How I would approach gamedev (if I had to start over)

BiteMe Games
19 Mar 202418:34

Summary

TLDRIn this video, the game developer shares insights from their journey, highlighting the mistakes and successes in their career. They discuss the pitfalls of expanding on a game jam prototype, the importance of team commitment, and the value of investing in assets and tooling. They also emphasize the need for research and focusing on visuals, as well as the benefits of starting as a side project, having a team, and creating a YouTube channel for marketing and additional income. The developer advises shipping games quickly and learning from each project to improve future developments.

Takeaways

  • 🚀 Start with a fresh concept after a game jam to avoid technical debt.
  • 🌟 Clearly define roles and commitments within the team to manage expectations and workload distribution.
  • 🤔 Be prepared to fully commit or give up; avoid partial commitment which can slow down progress.
  • 🛠️ Invest time in tooling to streamline the development process and improve efficiency.
  • 💰 Consider purchasing assets early on to save time and improve the game's visual quality.
  • 📚 Conduct thorough research before starting game development to avoid common pitfalls.
  • 🎨 Prioritize visuals from the beginning to ensure the game is appealing to potential players.
  • 📈 Focus on smaller, more frequent game releases to learn and improve quickly.
  • 📊 Attend local developer events for feedback rather than large, costly conventions.
  • 🔑 Avoid selling game keys at events to ensure valid reviews on platforms like Steam.
  • 🎥 Leverage YouTube and other platforms for documenting progress and building a community.

Q & A

  • What is the speaker's experience in the game development industry?

    -The speaker has been working as a game developer for over two years and has been a full-time game developer for nearly one year. They have shipped their first commercial game, Forge Industry, and have made tough decisions such as cancelling their SQL game to pivot to something with more potential.

  • What was one of the biggest mistakes the speaker's studio made with their game jam prototype?

    -One of the biggest mistakes was continuing to build upon their game jam prototype instead of starting fresh. This led to technical debt and inefficiencies because the initial code was written quickly without much thought to efficiency.

  • How did the speaker's team dynamics affect their game development process?

    -The team dynamics were problematic due to a lack of clear commitment from all members. There was an imbalance in the amount of work done by each team member, leading to disputes and slow progress.

  • What did the speaker learn about giving up during the development process?

    -The speaker learned that if they were to give up, they should either fully commit to giving up or fully commit to continuing the project. Partially giving up led to a standstill in development and wasted time.

  • Why did the speaker emphasize the importance of spending time on tooling for their games?

    -The speaker emphasized the importance of tooling because it significantly improves efficiency. Without proper tools, implementing a single item could take a long time, but with the right tools, the process becomes much quicker and easier.

  • What was the impact of purchasing assets for the speaker's game development?

    -Purchasing assets was a significant investment that saved a lot of time, especially in 3D modeling. It allowed the speaker to focus on other aspects of game development and improved the visual quality of their game.

  • What was the speaker's realization about their lack of research in game development?

    -The speaker realized that they made a mistake by not researching and learning more about game development before starting. This lack of knowledge led to avoidable mistakes and a difficult learning process.

  • How did the speaker's approach to visuals in their first game affect its reception?

    -The speaker focused mainly on the mechanics and code in their first game, neglecting the visuals. This resulted in a game that didn't look good, which negatively impacted the feedback and reception of the game.

  • Why did the speaker advise against showcasing games at large events?

    -The speaker advised against it because the cost and time investment did not yield a good return on investment. The stress and preparation required for such events, along with the opportunity cost of development time lost, were not worth the few wish lists they received.

  • What was the speaker's stance on selling game keys at events?

    -The speaker considered selling game keys at events a mistake because Steam does not count people with keys as valid reviews. This affected their game's visibility on Steam and they did not receive enough reviews upon release.

  • What does the speaker wish they had done differently with their development timeline?

    -The speaker wishes they had shipped their game sooner with a smaller scope. They believe in focusing on releasing multiple games in shorter development cycles to learn and improve quickly.

  • What positive aspects came out of the speaker's experience in game development?

    -The speaker highlights starting as a side project, having a team, and creating a YouTube channel as positive aspects. These elements helped manage stress, improve accountability, and provided an additional source of income and marketing.

Outlines

00:00

🚀 Reflecting on Game Development Journey

The speaker shares their experiences as a full-time game developer, highlighting their journey over the past two years. They discuss the release of their first commercial game, Forge Industry, and the tough decision to cancel another project. The speaker also talks about their role in influencing other aspiring game developers through their YouTube channel, aiming to help them avoid common mistakes. They reflect on their growth and the lessons learned, setting the stage for discussing what they would do differently if starting a studio in 2024.

05:01

🎮 Learning from Mistakes in Game Development

The speaker delves into the mistakes made during their game development process. They discuss the pitfalls of continuing to work from a game jam prototype, leading to technical debt and inefficiencies. The speaker also addresses issues with team commitment, where some members did not contribute as expected, causing imbalances and disputes within the team. They share how partial surrender from the project led to a standstill in development and the importance of fully committing or giving up entirely.

10:03

🛠️ The Importance of Tooling and Assets

The speaker emphasizes the importance of investing time in tooling for efficient game development, especially for mechanically heavy games. They recount how their initial lack of streamlined tools led to inefficiencies in implementing game items. The speaker also talks about the benefits of purchasing assets to save time and improve the visual quality of the game, sharing their experience with the Cinti Fantasy Kingdom pack as a worthwhile investment.

15:05

📚 Research and Focus on Visuals

The speaker discusses the lack of research done before entering game development, which led to avoidable mistakes such as launching during a Steam summer sale. They stress the importance of learning from others' experiences and focusing on the visual aspects of the game from the beginning. The speaker also talks about showcasing games at events and the pitfalls of selling game keys at these events, which can lead to low review counts on platforms like Steam.

🎬 Balancing Event Participation and Game Keys

The speaker shares their experiences with participating in large gaming events and the financial and time investment involved. They express that the return on investment was not satisfactory, with the stress and preparation time not yielding enough wish lists or sales. The speaker also discusses the mistake of selling game keys at events, which affected their visibility and review count on Steam, ultimately leading to a less successful launch.

🚀 Prioritizing Game Launch and Learning from Experience

The speaker talks about the importance of launching games quickly and the pitfalls of overextending the development timeline. They reflect on their initial ambitious timeline for developing Forge Industry and the lessons learned from this experience. The speaker suggests focusing on shipping multiple games in shorter development cycles to learn and improve as a studio, rather than spending excessive time on a single project.

🌟 Successes in Game Development

The speaker reflects on the positive aspects of their game development journey. They highlight the benefits of starting as a side project, allowing for less pressure and a more sustainable approach to game creation. The speaker also underscores the value of having a team, even with mismatched skill sets, to provide support and accountability throughout the development process. Lastly, they discuss the unexpected success of their YouTube channel, which not only served as a marketing tool but also as a source of additional income and a platform for sharing their experiences and learnings with a broader audience.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡game development

The process of creating a video game, which involves designing game mechanics, writing code, creating art assets, and more. In the video, the speaker reflects on their journey as a game developer, sharing insights and lessons learned from their experiences in developing and releasing games.

💡Forge Industry

The first commercial game developed by the speaker's team. It serves as a primary example throughout the video, illustrating the challenges and successes encountered during its development, such as the decision to pivot from a game jam prototype to a full-fledged game.

💡game jam

An event where game developers create a game from scratch within a short time frame, often 24-72 hours. The speaker mentions their participation in a game jam as a starting point for Forge Industry, but later advises against continuing to develop game jam prototypes into full games due to technical debt and inefficiencies.

💡commitment

The level of dedication and involvement one has towards a project or task. In the context of the video, the speaker discusses the importance of clear commitment within a team, highlighting the issues caused by imbalanced contributions and the resulting disputes that can arise.

💡tooling

The creation of software tools to streamline and simplify the development process. The speaker emphasizes the importance of investing time in tooling, especially for games with complex mechanics or items, to improve efficiency and save time in the long run.

💡assets

Resources such as 3D models, textures, and sounds used in the creation of a game. The speaker shares their experience of initially trying to create all assets from scratch and later realizing the value of purchasing assets to save time and improve the game's visual quality.

💡visuals

The aesthetic elements of a game, including its graphics, art style, and user interface. The speaker discusses the importance of focusing on visuals early in the development process to ensure the game is appealing and to avoid having to make significant changes later on.

💡game events

Public exhibitions or conventions where game developers showcase their work to potential players and industry professionals. The speaker shares their mixed experiences with game events, noting both the benefits of direct feedback and the downsides of cost and time investment.

💡YouTube channel

A platform used for sharing video content on YouTube. The speaker discusses the role of their YouTube channel in documenting their game development journey, providing marketing for their games, and serving as a source of additional income and community engagement.

💡shipping games

The process of completing and releasing a game to the public. The speaker emphasizes the importance of shipping games quickly and iteratively, learning from each release, and improving the development cycle for subsequent projects.

Highlights

The speaker has been working as a game developer for over two years and is approaching a one-year milestone of being a full-time game developer.

The speaker has shipped their first commercial game, Forge Industry, and had to make tough decisions such as cancelling their SQL game to pivot to something with more potential.

Through their YouTube channel, the speaker has influenced many aspiring game developers by sharing their experiences and helping them avoid common mistakes.

The speaker reflects on the mistakes made in game development and shares 10 things they would do differently if starting a studio in 2024.

Continuing to work from a game jam prototype is identified as a major mistake, as it can lead to technical debt and inefficient development.

Lack of clear commitment within the team led to an imbalance of work distribution and eventual team disputes.

The speaker advises against partially giving up on a project, suggesting that one should either fully commit or move on.

Not spending enough time on tooling was a significant oversight, as it resulted in inefficient workflows and increased development time.

Investing in assets, such as the Cinti Fantasy Kingdom pack, was one of the best decisions made, as it saved significant time and improved the game's visuals.

The speaker regrets not doing enough research before entering game development, highlighting the importance of learning from others' experiences.

Focusing on visuals early in the development process is crucial, as it impacts the game's reception and player engagement.

Showcasing games at large events was not cost-effective for the speaker's studio, and they advise against it for indie game developers.

Selling game keys at events turned out to be a mistake, as these keys did not contribute to valid reviews on Steam, affecting the game's visibility.

The speaker emphasizes the importance of shipping games quickly and scoping down projects to learn and improve faster.

Starting game development as a side project while maintaining a full-time job is recommended to reduce stress and financial pressure.

Having a team, even with mismatched skill sets, is beneficial for accountability, feedback, and making the development process more enjoyable.

The speaker's YouTube channel, initially intended for marketing, became an unexpected success and an additional source of income.

Transcripts

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for over two years I've been working as

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a game developer now and I'm also

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approaching a one-year Milestone of just

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being this full-time game developer and

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over that time I've done various things

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I've shipped Forge industry which was

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our first commercial game I've had to

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make tough decisions such as cancelling

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our SQL game and pivoting to something

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else that we think has more potential

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and I think most importantly I've

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influenced a lot of other aspiring game

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developers through this YouTube channel

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that you're watching right now help them

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with not making the same mistakes we did

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and just making sure that they game

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development experience is as nice as

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possible now I think I'm reaching a

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point where I've been doing this for so

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long that I can start reflecting a bit

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more on what are the mistakes that we

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made because I don't see myself as an

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absolute beginner anymore so this video

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I'll be going over 10 things that I

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would do different if I was starting a

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studio in 2024 and trying to make our

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first games then with the knowledge I

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have now and I think you should also

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stick around until the end because I'll

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also be talking about three things that

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I wouldn't change things that I think we

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did really well so definitely make sure

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to watch the ire video and I think the

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first thing that we learned as a studio

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Al together is that we should not

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continue working from a game Jam

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Prototype game jams are great to quickly

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find out if your game is fun if there's

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potential and like try it out they're

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also very short in time to just make and

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we had a little game Jam for Forge

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industry where we want to figure out can

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we get this working can we work in unity

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the big mistake is once we had that

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prototype that like mored in very big

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quotation marks we just decided to keep

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on building upon that and that is

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probably one of the biggest mistakes we

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did instead if you have a game Jam

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project and you're like this is nice I

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really enjoy this be proud of what you

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made but then throw it in the garbage or

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like don't throw it in the garbage but

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start a fresh if you decide to actually

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pursue the game idea or the game concept

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that you made in that game Jam as a

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fullon game you're going to have so much

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technical dep because you'll be writing

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Cod without having much time to really

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think about is this the most efficient

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way and if you're going to keep building

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upon that very very weak base of a game

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it's only going to ask for problems and

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it has cost us literal months of extra

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development time because we didn't throw

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our game away when we had that first

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prototype and start fresh with more

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ideas the next mistake we did is we were

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in a team and a big mistakes we made is

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we had no clear definitions of who was

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going to commit how much to our game

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when I make these YouTube videos I'm

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often like yeah we started as four

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people but you don't really see the

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fourth Pur anymore that's Jamie because

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we had some struggles in terms of

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commitment there was definitely an

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imbalance with the four of us and how

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much we've worked especially when we

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were doing that like the first year it

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was mainly Thomas and I who did most of

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the work and then William he pretty

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quickly fizzled out a bit and then

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dropped development for multiple months

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similar to Jamie he also in the end

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didn't end up committing that much to

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our game and I think this was definitely

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something that look it's going to happen

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but we also made some mistakes there

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because we didn't really have hard

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commitments of this is how much we're

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going to work as a team and try to stick

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to that and call each other out if that

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wasn't met if we didn't actually reach

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the commitment that we originally had

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set out for I think that would have

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helped a lot in just managing the team

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Vibes as well because if everyone has an

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equal share distribution which we didn't

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have but if that's the case but there's

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not an equal division of the amount of

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hours worked you're going to be

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struggling with your team I can tell you

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that there will be disputes about it and

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it's very avoidable still and this low

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commitment actually leads to the third

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problem and that is that we half asked

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giving up but I think if you give up you

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should either just give up or you should

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keep going but but what we did wrong is

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we like partially gave up like I said

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Thomas and I we still kept working on

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the game for a period of four months

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basically from March to July but the

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other two teammates they basically

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dropped out and I think Thomas and I we

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should have just either been like okay

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look we give up or we figure out

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something with just the two of us but we

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didn't do that I'd like to say it ended

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up working out for us still but it has

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cost us a lot of time it was four 5

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months where development just crawled

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basically to a standstill I even stopped

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uploading these YouTube videos for a

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while I think we can see that in like

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the history of like devlog 4 and then

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like devlog 5 or something like that it

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wasn't really good it basically just

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hibernated our studio for multiple

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months where we could have used that

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time to either work on something else or

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just keep working on the project we were

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working on but we kind of half ass

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giving up which in the end left us with

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not much really useful the next mistake

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we made is also kind of related to to

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that game game Jam thing and that is

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that we didn't spend enough time on

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tooling this is something that we've

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learned by now but especially if you're

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making a more mechanically heavy game or

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an item heavy game like we did with

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Forge industry it is so worth it to

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spend time on tooling and to get

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something like Odin which is a Unity

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asset there's probably similar things

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for unreal and Gau where you can make it

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very easy for yourself to add new items

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for example to add new workstations

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because we had a very convoluted

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workflow we didn't spend any time on

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making tool tools which meant that

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implementing a single item in Forge

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industry took about 5 minutes and we had

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700 items that was not an efficient way

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to do things and we had a bunch of

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scriptable objects and we had prefabs

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and they weren't really linked to each

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other you had to change certain

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variables in multiple positions and it

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cost us so much time but we never really

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were like okay let's just spend a bit of

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time on first writing the tools so we

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can create the items that is something I

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think we do much better now with Guild

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Arch the first thing we did basically

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was create tools to make objects in our

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game so it's very easy now for us to add

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new decoration items for example that

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are part of the game's content and sure

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the first version of the tools you make

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won't be efficient but if you always

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force yourself to use the tools they are

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going to become really good really

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quickly instead of just doing the Quick

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Fix of doing everything manually and

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you're just going to hate your life and

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then another mistake with it is also

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that we didn't spend enough on assets

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and with this I mean cold heart cash

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basically only about 7 months into the

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development of Forge industry we

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realized that I can't do everything

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myself 3D modeling wise and that was the

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first time we actually bought assets we

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bought like the cinti fantasy Kingdom

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pack and that was probably one of the

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best investments we could have made

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because sure I remember I paid like a

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100 bucks for it in sale I think and it

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somewhat hurt but on the other hand I

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was still working a full-time job I did

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have disposable income to put into that

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asset pack and and it saved me so much

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time afterwards in getting the visuals

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of the game somewhat better already

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they're still not great but that's also

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like Shader and Technical art related

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but just the models itself not having to

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make everything from scratch saved us so

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much time and I think this is something

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that I've been preaching on this channel

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a lot at this point but definitely we

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should have just started with assd packs

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from day one whereas instead for a game

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Jam we were like we'll do everything

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100% from scratch which was a stupid

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idea another mistake we made and that I

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think especially I made is I didn't do

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enough research before getting into game

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development so what do I mean by that I

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kind of just brute forced my way into

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Game Dev I only look things up if I

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really had to look it up like for

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example figuring out how blender like

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the basic functions of blender work but

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I never sat down and did like a full

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like course of learn blender modeling or

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whatever I always looked purely for I

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have this problem what's the solution

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and it extends even more than that and

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this is a mistake that I know you aren't

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doing anymore because you're watching

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this video is I didn't watch any gamee

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YouTubers really I had no clue how indie

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game development worked when I say that

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this channel is just me documenting the

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stuff that I fail at and like and brute

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forcing my way to gamee I mean that I

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still honestly don't watch that much

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gamee YouTube because I didn't feel like

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there was much out there back then that

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really appealed to me as well now

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clearly I appeal to you so you're

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already doing something good there but

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because of that because I didn't have

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anyone really who was just talking to me

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about the game the process we made some

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very painful mistakes such as trying to

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launch in a steam summer sale luckily we

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dodged that bullet last minute but still

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I didn't know that that wasn't the thing

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you should do or that your game can get

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pirated before your game even released

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because of things like steam curators

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those are things that I've had to just

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School of Hard Knocks learn myself to

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make videos about this on this channel

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but I also never actively looked for the

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that kind of content when we were making

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our first game to begin with another

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mistake with it is that we didn't focus

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enough on visuals I know once again I've

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been beating this horse to that on this

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YouTube channel over the past few months

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but I wasn't aware that your game had to

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look good when you start making games

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for the first time so once again I'll

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pull up some devlog footage from our

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first versions of Forge industry only

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after four five I think six months did

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we have like actual color and a few

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basic models in our game we were very

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far from having a visual game in the the

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beginning and because of that you can't

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just slap visuals on your game like the

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last few months and that's why for indry

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doesn't look the greatest would get a

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lot of feedback about it I know it but

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it's something that if you don't even

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focus on it the first half year of

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development you're kind of dead in the

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water so I think definitely that's also

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what we're doing with Guild architect

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now we're almost focusing on the visuals

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first and then only start working on the

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giant complex mechanics just because

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that already makes it easier to start

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thinking about the final result of the

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game like the final visual style and

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things like that we did not think about

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any of those things at all when making

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Forge industry we just purely focused on

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the code and the mechanics first and

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didn't care about the visuals at all

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then another mistake that once again

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there isn't much like information about

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is we went and showcased our game on

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events now what I want to say here is

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that I don't mean like go to small local

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place testing events with like local Dev

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groups those are great but what I talk

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about here is we went to Game Force is

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what it's called in Belgium it's like a

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relatively big event that has 20,000

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visitors each year where you can

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showcase your game to regular consumers

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regular Gamers and just get your wish

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list that way basically that's the idea

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we had however it was a waste of money

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if you ask me it's 2 days of constant

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talking constant stress and it also

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costs you money to go to those events it

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cost us about ,000 every time we went to

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those events we got like 60 wish lists

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from that and that is not really a good

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return on investment also there's an

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opportunity cost because it's days in

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advance that you need to prepare for

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your game it's days that you're there

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that you can't work on your game and

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then like the two days after you go to

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one of those conventions you're dead and

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there's nothing really you can do

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focused work on your game so we've done

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it three times at this point and the one

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reason that we did it was like oh it's

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great to get feedback from like watching

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people play your game and directly give

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you feedback be able to talk to your

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audience that is nice but honestly it's

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not worth all of the time all that money

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to spend on it I think Indie Games who

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go to Gamescom like who have all their

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budget and they just go to Gamescom

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hoping to get some extra wish lists it's

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a waste of money and they're going to

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never recoup that you're going

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especially for Gamescom you're going to

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be spending between 5 and $110,000 even

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if you just want to have the smallest

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boots and it takes like 5 days that you

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need to be there you're going to need

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multiple staff members you're going to

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need to get housing and things like that

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it's generally never worth it it's

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always going to be more worth it to take

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money and to spend it on an artist or to

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spend it on a programmer or anyone

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really who can actually make the game

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better because like I said like you're

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not getting good wish list from these

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events anyway and then another mistake

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we did that is linked to these events is

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we sold game keys on the events this is

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like good and bad on the one hand it was

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good because we had that hustle we were

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able to sell about €600 worth of game

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keys on that event so we only had to pay

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€400 for it at the end of the day but

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the biggest mistake we did here is we

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sold game keys to our Die Hard fans but

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once we actually released our game we

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didn't manage to reach 10 reviews

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because steam doesn't count people who

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have steam Keys as valid reviews because

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they only count the ones who are bought

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through the steam side itself once again

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this is one of those things that I did

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not know was a thing and because of that

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we didn't reach 10 reviews when our game

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launched and we basically got banished

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into the shadow realm of steam until we

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made that video where we talked about

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our pretty disastrous launch and a lot

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of people actually ended up pity buying

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the game and then leaving us reviews

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which then eventually brought us that

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Spike of the 10 review marker which gave

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us a lot of extra visibility through

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Steam but we really got lucky with that

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one and the last thing that I would

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change is I would ship sooner we should

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have really scope down again much more

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because now it took 18 months between

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starting development and that is

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including those four or five months

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where we like half F giving up up until

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July last year July 2023 where we

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actually released Forge industry that is

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too long honestly we planned to make

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Forge industry in just one month which

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was a stupid idea as well we had no clue

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what we were doing game the wise but we

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definitely had an giant scope to begin

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with so I think if I had to start a

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studio like from scratch again I think

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the one thing I would focus on is

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shipping as many games as fast as

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possible so I would do something like 3

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months for the first game four months

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for the next game and then 6 months for

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the game after that and maybe once those

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three games have all been shipped and

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we've been able to learn from that find

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out what we're good at as like a studio

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then I would start looking into like

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longer term up to like 9 months one year

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development cycles of games now with

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Guild architect we're looking at a 9mon

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cycle as well songs ever jate we

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originally set out for a six- month one

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and we kind of were able to reach that

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but we had some art issues along the way

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but like purely mechanically we could

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have shipped it so I think definitely

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focus on shipping games relatively soon

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like not like in a week maybe but still

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very short periods lean heavily into

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pre-made assets just to figure out how

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does your engine work and how does the

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entire process of marketing your game

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putting it on Steam and things like that

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work as well the one mistake we had as

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well with Forge industry like I said is

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it took us 7 months to have a game that

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was actually playable where we could

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transport items between different

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workstations and make those items into a

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different item that took way too long we

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should have had something like that way

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way earlier like 2 weeks 4 weeks into

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development now at told you we also did

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some things well so I'll be going over

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this very quickly but maybe I'll break

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this down in like a separate later video

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where I'm just going to be talking about

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the things with it well I think the

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first thing that we did well as game

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developers is we did it as a side

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project we all had paying jobs to begin

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with and then we spent some extra hours

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each week working on Forge industry and

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this was definitely the way to go

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because we didn't have the stress of oh

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we need to release a game as fast as

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possible because the first game you're

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going to make it's not going to be a

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commercial success it's not going to be

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a good return on investment if you quit

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your job and work 6 months on making

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your first like game as a full-time de

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there is no way in hell you're going to

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break even at all even if you don't

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factor in like your hour cost just like

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your bills that stack up like groceries

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and whatever it's not going to be worth

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it so I think definitely starting as

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Game Dev on the side and then maybe if

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you can build up some momentum after

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your first launch you can consider

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quitting your job but definitely don't

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start game def thinking that you should

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just quit your job I think we did that

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really well the second thing that we did

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really well and I wouldn't change is we

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had a team I know a lot of you guys

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you're forever alone you can't find

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someone reliable to work with and I

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understand it it's hard but definitely

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just being with two people already and

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you don't even need to be matching skill

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sets can help a lot when making your

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first games we were four programmers

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which is a pretty terrible combo

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basically if you want to make games but

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still the fact that we were together

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that we could talk about our game we

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weren't just sitting in our homes alone

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silently coding for months on end made

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it much more bearable to make our first

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game so even if you can just get one

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person who can just help you being

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accountable that is already a massive

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win in my book because you're going to

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be much more likely to actually

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finishing your game as well and you can

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have some like in between feedback you

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can really talk about your game talk

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about all of the mechanics in a very

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focused setting and then the last thing

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that I think we did well and that was

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also Poss possible because we had that

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team is this YouTube channel I never

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really planned on this becoming so large

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we just made devlogs really thinking it

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would be the one way we could do

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marketing for Forge industry that did

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not work at all but in the end just

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having had this YouTube channel very

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early on where I could already talk to

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my wall for like literally months on end

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with nobody watching because now we had

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a 1 and a half year Head Start versus if

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we first released Forge industry and

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only then started the YouTube channel

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making a YouTube channel is something

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that takes a lot of time but I think

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it's also something that every Studio

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can do and maybe even should do there's

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a lot of depth in the should you start a

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YouTube channel maybe I'll make like a

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revamped version of that video at some

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point but generally here's my two sents

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one don't make devlogs or at least if

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you do make devlogs make two of them at

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most call them devlog zero and devlog

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one but I think there's more value in

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making a general Studio based YouTube

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channel where you talk about the

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experiences as a studio and the things

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you learned along the way there I think

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there is still a demand for that and one

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of the things that YouTube allows us to

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do at least is it's an extra stream of

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income so we don't have to worry as much

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about how Mega successful our games are

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and we can focus a bit more on

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developing it and we don't have to cut

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as many corners when trying to develop

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our game just because we have to release

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and earn money at some point so those

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are some of the things that I would do

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if I had to start over as a Game Dev

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Studio I hope you learned some extra

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things of this if you've been working as

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as a game developer for a while at this

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point how would you do things

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differently with the knowledge and the

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experience that you've obtained up until

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now I'm really interested to hear more

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about that leave it in the comment down

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below I do read all of them apart from

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that if you're new here we're game

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developers we've made our own game Forge

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industry and we're working on our next

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game we're documenting the process as a

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studio trying to make more games trying

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to get better at making games so if you

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want to just follow us along the way and

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learn some very cool stuff for you as

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well then be sure to head down below and

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subscribe as we make these videos twice

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a week thanks for watching and I'll see

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you guys in the next one bye

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