than we realize

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and that things

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are not always as clear as we'd like

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them to be

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in this episode rick wins the

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philosophical conflict

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and the story gives rick a moment to

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gloat morty i know i picked on your core

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beliefs and decision-making a lot today

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but i am glad that you insisted on

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getting that fart home

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you know at least all the death and

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destruction wasn't for nothing you know

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this structure gives us a story with

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clear momentum

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and narrative drive it allows the

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characters to take action

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and make decisions and deal with the

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consequences of those actions

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and it's all done in a very short time

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frame

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alright let's review your story will be

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about philosophical beliefs and

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differing points of view

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also known as the philosophical conflict

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then

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these beliefs will be placed onto your

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characters different characters will

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hold different beliefs

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and those beliefs will be in conflict

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with one another then your characters

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take actions based upon their beliefs

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the actions of your characters based

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upon their beliefs define

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the external and internal conflicts

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allowing your characters to take action

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and deal with the consequences of their

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actions

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will build narrative momentum so let me

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make this

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as simple as possible for you beliefs

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plus characters plus action equals

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character action

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motivated by beliefs this will be the

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driving force

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of your story i can already hear some

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writers typing in the comments telling

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me that this is too restrictive and

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formulaic

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and i'll remind you that as a new writer

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you need to spend time learning the

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principles of storytelling

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you can't simply jump in trying to break

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the rules you don't need to worry about

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breaking rules because you haven't even

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learned any rules at all yet

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once you have a strong understanding of

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story momentum and narrative drive

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then you can talk about how to bend or

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break principles but as a new writer

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that is not your focus so don't let

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these procrastinators confuse you

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now before we end i want to talk a bit

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about what very few writing teachers

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actually talk about the writing process

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when you're preparing to write your

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short script don't spend more than a day

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or two on your outline

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it's a short script not an oscar-winning

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screenplay so don't be so precious with

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it

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remember you're learning right now

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learning takes time and learning takes

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writing again and again

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i know right now some writers have

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watched this video and their heads are

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filled

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with questions they want to know the

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answer to 20 more questions before they

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actually sit down and begin writing

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and if that's you let me tell you that

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you don't need answers to more questions

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you are letting your procrastination

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take control of you you keep wanting it

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to be more complicated than it is

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it simply isn't tell yourself it's time

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to stop asking questions and constantly

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searching for another screenwriting book

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it's time to write so open your

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scriptwriting software

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and write that short script so now you

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have a clear blueprint to write your

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first short script

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and in the next video i'm going to be

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taking a look at common short script

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mistakes so that you can find and fix

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the problems in your short script

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so if you'd like to watch the rest of

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the videos in this series you can click

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the link on the screen now

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or you can click the link in the

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description and if you like this video

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please leave a like and subscribe for

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more videos just like this one

play16:57

you

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Related Tags
ScreenwritingTipsStorytellingGuideRickAndMortyAnalysisPhilosophicalConflictNarrativeStructureCharacterDevelopmentMoralDilemmasWritingProcessShortFilmScriptCreativeWriting