Inspiring Journeys: From Breaking News to Breaking Barriers

India Global Forum
4 Dec 202321:53

Summary

TLDRIn this engaging conversation, renowned journalist and managing editor of Network 18 Media, Paly Sharma, shares her experiences and insights on women's empowerment, financial literacy, and the challenges faced by women in journalism. She emphasizes the importance of acknowledging women's contributions to society and the necessity of education in STEM fields. Sharma also highlights the role of media in shaping history and the impact of on-the-ground reporting. Her advice to aspiring journalists is to educate oneself and to market one's abilities, drawing from her own journey and the inspiration she finds in her mother's resilience and dedication to education.

Takeaways

  • 🎤 Paly Sharma, an award-winning journalist and managing editor of Network 18 Media, shares her experiences and insights on women's empowerment and journalism.
  • 💬 Empowerment for women requires acknowledgment, freedom of choice, financial independence, and the ability to express opinions.
  • 🕒 Challenges faced by women in journalism are universal and industry-agnostic, with long and demanding hours that can be physically and mentally taxing.
  • 🏆 Despite the presence of many women presenters, newsrooms are still a man's world with more men in decision-making positions.
  • 🚀 Paly Sharma emphasizes the importance of having more women leaders to appreciate and understand the challenges faced by women in the workforce.
  • 🌍 The need for financial literacy and independence is crucial for women, with a staggering percentage of Indian women lacking bank accounts.
  • 💼 Paly Sharma advocates for the teaching of financial literacy as a life skill in schools and the need for women to manage their finances effectively.
  • 🔍 Journalism chose Paly Sharma, and she is passionate about telling stories that are palatable, accessible, and reflective of the India story to a global audience.
  • 📰 The impact of being on the ground during breaking news or conflict provides a perspective that cannot be gained from a studio, shaping the journalist as an individual.
  • 🌟 Paly Sharma's role model and inspiration is her mother, who balanced education, work, and family while teaching her children the importance of values and determination.

Q & A

  • What does Paly Sharma hope to see in the future regarding Women's Day?

    -Paly Sharma hopes to see a time where the world doesn't need a Women's Day to recognize the place of women in society, and that empowerment comes from more than just marketing drives, fancy quotes, and cupcakes.

  • What are the key elements for empowerment according to Paly Sharma?

    -According to Paly Sharma, empowerment requires acknowledgment for one's contributions, freedom of choice, freedom to express opinions, financial independence, and control over one's life.

  • What challenges does Paly Sharma face as a woman in journalism?

    -Paly Sharma faces challenges such as long and demanding work hours, physically and mentally demanding situations, and a newsroom culture that is still largely a man's world, with more men in decision-making positions.

  • How does Paly Sharma describe her journey to becoming a managing editor?

    -Paly Sharma describes her journey as challenging, noting that women are often judged on their performance while men are judged on their potential. She emphasizes the need to prove oneself deserving of one's position and to push for one's case, going against the common belief that talent alone will be recognized and rewarded.

  • What drives Paly Sharma's passion and purpose in storytelling?

    -Paly Sharma's passion in storytelling is driven by her desire to present news stories in a palatable and accessible way, to tell the India story to the world, and to ensure that the stories she tells excite and engage her audience.

  • Can you share any memorable interviews or breaking news stories from Paly Sharma's career?

    -One of the memorable interviews for Paly Sharma was with Pervez Musharraf, the former president of Pakistan and Army Chief, conducted in Dubai. She also mentions covering conflicts in Israel and Ukraine, emphasizing the importance of being on the ground to truly understand the impact on people's lives.

  • What does Paly Sharma believe is the importance of financial independence for women?

    -Paly Sharma believes financial independence is crucial for women as it provides them with control over their lives and the freedom to make choices. She also highlights the need for financial literacy as a life skill that should be taught, especially to women.

  • How does Paly Sharma suggest improving women's financial literacy and empowerment?

    -Paly Sharma suggests that financial literacy should be taught in schools and that there needs to be more support networks for women. She also calls for active intervention to encourage girls to pursue STEM education and for society to transform its expectations of women.

  • What are Paly Sharma's thoughts on the gender pay gap and women's contribution to the global GDP?

    -Paly Sharma finds the gender pay gap disheartening and notes that it will take over a century to close. She emphasizes that women contribute significantly to society and the global GDP, and they should be fully compensated for their contributions.

  • What advice does Paly Sharma have for younger women looking to get into journalism?

    -Paly Sharma advises young women to educate themselves, read widely, and market themselves effectively. She emphasizes the importance of having a basic understanding of subjects, as this knowledge will help them navigate the demanding world of journalism.

  • Who does Paly Sharma consider her role model and why?

    -Paly Sharma considers her mother her role model because of her mother's dedication to education, her ability to balance teaching, raising a family, and furthering her own studies, and the values she instilled in her children.

Outlines

00:00

🎤 Introduction and Career Reflections

The paragraph introduces the guest, Paly Sharma, as an award-winning journalist and former managing editor of News Channel, who has interviewed numerous global industry figures. It highlights her current role as the managing editor of Network 18 Media and her show 'Vantage with Paly Sharma.' The conversation begins with Paly's thoughts on Women's Day and the importance of genuine empowerment beyond marketing and superficial gestures. She emphasizes the need for women to have freedom of choice, financial independence, and the ability to express their opinions. Paly also discusses the challenges women face in journalism, the long hours, and physically and mentally demanding situations, while stressing that newsrooms are still male-dominated. She shares her experience with supportive mentors and her efforts to ensure her team doesn't face the same challenges she did.

05:02

💼 Challenges and Achievements in Journalism

This paragraph delves into the universal challenges women face in any industry, with a focus on journalism. Paly discusses the demanding nature of the job and the need for women to balance home and work life. Despite the presence of many women presenters, decision-making roles are still predominantly held by men. Paly considers herself lucky to have had good mentors and bosses, and she strives to create a supportive environment for her team. The conversation touches on the gender bias in the industry, where women are judged on performance while men are judged on potential. Paly shares her perspective on the importance of women advocating for themselves, especially in the workplace.

10:02

🌍 Global Storytelling and the Importance of Financial Independence

Paly Sharma discusses her passion for journalism and the desire to tell impactful stories. She emphasizes the importance of financial independence and literacy for women, citing the statistic that 62% of Indian women do not have bank accounts. Paly highlights the need for women to manage their finances effectively and the role of financial literacy education in schools. The conversation also covers the need for more women leaders and the support networks that can help women make informed career choices. Paly addresses the gender pay gap and the significant contribution of women to the global GDP, advocating for greater awareness and fair compensation for women's work.

15:04

📚 Education and Empowerment

The discussion shifts to the importance of STEM education for girls and the need to encourage more women to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Paly talks about the challenges women face in balancing family pressures with their careers, especially after obtaining degrees in STEM fields. She mentions the slow progress in closing the gender pay gap and the need for societal transformation to create a more equitable environment. Paly also emphasizes the importance of role models and mentors, sharing her admiration for her mother's resilience and dedication to education and family.

20:07

🚀 Aspiring Journalists and Personal Reflections

In the final paragraph, Paly offers advice to young women interested in journalism. She stresses the importance of self-promotion, education, and a strong foundation of knowledge. Paly talks about the challenges of reporting on difficult subjects and the emotional detachment required to process the stories. She encourages aspiring journalists to develop a thick skin and the ability to tell stories without becoming overly involved. Paly reflects on the importance of telling stories that may not be as exciting as others but are crucial to highlight the hardships faced by many. She concludes with a personal note, expressing gratitude for the opportunity to participate in the India Global Forum 2023.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Empowering Women

Empowering women refers to the process of giving women the ability, confidence, and resources to make decisions and take control of their lives. In the video, the guest emphasizes that true empowerment comes from acknowledgment, freedom of choice, financial independence, and the ability to express one's opinion. It is a central theme as the guest shares her experiences and views on how women can achieve a more significant role in society and the workforce.

💡Journalism

Journalism is the activity of gathering, assessing, creating, and presenting news and information. In the context of the video, the guest has a successful career in journalism, facing challenges and sharing her passion for storytelling. She emphasizes the importance of being on the ground to understand the true impact of events and how journalism can shape or chronicle history.

💡Financial Independence

Financial independence refers to a state where an individual has enough savings or income to cover all their expenses without having to work actively. In the video, the guest highlights the importance of financial independence for women as a key aspect of empowerment. She discusses the need for women to have control over their finances and to be financially literate.

💡Workplace Challenges

Workplace challenges refer to the difficulties and obstacles that employees face in their professional environment. In the video, the guest discusses the specific challenges women face in the newsroom and the broader journalism industry, such as long hours, demanding physical and mental work, and the underrepresentation of women in decision-making roles.

Highlights

Paly Sharma, Managing Editor of Network 18 Media, shares her experiences and insights on women's empowerment and journalism.

Empowering women doesn't come from marketing drives, fancy quotes, or cupcakes; it requires acknowledgment, freedom of choice, and financial independence.

Challenges for women in journalism are universal and industry-agnostic, with long hours and demanding situations.

Newsrooms are still a man's world, with more men in decision-making positions than women.

Paly Sharma emphasizes the importance of having more women leaders to appreciate and understand the challenges women face in the workforce.

Women are often judged on their performance while men are judged on their potential, making it harder for women leaders to prove themselves.

Paly's passion for journalism was ignited by the desire to tell palatable, accessible news stories and to give India a global voice.

Being on the ground during major news events provides a perspective and emotional impact that cannot be gained from a studio.

Paly Sharma believes that journalism is not just about reporting news; it's about chronicling history and shaping the story of a country and its people.

Financial independence is crucial for women's empowerment, but many Indian women still lack bank accounts.

Financial literacy should be taught as a life skill in schools, especially for women, to manage their finances effectively.

Women's unpaid work contributes significantly to the global GDP, highlighting the need for awareness and fair compensation.

Paly Sharma advocates for more women in STEM education and leadership roles to transform society and break inbuilt biases.

Encouraging girls to pursue STEM subjects is essential for their future eligibility for technology-oriented jobs.

Women often face challenges in balancing their careers with family pressures, especially after higher education.

The gender pay gap is a significant issue, with estimates suggesting it will take over a century to close.

Paly Sharma advises young women aspiring to be journalists to educate themselves, read widely, and market themselves effectively.

Journalism requires resilience, the ability to process various situations, and a thick skin to handle the tough realities.

Paly Sharma's role model and inspiration is her mother, who balanced education, work, and family while staying true to her values.

Transcripts

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and we have a really fantastic guest

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coming up for you right now well our

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next guest ladies and gentlemen is a

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well-known

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awardwinning journalist and was

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previously managing editor of won News

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Channel and hosted India's only

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International Prime Time news show

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gravitas our next guest love a good

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debate and has interviewed a huge range

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of political and well-known Global

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industry figures throughout her time she

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is now the managing editor of network 18

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media and has her own show vantage with

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paly sha to share the challenges and

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triumphs that have shaped her career as

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well as the passion and the purpose of

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her storytelling I'm now delighted to

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welcome on stage please give a very warm

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welcome to paly Sharma managing editor

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of network 18 media how are you thank

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you so much for joining us this is very

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exciting you're here yes please do uh

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take a seat how does it feel to be uh in

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in the in the other seat answering the

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questions this time well I will be more

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sympathetic to my guest for let's just

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say that brilliant right I wanted to

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start off with a a tweet that I uh that

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I read online from you and it says I

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hope I live to see the time where the

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world doesn't need a woman's day to

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recognize the place of women in society

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and that empowerment doesn't come from

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marketing drives fancy quotes and

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cupcakes can you elaborate I I agree by

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the way but please do elaborate for us I

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will let me also first start by thanking

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Manoj and igf for for having me here and

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for us to be able to have a conversation

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like this and I I totally sort of stand

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by what I wrote that cupcakes will not

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bring empowerment definitely for

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empowerment you need uh to be

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acknowledged for what you bring to the

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table which women often don't uh you

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need Freedom of Choice um and uh freedom

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to express your opinion you need

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financial Independence you need to be in

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control of your life um and I think I

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think being uh rewarded and being

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appreciated for what you contribute to

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this world uh not just in terms of words

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but I think in our world increasingly

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financially as well is very very

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important and that's something we're

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going to touch on a bit later on cuz I

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know fan Financial Independence for you

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is a a big passion sort of topic um as a

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very successful woman in journalism sort

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of what challenges have you had along

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the way as a woman in journalism has it

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been quite an easy Road for

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you I think uh I think the challenges

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for women are near Universal and they

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are industry agnostic uh though some so

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for for journalists the time that that

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we spend doing our work is the hours are

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longer it it's more demanding physically

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and mentally and you you find yourself

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in situations which are not always

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friendly so yes it can seem more

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daunting from the outside but I think

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any woman who manages both home and work

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uh feels those pressures having said

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that

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um in news rooms still are are are a

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man's world I know there are a lot of

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women presenters but the people who are

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are making the calls are more men than

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women and um and I think I was I was

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lucky to have had some good mentors and

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bosses along the way but I wouldn't say

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that it's easy for anyone uh for people

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in my team and and whatever I learned uh

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in my two or decades I I make sure that

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the challenges I face are not the same

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ones that my team faces I'm sure they

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have their own set of things to worry

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about

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uh but I think what we need is more

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women leaders uh to be able to

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appreciate uh what women in the

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workforce anywhere go through and so I

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mean you you've become you know managing

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editor you a managing editor of two

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networks now so how is that sort of

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Journey bin as a woman have you had to

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fight your way to the top or has it been

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quite a nice supportive atmosphere in

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both

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networks this is not so much about the

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networks it's about the industry that we

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operate in I think and uh

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this this was famously said by someone

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else I love to borrow the code that

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women are are judged on their

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performance and men are judged on their

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potential so you always have to to prove

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both to your bosses and to your teams

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that you're deserving of the seed that

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you have and it's that much harder for

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any woman leader anywhere uh so no it's

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not easy and sometimes you have to go

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against your basic nature and push for

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your case uh because I think a lot of

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women Still Still Believe believe that

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someone somewhere will recognize how

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talented they are and reward them and it

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doesn't happen and uh over the past few

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years when I became a manager when I

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started hiring people I saw that U and

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and I'm not saying it's a bad quality

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but men were very forthright in asking

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for what they think they deserved and

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negotiating better for their salaries

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and for their designations women were

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more they didn't not want to upset

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anyone um and I think that's that's how

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a lot of girls are raised we need to

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change that and we need to to tell them

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that it's okay to ask for what you think

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I've heard that in so many Industries

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not necessarily just media but yeah

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we're always you know we don't want to

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offend anyone we're peacekeepers and we

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never strive because it looks like we're

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being arrogant if we want something else

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you know but in actual fact if you're

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doing exactly the same job why shouldn't

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you you know exactly if you have the

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same skill set um let's go back to your

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journalism what drives the passion and

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purpose in your storytelling how did you

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get into the field of Journalism

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I always say the journalism chose me I

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was I was studying to do something else

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I wanted to be a designer but I somehow

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find my found myself writing for a local

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newspaper and one thing led to the other

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and then I was in a bigger Newsroom it

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was quite fascinating so I stayed and

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did what I was doing um but I think I I

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really I chose journalism after I took a

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break and I did because I don't know how

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much of Indian news or television news

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you guys have consumed but it it became

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a very very crowded place and and the

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kind of Storytelling that I wanted to do

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was not what I was doing or so I thought

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so I I did take a break but when I came

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back I knew that I wanted to tell news

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stories like stories that are that are

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palatable and accessible to people of a

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wide range I also wanted to tell the

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India story um we are a country of 140

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CR people uh we are uh um we have 400

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news channels in India um but we did not

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have a a global voice as it were so we

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wanted to tell our own story to the

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world and not depend on someone else to

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do that and in my own own small way sort

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of that's what I tried to do uh we still

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have a long way to go but I guess we've

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made a start we've done incredibly well

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so far my goodness so what about um some

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of the big interviews can you share with

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us any of the big interviews or breaking

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news stories that have been memorable in

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your career that you've really enjoyed

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or you you know you were proud to be a

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part of that

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moment there have been so many sorry

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quite a difficult question been so many

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um I I I think

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uh the big interview one of them I I did

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in Dubai that was Peres mhar he was the

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former president of of uh Pakistan and

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the Army Chief I think that was quite an

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interesting interview you I wouldn't say

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one story is is more exciting than the

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other because we tell the stories that

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excite us anyway uh but off late uh so

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last month I was in I was in um Israel

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um just after the the the conflict began

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the year before I was in Ukraine uh to

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see what was happening and um when

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you're there on the ground and you talk

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to people then you then you get a

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perspective that you do not get while

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you're sitting in your studio and you

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realize that it's so easy for us to sit

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every night and say this is the death

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toll and this is what has happened and

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these are the trends but when you've

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been there then then you see how it

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touches lives and it can be very moving

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and it shapes you as an individual you

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know all of those things uh so being on

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the ground I can imagine is very very

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different yeah because where where we're

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just getting numbers and you sort of

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become in tune to what you're sort of

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watching and yeah being on the ground

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and actually seeing suffering like that

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must be very very different that and

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sometimes you you you see you see Trend

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that is building I think I think me too

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was one such um movement of sorts that

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was supported a lot by the media we did

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not have any ground reports as it were

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uh but but there was or or the big

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anti-corruption movement that we had in

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India you know when you when you're part

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of those events then you you see history

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shaping in front of your very eyes and

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and you feel that there is there has to

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be a a bigger purpose to what you're

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doing than just just telling the news I

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mean you are you're actually

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shaping um your story and that of your

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your country or your people you're

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making history at the end of the day

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yeah or you you're chronicling it yeah

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chronicling your history exactly um

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let's go back to um Financial

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Independence so I was reading a

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staggering 62% of women uh of Indian

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women don't have a bank account and

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you've been quoted as saying that

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Financial independence of financial

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well-being is the key to women

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empowerment so what does women

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empowerment mean to you and why is that

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so important when it comes to financial

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Independence I think

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um 6 62 you said thought I thought I

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thought 80% of Indian women have bank

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accounts but but it's not as much as men

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obviously and it's better than the

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global average yeah uh for India is that

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right is it better than the global

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average he say of course I know that but

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uh but I think uh in India or I don't

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know about other societies but women

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have a way of saving which is not

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documented in formal structures so you a

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lot we are the biggest consumers of gold

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and that is a form of security for women

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and they you know stash away some money

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but but that money is just just there

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it's it's not investment it's just a a

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saving for a rainy day and it's it's

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their understanding of security uh I

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think even for women who have jobs and

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who are earning their own money are not

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managing

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it I have a I have a friend who runs a

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podcast on financial advice and she told

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me that a lot of a lot of middle-aged

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women in India um are now being struck

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with two DS that is debt and divorce and

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then when they're on their own with a

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big debt they do not know they've never

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manage their finances and so she's

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telling them to take charge of and it it

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can't be so difficult and I think I

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think financial literacy is is a life

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skill that should be taught in schools

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to

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everyone uh but especially to women uh

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because because we need to know what

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what we're doing with what we have um so

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I think I think Financial Independence

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is very important and we need to uh to

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to I

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guess it's it's not on anyone's priority

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list not that I know of so oh it's not

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is it still something that's just sort

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of Left Behind because as you said you

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know there's Financial Independence but

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then as you said there's financial

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literacy which is completely different I

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suppose so it's yeah instilling that at

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a very early age isn't it yes and other

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than financial Independence what else do

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you think is needed for sort of women

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empowerment when it comes to being more

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independent and becoming more I don't

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know yeah Independence I

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suppose I think it would help to have

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more women leaders because they can

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Inspire others um I think um in schools

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and colleges uh women tend to do better

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academically at least in India they do

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than boys but then somewhere along the

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the way they drop out of the workforce

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because their career cycle and their

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biological Cycles clash and a lot of

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them

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choose their family or whatever it is

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that they're doing and that's that's

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their choice but I'm saying that the we

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don't have a pipeline of leaders to draw

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from then after a certain point so we

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need that we also need networks that

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support

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women um to to pick a career of their

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choice

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um there's there are old boys clubs

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there aren't such clubs or groups for

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women that enable them to make the

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choices that they want and grow and uh

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they typically do not get the kind of

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investment uh there was a very

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interesting study that was done I don't

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know I think it was in the US where uh

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the same investment pitch was made in a

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man's voice and the same one was made in

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a woman's voice and the one with a man's

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voice got more takers so I think these

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are inbuilt biases and uh it won't it

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won't change overnight and what we need

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to do then is to co-opt men and women in

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this journey of of transformation

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because we cannot change biology but we

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can certainly transform our society and

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what it expects of us that's what we

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were talking about one of the previous

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panels actually is like do you think

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there should be blind pitching when it

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comes to entrepreneurship and trying to

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raise money and as you said a male voice

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got got will interest so I mean

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obviously it's a it's a sad moment in

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time where you've got to do blind sort

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of pitching and things but yeah it's

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very interesting that uh that the male

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voice got that through though really

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interesting um uh what sort of education

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and policy needs to be further developed

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in order to sort of help promote more

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financial literacy from the bottom up

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sort of in within the education system

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do you think a lot more needs to be done

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and what what sort of active role do

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would you like to see government sort of

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play to change the the playing

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field education policy I I'm not sure

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I'm the best person to talk about how it

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should change like I said financial

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literacy should be introduced but uh I

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was I was part of uh some conversations

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uh around G20 on women empowerment and

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we had we had women leaders from various

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countries all G20 members in India a

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couple of months back uh and ministers

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and one of the interesting things uh

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that came out with stem education that

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more girls need to be encouraged to take

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up science technology engineering and

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math

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because the the job market is going to

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change and it'll be more technology

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oriented but uh I don't know if it's

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because of biases I don't know if it's

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because women think or girls think that

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they will do better in Humanities which

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is okay if that's what they want to

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study but but there has to be an active

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um intervention uh to encourage girls to

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to pick up those subjects stem education

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is is the way forward for for them to be

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able to more to to become more eligible

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for the kind of jobs that we'll have in

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the near future the future jobs CU I was

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um I did an interview with uh the I

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think it was the the one of the chiefs

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of L'Oreal and she was saying you know

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more and more women and girls you in

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stem education but a lot of them fall

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short after they sort of uh graduate and

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they get their degrees and they do quite

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well at it they either fall short from

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sort of family pressures you see and so

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they can never extend their careers so

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it's how how to sort of balance that

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going through and past sort of higher

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education and actually putting it into

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practice as well is like apparently a

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very big thing as well and some of this

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data is very very disheartening like the

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gender pay gap for instance you know the

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best agencies in the world say that it's

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going to take 136 years or 140 years to

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close that gap which tells us how slow

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our progress is a couple of years back I

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remember there was a study that that

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came out that said that women who do

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unpaid work or work at home if that were

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to be Quantified and paid for it would

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be some1

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trillion and if those women were to make

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a country they would have the third

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highest GDP in the world my goodness so

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they are contributing and if if you were

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to add it to

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the

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the the contribution that is converted

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into money then women would be

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contributing much higher to the global

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GDP so I I think that there needs to be

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more awareness to what women are are

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bringing to

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society um and they need to be

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compensated for that 100% very well said

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um very quickly what would you say I

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want to talk about who your role model

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is in in a minute um but first of all

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anyone that sort of in our audience here

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today or anyone watching online of

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course you've got a big online audience

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what what's of words of advice do you

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have for sort of younger women that are

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looking to get into journalism that

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maybe you'd wished that you'd known

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before getting into this

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field I wish I'd known before getting to

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this field how would you have navigated

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it better do you

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think if that's possible of um I don't

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know you need to uh you need

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to make the best case for yourself you

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have to Market yourself no one else is

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going to do that for you I think that

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but but uh my first advice to anybody

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would be to read and to educate yourself

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because that's what is going to stand

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you in good stead no matter what you do

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and it's very important uh because uh

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especially as journalists we uh we

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struggle with timelines we we are always

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faced with a stiff deadline and we have

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to

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deliver um so it helps if you have some

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basic understanding of a subject and you

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can't do it overnight it's a process

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that takes years and there is no

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shortcut to it so you have to you have

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to do it and it can be it can be

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daunting in the beginning but eventually

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you're better off for it and you you

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like what you've done the kind of work

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that you've put in so I think it's very

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important to do your own reading to

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research to arm yourself with knowledge

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uh because then you know that that you

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cannot be short changed and journalism

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is not for the faint-hearted is it it is

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not it is not it can be U um I mean you

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ask the the junior most reporters on the

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field they're they're sent on a they

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usually given education or crime that's

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why you start as reporters and crime

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reporting can be tough because you're

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thrown into all sorts of situations you

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see all kinds of scenes which can be

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blood curdling and uh initially some of

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those stories stay with you for very

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long slowly you become more cynical and

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you learn to process it and you know

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that you don't have to become very

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emotionally attached the first time I

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went

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into a refugee's house

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it it stayed with me for

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months and then I had to learn to tell

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myself that I'm not part of that

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story I can only tell the story but I do

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not have to go and and find a school for

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those kids yeah that's not what I'm here

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for so I think I think it takes time to

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become more rational about the subjects

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that you're dealing with and they're not

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easy I mean you learn every day um and

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and sometimes it's

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It's upsetting because when you're

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talking about stories like

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hunger they're not as exciting as

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War so so you see people switching off

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mentally or physically um and that's not

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nice because you you you're telling

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you're telling about the hardships that

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a huge section of our population is

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going through so I think the challenge

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is to to make it more interesting and

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palatable and exciting all stories are

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not like that but that's what we do and

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at the same time growing a very thick

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skin at the same time exactly and making

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sure that you're not obviously you're

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not a part of the story you're telling

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the story as you said yeah very quickly

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we've got one second to go but I really

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want to know who your sort of

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inspiration is who do you look up to and

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it's very important as we were saying

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across this forum that it's very

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important to have a role model and a

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mentor so who is that for

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you for me I think it's my mother uh she

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got married at a very early early age

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she gave herself an educ she was

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studying and taking a formal degree till

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I was in high school and she was doing

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it with everything else and she was a

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teacher she was raising us and she was

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studying herself and she's taught us to

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be to be true to our values and just

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just take a shot and see where it takes

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you so I think it takes um it takes a

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lot of grit um and I see and she's not

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her story is not unique but that's

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that's I think what what inspires me and

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I hope that I can leave that behind for

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my own daughter so I think she she's

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always inspired me that way and she's

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she's had a very positive approach to

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life which is hard to emulate very nice

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we cannot thank you enough for for

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making time for us here at the India

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global forum 2023 ladies and gentlemen

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py shama thank

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[Applause]

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[Music]

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you

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