AI vs Artists - The Biggest Art Heist in History

Yes I'm a Designer
1 Mar 202444:22

Summary

TLDRThe video discusses the impact of AI image generators like Midjourney on artists. It explores concerns around copyright infringement and data scraping, with models trained on billions of images without consent. The speaker argues this is hurting artists directly by allowing easy mimicry of unique styles. They examine ethical issues like impersonation and generated fake content. Overall, they advocate careful, selective use of AI art to avoid jeopardizing creative futures or discouraging emerging talent through over-automation. The video calls for transparency, consent, and compensation around training data as well as human review of AI art laws.

Takeaways

  • 😮 Generative AI models like Midjourney are trained on billions of images scraped from the internet without consent, including artists' copyrighted work
  • 😢 Artists feel their unique styles are being stolen by AI to generate images, while they receive no compensation or credit
  • 😠 There are no regulations restricting companies from scraping copyrighted content for AI training data
  • 😕 AI-generated art saturates online spaces, making it harder to trust content and appreciate human creatives
  • 😊 Ethical models like Adobe's train on stock image libraries with creator consent and compensation
  • 👀 Tools like Nightshade and Glaze can help creators poison-pill images to protect against scraping
  • 🤔 Contributing images to AI models may enable style mimicry and involuntary data laundering
  • 😔 Young artists feel hopeless seeing AI instantly achieve aesthetics that took them years to develop
  • ⚖️ Clear legislation is needed around transparency, consent, and compensation for AI training data
  • 😌 Human creativity, skill, and vision will likely regain dominance as AI art becomes industrialized junk food content

Q & A

  • What are some of the main concerns artists have regarding AI image generators?

    -Artists are concerned that their work is being scraped from the internet without consent and used to train AI models. This allows companies to profit from their work without compensation or credit. There are also concerns about potential reputation damage, forgery, and identity theft.

  • How does AI art affect young and aspiring artists?

    -Many young artists feel hopeless and discouraged because AI can generate quality artwork with little effort, making them question spending years honing their skills. This could negatively impact the number of people who pursue art as a career.

  • What are some solutions proposed to make AI art more ethical?

    -Solutions include only using work from artists who consented, providing royalties and compensation, cataloging generated images to make them traceable, banning direct style mimicry, and requiring a mix of at least two art styles.

  • How does AI art affect perception of what is considered quality art?

    -Seeing a lot of AI art online will make people assume most art is AI-generated. This means great human artists may not get recognition, as people doubt the authenticity of art from new and emerging artists.

  • Why can AI art not be copyrighted in its current form?

    -The last step of creative expression is done by the AI model based on the prompt, not the person typing the prompt. Without human authorship and creativity, AI art cannot be copyrighted under current laws.

  • What are some flaws in believing AI art democratizes art?

    -Most AI artists want to copyright their own work and profit from it commercially. The art community has always welcomed beginners, so there have not been major barriers to entry other than dedication and practice.

  • How does generative AI threaten the appreciation of art?

    -AI art is fast, cheap consumerism rather than something contemplated and appreciated. Losing the connection between art and the artist's skills, efforts, experiences and feelings removes meaning and value.

  • What are examples of companies taking an ethical stance on AI art?

    -Some companies like Procreate explicitly avoid integrative AI to focus on empowering human creativity. Others like Adobe and Shutterstock are transparent about using only consented data in training.

  • What skills do human artists have that AI lacks?

    -Humans have skills AI lacks like true creativity, surprise, conveying thoughts and feelings, and the ability to make glorious mistakes that lead to breakthroughs. This will keep human art valuable.

  • How can artists with influence make a difference regarding AI art?

    -Influential artists can speak out about concerns over losing the option to pursue art as a career, and discouragement of young artists. They can value human skill and creativity in their own work.

Outlines

00:00

🎨 Generative AI's Impact on Art and Copyright

This section highlights the concerns of artists and creators about generative AI, such as MidJourney and OpenAI's Sora, which create art and videos from text prompts. It discusses the ethical and legal issues surrounding the use of massive datasets like LAION-5B, which contains billions of images without the consent of the original creators, to train AI models. The potential for these technologies to undermine copyright laws and the creative process is a significant concern, as AI can replicate styles and produce art that competes with human artists, raising questions about originality, compensation, and the future of creativity.

05:01

🔍 The Business Perspective and Ethical Concerns in AI

This paragraph addresses the predominantly business-first approach in discussions about AI, highlighting the need for a more inclusive perspective that includes artists and creators in the decision-making process. It critiques the practices of companies like Mid Journey for using copyrighted images without permission, likening the impact of generative AI on artists to the disruptions caused by file-sharing services on the music industry. The emphasis is on the potential of generative AI to not only use artists' work without compensation but to replace them entirely, raising ethical concerns about the sustainability of creative professions.

10:02

👥 The Personal Toll on Artists and Style Mimicry

Focusing on the personal stories of artists affected by AI's ability to mimic styles, this paragraph illustrates the emotional and financial impact on creators who see their unique styles replicated without consent or compensation. It introduces the concept of 'consistent styles' by platforms like Mid Journey, which exacerbates the issue by allowing users to generate art in any artist's style, further blurring the lines between original work and AI-generated content. The discussion also covers the inadequate responses by AI companies to copyright infringement, highlighting the broader implications for artists' rights and recognition.

15:03

🤖 Ethical Dilemmas and the Future of Artistic Creation

This section delves into the ethical quandaries posed by generative AI, including the manipulation of data to create art that mimics specific styles, raising questions about originality and copyright. It discusses the impact of AI on the value of human creativity and the potential for AI to saturate the market with content that lacks the depth and authenticity of human-made art. The text also examines the implications for emerging artists and the importance of ethical considerations in the development and use of AI technologies in creative fields.

20:04

🌐 The Proliferation of AI-Generated Content and Copyright Issues

Exploring the widespread distribution of AI-generated images and their impact on digital platforms and stock image libraries, this section highlights the challenge of distinguishing between human and AI-created content. It points out the transparency efforts by companies like Adobe with its Firefly model, trained on a unique dataset, and contrasts this with the broader issue of non-consensual use of copyrighted materials. The discussion extends to the implications for copyright law, artist compensation, and the need for ethical standards in AI-generated content.

25:06

👓 Perception of Reality and the Value of Human-Created Art

This paragraph reflects on how generative AI affects the public's perception of art and reality, suggesting that the abundance of AI-generated images could numb people's appreciation for the intricacies of human-made art. It emphasizes the importance of the creative process and the unique experiences and emotions that artists bring to their work, which AI cannot replicate. The text argues that while AI art may offer accessibility and instant gratification, it lacks the depth and personal touch that characterize human creativity, potentially leading to a devaluation of genuine artistic talent and effort.

30:09

🚀 The Debate on Generative AI's Ethical Use and Copyright Reform

Discussing the ongoing debate over the ethical use of generative AI and the need for copyright reform, this section outlines the views of various stakeholders on how to address the challenges posed by AI in creative industries. It explores potential solutions like consent-based training datasets, compensation for artists, and stricter copyright laws to prevent data laundering and style mimicry. The text underscores the importance of transparency, accountability, and responsible innovation in the development of generative AI tools to ensure they complement rather than compromise human creativity.

35:11

🌟 Prospects for Ethical Generative AI and Creative Futures

Looking towards the future, this section examines the potential for developing ethical generative AI that respects artists' rights and contributes positively to creative industries. It discusses the efforts of companies like Adobe and initiatives like the Content Authenticity Initiative to integrate ethical principles into AI development. The paragraph emphasizes the importance of legislative action, community standards, and technological solutions to ensure that AI serves as a tool for enhancing human creativity rather than undermining it, preserving the opportunity for future generations to pursue art as a viable career.

40:13

🎭 The Importance of Human Creativity in the Age of AI

Concluding the discussion, this paragraph champions the irreplaceable value of human creativity and the unique qualities that human artists bring to their work, which AI cannot replicate. It reflects on the role of discipline, passion, and hard work in the creative process, using the example of PewDiePie's art journey to inspire and encourage artists. The text argues against the notion that AI can or should replace human creativity, advocating instead for a future where technology supports and enhances the artistic expression, ensuring that art remains a meaningful and vibrant part of human culture.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡generative AI

Generative AI refers to artificial intelligence systems that can generate new content, such as images, videos, text, etc. The video focuses extensively on image generation systems like DALL-E and Midjourney that can create realistic images based on text prompts. It discusses concerns around these systems being trained on copyrighted or inappropriate data as well as legal and ethical issues around mimicry of artist styles.

💡training data

The data used to train generative AI models - often large datasets of images, text, videos etc scraped from the internet without much curation. The video argues this training data likely contains copyrighted art, inappropriate content etc and that artists should have consented and been compensated.

💡data laundering

The process of taking data that was scraped without permission, transforming it (like compression) and then claiming it is legitimate to use to train AI models commercially. The video argues this is how stolen artist work ends up training generative models.

💡artistic style

The distinctive visual style of a particular artist. The video discusses AI concerns around models not just copying styles but also perfectly mimic specific artists using few reference images, potentially damaging their careers.

💡consent

Permission given by artists for their work to be used in AI training data and models. The video argues consent is not properly taken from artists currently.

💡copyright

The legal ownership and rights over creative work. Copyright law does not properly cover AI-generated mimicry of artist work currently. The video recommends updated legislation to empower artists.

💡compensation

Payment to artists for commercial use of their work in training AI models and generating profit from their styles. The video argues proper compensation currently does not occur.

💡transparency

Being open about what data is used to train AI models. The video recommends model training datasets should be fully transparent about included data.

💡ethics

Principles of morally right behavior. As AI artwork increases, the video discusses dilemmas around ethical use of these models and data vs profit-seeking at any cost.

💡regulation

Laws and government oversight governing use of new technology like AI. The video argues better regulation is needed around generative models and data practices.

Highlights

AI models are designed to generate new images similar to what they have seen during their training.

The more distinct an artist's style is the more successfully AI can mimic it.

The real appreciation of art comes from valuing the process of the artist, not just the final work.

Looking at generated images is numbing your senses and distorting your perception of reality.

Relying mainly on generative AI to make money is not going to last long even if the creator tries to hide the AI use.

Without an AI tool, most AI artists wouldn't be able to even come close to their generated images.

The companies behind social platforms are baiting users with pretty AI pictures and videos, harvesting their attention and selling it to advertisers.

Generating images, videos, music, 3D objects and everything else will quickly lose its novelty and hype.

The real danger of generative AI is its effect on up-and-coming artists. Many talents may have already been lost to discouragement.

I want a future where there's an option to pursue art as a career. I want kids to want to draw, want to create, want to make things that mean something to them.

Drawing is a visual language, a form of communication. Just because a robot can speak doesn't mean we should stop speaking.

Generative AI models are devouring art in order to mimic greatness created by artists, but they will never have a soul or feelings to express.

At some point human art is going to be valued higher than AI art. AI will always be second rate.

There will be a constant race to identify real human creativity versus something that just came out of a pixel predictor.

We're putting the whole creative future of humanity at risk with generative AI because it's not just skipping fundamentals, it's skipping the emotional journey of learning.

Transcripts

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I've seen a lot of my friends just

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suffering because their work is so

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prominent and they struggled for 10

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years or more trying to get their Style

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just to see someone else parading

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wearing their face and parading it right

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there is nothing stopping ad companies

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from taking whatever you own from the

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internet downloading it and putting into

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their training model nothing really

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we're putting the whole creative future

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of humanity at risk here in the last

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couple of weeks I spoke to many amazing

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artists and scientists about my mixed

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feelings of generative AI join me to

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hear their thoughts my advice to

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creators and predictions on what's to

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come I will be perfectly honest with you

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I am equally fascinated and terrified by

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generative AI as a graphic designer

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illustrator and educator I try to stay

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on top of any new technology and tool

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that helps self-expression and

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creativity I still remember the first

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time I saw the potential in AI use for

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creating art it was in 2018 when I saw

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the example Scott Eaton achieved using

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his model trained exclusively on his own

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photography data set from his body's in

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motion project I never thought that by

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2024 we will have tools like mid Journey

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that can generate photorealistic images

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indistinguishable from real photos or

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art and tools like open AI Sora capable

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of generating ultra realistic videos

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from Tex prom

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by now most likely you are familiar with

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how AI images are generated but in case

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you are not let me give you a very brief

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and extremely simplified summary you

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type in a few words your prompt

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describing what you want to see and the

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AI model generates images for you that

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never existed before for this process to

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work well the AI module needs to be

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trained on a massive amount of images

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and their descriptions at the moment the

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most effective and most widely used data

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set Layon 5B includes

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5.85 billion uncurated images cwed from

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publicly available websites and Cloud

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storages this data set was meant for

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research purposes only but companies

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started to utilize it commercially

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within a few months after its release

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there are all kinds of images in this

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data set from public domain pictures to

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a staggering amount of copyrighted work

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of both dad and living artists and a

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fair amount of explicit content too the

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creators of this data set didn't get

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consent from anyone while collecting

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these images there was no opt-in or opt

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out but since it was meant for research

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purposes only it didn't seem to violate

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anyone's rights you can get a better

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idea of the effectiveness and sheer

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amount of scraping that was used to

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generate Layon 5B data set by going to

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have iben tred.com website you can

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search the entire training data using

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someone's name a domain name or even a

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keyword for instance you can find out

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how many images of elephants were

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scraped off the internet and you can

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start to see why AI models can generate

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images of elephants from any angle and

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in any artistic style this is like

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scanning someone's brain to see how well

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they remember how an elephant looks only

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artists with extraordinary visual memory

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like the late Kim jangi can come close

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to this level of familiarity and

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comprehension of a subject matter

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without going into the technicalities of

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how deep learning and stable diffusion

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works here are some important things to

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understand about text to image

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generative AI models they are designed

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to generate new images similar to what

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they have seen during their training

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once a model is trained on an image it

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cannot unsee it it is a bit like human

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memory but much more accurate and

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extensive a bit like photographic memory

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paired with unlimited storage capacity

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to improve the speed of the generation

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process all images that are fed into the

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AI model are compressed now this

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compressed form of the image or latent

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image looks like noise to us but the

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model is capable of reversing it back to

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a recognizable almost identical image as

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the original input this transformation

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between the original image and the

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recovered image after the def Fusion

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process is crucial as this is used as an

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excuse by AI companies to get around

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existing copyright laws and to allow

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them to cheat artists out of their

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rightful

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compensation you may have heard of the

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term data laundering it involves

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transforming stolen data so that it can

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be used for legitimate purposes in this

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instance the original data 5.85 billion

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images was collected from the web by

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nonprofit research groups and then

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shared with for-profit companies most

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people who are having the AI discussion

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are unfortunately starting from a

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business first mindset so all of the

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ideas all of the discussion about what

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should be legal what should not be legal

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our discussions are sort of framed

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around companies that want to scale up

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to the millions to billions of dollars

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of Revenue right and if if you're going

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to be that kind of company I don't think

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you can just have a charismatic CEO at

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the top who thinks that they have

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perfectly understood the future of

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technology and that for some reason

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thinks their fairh handed handling of

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this situation is going to assure the

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best outcomes for everybody no you need

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boards that are made up of actual

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artists right not just um not not just

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technology people who stumbled upon a

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code that happens to make art you need

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people who are really sort of outside of

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the situation real stakeholders um to

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help guide these organizations creators

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of mid Journey one of the most popular

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text to image generators have been

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recently CAU discussing laundering

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copyrighted images whilst training their

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AI model many scientists who worked on

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developing AI Technologies are also

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disillusioned by the predatory practices

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of AI companies used to harm individuals

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and entire Industries there is nothing

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stopping a companies from taking

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whatever you own from the internet

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downloading it and putting into their

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training model nothing really uh there's

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no legal uh statue standing in the way

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there's no regulatory agencies that that

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say this is not allowed but why is it

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such a big deal you might ask that AI

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modules have been trained on copyrighted

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materials how does this affect the

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original

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artists remember what happened to the

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music industry when nepsta first came

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out and then with pretty much every

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other intellectual property once fire

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sharing or torrent sites became

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available I'm talking about movies TV

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shows books software Games Etc although

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pirated content is still widely

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available most Industries found ways to

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combat it mainly by streaming their

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content the main difference however is

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that while torrent sites have been

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hurting mainly large companies and

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Brands generative AI is hurting

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individuals what is worse is that

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generative AI didn't just steal artists

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work it was created in order to replace

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them since we are comparing AI systems

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to torrent sites it's as if you can only

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download the last season of your

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favorite show but even generate any

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number of new episodes or Seasons

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without the consent and input of the

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shows creators if they if they were

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marketing a commercial product that was

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solely based on people who opted in they

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wouldn't have a very competitive product

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they wouldn't have a product that would

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compete directly with artists right and

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like you know this they want to tell

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people it's a tool and it's a tool for

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artists but it's not it's it's meant as

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a replacement for artists because

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they're trying to directly compete with

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artists in the same market right that is

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not a tool that is a replacement the

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only way to have a very competitive

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extremely competitive product that has

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the best imagery is to scrape from

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everyone and anyone one of the main

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arguments of people using generative AI

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tools is that their generated images

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only look similar to existing real

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artwork that was used to train the AI

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models they compared this ability of

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mimicking other people's work to how

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artists find inspiration and references

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here is what l v bar or Lo wrote about

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this many have compared image generators

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to human artists seeking out inspiration

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these two are not the same my art is

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literally being fed into these

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generators through the data sets and

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spat back out of a program that has no

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inherent sense of what is respectful to

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artists as long as my art is literally

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integrated into the system Ed to create

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the images it is commercial use of my

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art without my consent there are

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dedicated websites like this one to help

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people easily copy any artist style

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using mid Journey you can consider these

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style cataloges for people who are lazy

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to even research and get to know the

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artist they would want to copy Bobby CH

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put it this way in his video ai's

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ability to copy my style is kind of like

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after I spent all this effort to climb a

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mountain once I get to a top everyone

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else just pops up with the you know

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taking selfies on top of this mountain

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right beside you and you know that if

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you didn't climb the mountain then none

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of the others could either yet the only

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compensation that's given is to the AI

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company even though without my artwork

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as well none of this would be possible

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they're just looking at something and

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they're they're thinking that looks cool

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um who did that I'm going to keep

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prompting stuff by lowish right then

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that's not you're not learning anything

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you're just kind of you know it's cool

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you don't understand why it's cool and

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you just kind of want to keep generating

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more of it so that that to me feels like

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you're not really benefiting from

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anything you're kind of just you know

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pulling the slot machine for more for

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more results but I've seen a lot of my

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friends just suffering because their

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work is so PR and they struggled for 10

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years or more trying to get their Style

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just to see someone else parading

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wearing their face and parading it right

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you might wonder what happens if you

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want to mimic a specific less known

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artist style and M Journey doesn't

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recognize their name when you're using

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it in your prompts well mid Journey

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recently introduced a feature called

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consistent Styles which makes it even

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easier to mimic anyone's style let me

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demonstrate this quickly here are some

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illustrations my good friend George ton

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created

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using one or two of these as style

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references mid Journey can closely

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emulate George's style and the whole

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process takes less than a minute within

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an hour anyone can generate hundreds of

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detailed illustrations in George's

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unique artistic style what this means is

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that even if his work wasn't scraped in

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the first place and used to train the AI

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model the uploaded style references will

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help to identify similar artwork in the

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database and use that to generate

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something very similar I don't know if

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the uploaded images by the user are then

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automatically added to the AI models

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training data but I'm pretty sure they

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are used in some way to improve it if

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that is the case then users become

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complicit in data laundering without

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their knowledge here is what Patrick

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Brown has to say about style mimicry

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when I confronted him with generated

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images using mid Journey's consistent

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Style featur

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when I saw this I was kind of surprised

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very shocked each of these were probably

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just made within seconds compared to if

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I was to draw something like this maybe

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like this one I would spend probably at

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least 3 days probably pulling this

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together maybe four or five including

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the background for sure like that

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background very detailed you know it

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does look very

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aiish but to the average eye I think it

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would just pass as a the usual kind of

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Spider-Man artwork or just a piece you

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would have thought that it would have

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been done by an artist so it's very

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scary and I don't like that side of AI

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to be honest especially when you aim at

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a certain artist and say Hey I want to

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get this style and then create a full

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picture and out of thin air it really

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does suck to have your name or your art

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style kind of siphoned off and like put

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through a filter and generated and spit

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it out in few a few seconds you know

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there is a short paragraph about

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stealing someone's intellectual property

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in mid Journey's terms of service if you

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knowingly infringe someone else's

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intellectual property and that cost us

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money we are going to come find you and

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collect that money from you we might

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also do other stuff like try to get a

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court to make you pay our legal fees

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don't do it Sam does Arts explained the

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dangers of AI imitating anyone's work

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when AI Generations are made to look

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like an artist's work this has the

play13:35

potential for reputation damage for

play13:37

forgery for fraud for identity theft and

play13:40

what's most concerning is that when

play13:41

these models are trained on images of

play13:43

your artwork they are unable to forget

play13:45

so almost all of these models are now

play13:47

working with tainted data their

play13:49

Generations now all involve copyrighted

play13:52

content which has been gathered without

play13:53

the knowledge or permission of the

play13:55

copyright owner it is directly hurting

play13:57

artists who have put their passion and

play13:59

their soul into everything that they

play14:01

create only for their work to be scraped

play14:03

from the internet without their

play14:04

permission and used in training AI

play14:06

models the unfortunate Paradox is that

play14:08

the more distinct an artist style is the

play14:11

more successfully AI can mimic it

play14:14

Additionally the more complex and

play14:16

detailed an artwork is the more likely

play14:18

people will think it is made by AI even

play14:21

when it's not so generated images

play14:24

mimicking someone's style is not only

play14:26

plagiarizing the artist but also makes

play14:29

people doubt the authenticity of any

play14:32

future or past work created by the

play14:35

artist I've been looking at at for I

play14:38

don't know the past 20 years or so in my

play14:39

life and yeah sure sometimes there are

play14:42

dead giveaways about like oh it's too

play14:44

smooth or does this and that but like

play14:47

for what you're showing here especially

play14:49

with their consistency update it's it's

play14:52

scary like it's it's truly scary you

play14:55

take someone like gabs for example and

play14:58

and you just want to emulate his style

play15:00

you want it for a cover you want it

play15:02

for an illustration for a movie poster

play15:05

right you just you take a few more

play15:07

examples double it triple the uh the

play15:10

amount that you that you use for

play15:11

consistency and all of a sudden you have

play15:13

even better results so I think it's

play15:16

tremendous tremendously scary because

play15:18

it's so good this AI ethics Spectrum

play15:22

demonstrates really well how exact style

play15:25

mimicry is ethically and morally the

play15:27

worst thing you can use generative AI

play15:29

for especially when used to profit

play15:32

commercially from the generated images

play15:35

Dana Executive Vice President general

play15:38

counsel and chief trust officer at Adobe

play15:41

said this in his interview with neai

play15:43

Patel from the word there's no such

play15:46

thing as style protection in copyright

play15:48

law right now that you can't protect

play15:50

that there's that's not a concept so

play15:52

we've uh We've introduced in the same

play15:54

sen of testimony you refer to earlier

play15:56

this idea of a federal anti-

play15:57

impersonation right and the idea of that

play16:00

is it would give artists a right to

play16:01

enforce against people who are

play16:03

intentionally impersonating their work

play16:05

for commercial gain is it still possible

play16:08

to share anything online without

play16:09

worrying about feeding a generative AI

play16:12

model with your work Ben Xiao professor

play16:14

of computer science and his team at the

play16:16

University of Chicago created two

play16:19

interesting tools that can help protect

play16:21

your digital images stored online so n

play16:23

shade is trying to help give some power

play16:25

back to the to the content owners um

play16:28

against people who don't care about

play16:30

licensing who don't care about ownership

play16:33

who don't care about copyright uh it is

play16:35

a small poison pill you can put inside

play16:37

your art um it works very similar to

play16:40

glaze except where glaze is modifying

play16:44

what the AI model sees in terms of

play16:46

artistic style Nightshade works by

play16:50

changing what the AI model sees in terms

play16:52

of composition so instead of you know

play16:54

seeing a cow in a you know Green pasture

play16:57

it sees a big leather handbag uh sitting

play16:59

on a grassy Hill right so um each art

play17:04

piece can be equipped with a small

play17:06

poison pill um in such a way that if

play17:09

enough of it gets collected and gets

play17:11

trained by the same model then that

play17:13

model will start to get very confused

play17:15

about what is a cow it will think that a

play17:17

cow has a nice leathery handle and you

play17:20

know shiny buckles um and those kind of

play17:22

things AI is not only saturating the

play17:25

internet with unreliable fake content

play17:28

that's free to access but also in the

play17:31

form of paid content here is an example

play17:34

of a fake art book that is advertised as

play17:37

a compelling and extensive guide book on

play17:39

drawing people while in reality it is a

play17:42

collection of generated images and

play17:44

generated text with close to zero value

play17:48

to anyone interested in learning to draw

play17:51

fellow YouTuber Jaz dros made a video

play17:53

about this it just goes to show the

play17:57

moral ethic iCal ambiguity of AI now uh

play18:02

and how it's how it's impacting artists

play18:04

I could have paid that $95

play18:07

us to the people who whose style that

play18:11

was based on or or it was used you know

play18:13

I might have bought J Scott Campbell how

play18:15

to draw book you know which I and I've

play18:18

bought some of those I am pretty sure

play18:20

this is just one of many examples of fig

play18:22

books out there just imagine you are

play18:24

learning to drive and you get scammed to

play18:27

learn from a fake book or you get a

play18:29

story book for your child that turns out

play18:31

to be AI generated with hidden flows

play18:34

that will secretly influence your

play18:36

child's imagination or understanding of

play18:39

the world oh wait this already happened

play18:43

how can you protect yourself from fake

play18:44

books only by being extremely Vigilant

play18:48

but it is going to get harder and harder

play18:50

to differentiate generated books from

play18:52

real ones as AI models and workflows

play18:55

improve but it's not just books there

play18:57

are all kinds of generated digital

play19:00

products already out there sites like

play19:02

art station are full of stuff like this

play19:05

massive collections of image references

play19:08

of something very specific like a

play19:10

stylized werewolf head there is a small

play19:14

mention that this product is made with

play19:16

the help of AI meaning it's nothing more

play19:19

than a library of curated generated

play19:22

images at least here they were not lying

play19:25

about the use of AI stock sites are also

play19:28

Ed with generated images to see the

play19:30

scale of proliferation it's worth

play19:32

checking the ratio between real images

play19:35

compared to generated images on some of

play19:37

the popular stock sites shut stock for

play19:40

instance currently has around 5 million

play19:43

AI generated images which sounds like a

play19:45

lot but it only amounts to

play19:48

1.15% of its entire Library compared to

play19:51

this free pick went all in with AI

play19:54

images a staggering

play19:57

42.7% out of their 121 million stock

play20:01

images are generated I have to give it

play20:04

to them though that they are being

play20:05

completely transparent about this and

play20:08

they make it super convenient to filter

play20:10

for AI images even based on which model

play20:13

they were generated in and whether their

play20:16

original prompt is available or not out

play20:19

of the 400 million stock images

play20:21

currently on Adobe stock 10.1% are AI

play20:25

generated contributors have to indicate

play20:28

if their image was created using AI

play20:30

tools and whether people or property in

play20:33

the images are fictional here is one of

play20:35

their guidelines for generative AI

play20:37

content don't submit content created

play20:40

using prompts containing other artist

play20:42

names or created using prompts otherwise

play20:46

intended to copy another artist the most

play20:49

interesting thing is that adobe decided

play20:51

to train their generative model Adobe

play20:53

Firefly on a unique data set made up of

play20:57

adobe stock IM images along with openly

play20:59

licensed work and public domain content

play21:02

where copyright has expired I stock by

play21:05

gy images also introduced their own

play21:07

generative AI solution in September 2023

play21:11

partnering with Nvidia which similarly

play21:14

to Adobe Firefly was exclusively trained

play21:17

on their own stock Library these two

play21:19

examples Adobe and gy pro that

play21:22

generative AI models can work without

play21:25

stealing billions of images and being

play21:28

transparent about their training data

play21:30

large stock sites like these were in a

play21:33

unique position that they were sitting

play21:35

on a gold mine from a deep learning

play21:37

point of view they have a huge library

play21:40

of mostly high quality and high

play21:42

resolution images with descriptive

play21:45

titles and tags added by the

play21:47

contributors to make their images easier

play21:49

to find at the moment when comparing

play21:52

Adobe Firefly with mid Journey for

play21:54

instance it's a clear wiin in most cases

play21:57

for Mid Journey in terms of the quality

play21:59

and realism of the output however Adobe

play22:02

is undeniably the more ethical model out

play22:05

of the two flip normals is another great

play22:08

example of a digital Marketplace aimed

play22:10

at 3D artists where the founders Morton

play22:13

and Henning made it clear that

play22:15

contributors can upload and sell a wide

play22:18

variety of content as long as it's not

play22:21

AI generated any AI art uploaded even if

play22:26

given away for free will be taken down

play22:30

relying mainly on generative AI to make

play22:32

money is not going to last long even if

play22:35

the Creator is going to try to hide the

play22:37

fact that they used AI on one hand it is

play22:40

unethical using mid journey is similar

play22:43

to using torrent sites selling work

play22:45

heavily relying on generated images is

play22:48

even worse however it is like selling

play22:51

stuff that you downloaded from torrent

play22:52

sites the creators of AI tools are not

play22:56

directly involved in the of plagiarism

play22:59

they only provide the framework or

play23:01

vehicle for it on the other hand art

play23:04

created with AI is super accessible

play23:08

anyone can do it which means pretty much

play23:10

everyone will use it eventually it

play23:13

reminds me of Google and other search

play23:15

engines when they first came out in the

play23:17

mid '90s and using them to find answers

play23:20

to your questions was like magic it

play23:23

seemed like a unique skill for a while

play23:25

but then it became the norm and now it

play23:27

is as normal to use a search engine as

play23:29

breeding having amazing cameras on our

play23:32

mobile devices didn't automatically turn

play23:35

all of us into professional

play23:37

photographers also randomly taking

play23:40

thousands of photos every day may still

play23:42

not result in any outstanding images

play23:46

generating images videos music 3D

play23:49

objects and everything else that will be

play23:50

possible in the future will quickly lose

play23:53

its novelty and hype and the value of

play23:55

generated art will plummet Jake Parker

play23:58

calls generative AI a new and Incredibly

play24:01

successful form of industrialized art

play24:04

where quantity affordability and speed

play24:07

is the priority over quality and skill

play24:10

previous successful examples of

play24:12

industrialized art are stock sites

play24:15

Fiverr and social media platforms like

play24:17

Pinterest Instagram Tik Tok the

play24:20

companies behind social platforms are

play24:22

baiting users with pretty pictures and

play24:25

videos harvesting their attention and

play24:28

selling it to advertisers they are

play24:30

serving up compact thumbnail size art on

play24:33

a conveyor belt what's worse is that

play24:35

these social platforms are already

play24:37

saturated with AI images and soon AI

play24:40

videos will follow turning them into a

play24:42

Minefield if you're looking for

play24:44

authentic content compared to these

play24:47

other examples of industrialized art

play24:50

generative AI takes things to a whole

play24:52

new level it is a peak example of

play24:56

consumerism it's like the the fast food

play24:58

version of art it's available to

play25:00

everyone it's cheap but it is not good

play25:03

for you while fast food is negatively

play25:05

affecting your physical condition AI art

play25:08

is affecting your mind and how you

play25:10

perceive things that you see looking at

play25:13

generated images is numbing your senses

play25:16

and distorting your perception of

play25:18

reality remember when a piece of art was

play25:21

experienced by staring at it for several

play25:24

minutes and appreciating all its details

play25:27

and imp factions trying to learn its

play25:29

meanings and Mysteries the thoughts and

play25:32

emotions the artist was trying to

play25:34

capture generative images on the other

play25:36

hand serve our impatient Society

play25:40

perfectly we are Highwire or trained to

play25:43

think that looking at anything for more

play25:44

than 2 seconds feels like a waste of

play25:47

time and to be frank that is actually

play25:50

true about most AI art what humans want

play25:53

is like the shortcut like biologically

play25:56

we don't want to do work we don't want

play25:57

to do do hard things because well I mean

play25:59

we burn more calories and if we don't

play26:01

have to we don't want to do that if

play26:03

there was a pill that overnight you

play26:05

would get jacked you would go from being

play26:07

a skinny or a fat guy to like actually

play26:10

like Henri caval in The Witcher kind of

play26:11

level and you would be like sweet now

play26:14

that's done I don't have to spend 10

play26:15

years of my life and 5 hours at a gym

play26:18

per day like you would you would just be

play26:20

there and it's almost like we have that

play26:22

if you have a button to get jacked with

play26:25

in art like what's the point of things

play26:29

right the real appreciation of art comes

play26:31

from valuing the process of the artist

play26:34

not just the time and effort it took

play26:36

them to create a specific piece of art

play26:39

but their entire life experience

play26:42

generative AI removes the process from

play26:44

creation and makes people believe that

play26:47

it offers a shortcut to acquire artistic

play26:49

skills and experience the actual Act of

play26:53

taking a great photo requires much less

play26:55

time than creating a painting of the

play26:57

same sub subject and it could also be

play26:59

considered a shortcut to achieve the

play27:00

same composition however taking great

play27:03

photos still relies on a lot of skills

play27:06

and practice compared to writing a

play27:08

prompt imagine that you have an idea for

play27:10

a painting and you describe it to your

play27:13

friend you also tell her that you don't

play27:15

think you have the time or skills to

play27:17

create it but you would love to see

play27:19

someone else painting it next time you

play27:22

meet your friend shows you a painting

play27:23

that closely resembles what you

play27:25

described she tells you that your idea

play27:28

inspired her and that she worked on it

play27:30

for several days now would you consider

play27:33

yourself to be the artist in this

play27:36

situation this is the same relation

play27:38

between a user and a generative AI tool

play27:40

where the AI is the friend who does the

play27:42

actual work based on your prompt another

play27:45

way to think about this is to imagine a

play27:47

game where you have two options in the

play27:49

main menu to start the game or to see

play27:52

the end of the game the first option

play27:55

would require you to spend dozens of

play27:57

hours of playtime to reach the ending if

play27:59

you decide to choose the second option

play28:01

you could save all that time and effort

play28:04

but would the ending mean anything to

play28:06

you then not only you wouldn't fully

play28:08

understand what's happening but you

play28:10

wouldn't have any emotional ties to any

play28:13

of the characters or events is AI art

play28:16

not just a new type of digital art which

play28:19

when it first became available was

play28:21

considered to be a shortcut to creating

play28:23

art and was looked down on by

play28:25

traditional artists most people had the

play28:28

misconception of digital art being

play28:29

somewhat similar to generative images

play28:32

where you just push a few buttons and a

play28:34

great image pops out but compared to AI

play28:37

art digital art is made by hand and

play28:41

requires a lot of skill to do well most

play28:44

AI artists already look at traditional

play28:47

and digital artists as dinosaurs and

play28:50

saying generative AI is just another

play28:52

tool and those who won't embrace it will

play28:54

fall behind but most of them don't

play28:56

realize is that without an AI tool they

play28:59

wouldn't be able to even come close to

play29:01

their generated images while pre-i

play29:04

artists would be able to make amazing

play29:07

art pretty much with any tool you put in

play29:10

their hands some some people who have

play29:13

who have been into generative AI when

play29:14

they saw the mid Journey artist database

play29:17

they stopped using it right away because

play29:19

they realized what the implications were

play29:21

and they understood that it wasn't their

play29:22

skill it was other people's skills and

play29:26

they just

play29:27

they they understood the the moral

play29:29

implications right other

play29:31

people just turned a blind eye and kept

play29:34

going because it was too painful to

play29:37

understand what was happening and they

play29:38

just wanted to keep spiking their

play29:39

dopamine and they wanted to stay in

play29:41

these um communities without thinking

play29:43

too critically right again this is

play29:46

generalizing but a lot of people who are

play29:47

using these image models never knew who

play29:51

any of us were before which means that

play29:54

their interest in art wasn't that deep

play29:56

mhm it never went that deep to find out

play30:00

who Kim jongi was you know who Greg

play30:03

rowski was who John Singer Sergeant was

play30:05

like none of that right there was no

play30:08

real interest this just became junk food

play30:13

yeah it's and it's it's interest based

play30:16

on dopamine accessibility and

play30:20

addiction right and it's causing harm

play30:23

here is another little experiment for

play30:25

you let's find a few great examples of

play30:28

generated images from mid journey and

play30:30

compare the complexity and

play30:32

sophistication of prompts used to

play30:34

generate them is there a correlation

play30:37

between how detailed The Prompt is and

play30:39

the quality of the generated image in

play30:42

most cases there isn't which proves that

play30:45

there is a huge factor of luck and

play30:48

Randomness involved in generative AI art

play30:51

democratization of art is an interesting

play30:54

but flowed concept most AI artists who

play30:57

who believe in this sentiment however

play30:59

would still prefer to own copyrights for

play31:01

their generated images they don't mind

play31:04

exploiting other artist work but they

play31:06

want their work to be marketable and

play31:08

profit from it there is a big divide

play31:10

between the AI artists and non- AI

play31:13

artists or as jav Lopez founder of

play31:16

magnific AI likes to call them the anti-

play31:19

aai cluster the art community has always

play31:22

been welcoming and helpful to anyone

play31:24

interested to get started or gain skills

play31:27

I hate to see this unjustified hatred

play31:29

towards traditional and digital artists

play31:32

as if they were holding on to their

play31:34

secrets and acting as Gatekeepers

play31:37

thinking that finally now with

play31:39

generative AI anyone can become an

play31:41

artist a lot of people look at this

play31:43

movement as a revolution where the

play31:45

snobby artists are finally getting what

play31:48

they deserve while in reality nothing

play31:50

can be further from the truth at the

play31:52

moment the main reason why big Brands

play31:54

and companies are careful about adopting

play31:57

generated images and videos in their

play31:59

communication is that AI art cannot be

play32:02

copyrighted the US copyright office

play32:04

noted that image generators produce

play32:06

images in an unpredictable way and thus

play32:09

cannot be considered creative or

play32:11

inventive typing in a prompt and having

play32:14

generative AI create the image we don't

play32:16

think that output is copyrightable by

play32:18

itself because we think that the um last

play32:22

step of expression is being done by the

play32:24

AI not you you're typing your prompt

play32:26

you're like you know pink bear riding a

play32:28

bicycle the AI is choosing in the first

play32:31

instance what kind of bear the shade of

play32:33

pink all the things that are supposed to

play32:35

be the expression that the artist is

play32:36

supposed to have in order to get a

play32:38

copyright so we think that just typing

play32:40

in a prompt is probably not going to

play32:43

create a copyrighted blpr the copyright

play32:45

law is quite clear that human authorship

play32:48

is required for copyright adobe's

play32:50

content authenticity initiative and

play32:52

content credentials were created to

play32:55

enable creators to add extra information

play32:57

about themselves and their creative

play32:59

process directly to their content in the

play33:02

form of a new kind of temper evident

play33:04

metadata this could be a solution for

play33:06

proving the ratio between the work

play33:08

achieved by Ai and the human artist but

play33:11

we will have to see how widely it will

play33:13

be accepted and how effective it will

play33:15

become if you're a creative professional

play33:17

you're never satisfied with what comes

play33:19

out of one of these gen of AI um models

play33:22

because it's not exactly what you wanted

play33:24

right you're always going to make it

play33:25

whatever your vision is and it's it's we

play33:27

we referred this the first step in the

play33:29

creative process and all the other steps

play33:32

are going to be catable the opinion on

play33:34

generative AI is extremely divisive and

play33:37

I hope if you ended up watching this

play33:38

video this far you can see why most

play33:41

artists agree that they would consider

play33:43

using AI if the training data was clear

play33:46

of copyright violations using AI is

play33:50

similar to tapping into the collective

play33:52

imagination of humankind and it can be

play33:54

useful for ideation for for the first

play33:57

time you can brainstorm on your own and

play34:00

get surprising ideas you may have never

play34:02

thought of creativity is fueled by the

play34:06

unexpected and AI has no fear of failing

play34:10

so it will often make surprising

play34:11

mistakes that can lead to breakthroughs

play34:14

and Brilliant new ideas Sam Harper said

play34:17

that AI art makes glorious mistakes and

play34:20

therefore makes glorious art he also

play34:23

said that AI is in its early days and

play34:26

it's making lots and lots of mistakes

play34:29

these are the days of AI being a good

play34:31

artist once it gets too good at doing

play34:34

what it was designed for it will no

play34:36

longer make mistakes one question that

play34:39

I'm particularly interested in is

play34:42

whether there is a way to make a

play34:43

completely ethical generative AI tool

play34:47

Adobe has an AI Ethics program for

play34:49

instance following three guiding

play34:52

principles accountability responsibility

play34:55

and transparency which spell art by the

play34:57

way but it can be argued that shoving

play35:00

all of adobe stock into a training data

play35:02

set was not all that ethical since the

play35:05

contributors only found out about this

play35:08

after their images were already used to

play35:10

train Firefly it is also fairly easy to

play35:13

find generated images with copyrighted

play35:16

materials on famous IPS on Adobe stock

play35:19

I'm pretty sure Disney and Nickelodean

play35:22

would not be happy to find out that

play35:23

adobe is licensing their intellectual

play35:26

properties I am sure that adobe is doing

play35:28

its best to filter these out but it's

play35:30

not an easy task when the contributors

play35:33

are trying to be tricky when naming

play35:35

these assets what I hope will happen in

play35:37

the near future is that the L will

play35:39

Define the requirements for generative

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AI data sets so what would an ideal

play35:45

ethical legislation look like for

play35:47

generative AI training data sets to be

play35:51

100%

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transparent only use work in a data set

play35:55

by artists who gave their consent

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royalties and compensation should be

play36:01

paid out to artists who opted in

play36:04

generated images need to be cataloged

play36:06

and easy to track direct or exact style

play36:10

mimicry should not be allowed perhaps

play36:13

the combination of minimum two artist

play36:15

styles could work or simply completely

play36:17

ban the usage of names of creators

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generated images can only be used for

play36:23

reference purposes and fully AI

play36:25

generated work should not be acceptable

play36:28

as a finished concept the UK House of

play36:31

Lords publication on generative AI

play36:33

states that the government should

play36:35

prioritize fairness and responsible

play36:38

Innovation it must resolve disputes

play36:40

definitely including through updated

play36:43

legislation if needed Empower rights

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holders to check if their data has been

play36:48

used without permission and invest in

play36:51

large highquality training data sets to

play36:54

encourage Tech firms to use license

play36:56

material this is a very promising

play36:58

Direction and I hope it won't take long

play37:00

before this gets more traction around

play37:02

the world the real danger of generative

play37:05

AI is the effect it's having on upand

play37:07

cominging artists many talents may have

play37:10

been lost already to discouragement by

play37:12

generative AI many might ask the same

play37:15

question why should I spend over 10,000

play37:18

hours perfecting my skills and repping

play37:20

my head around complex and confusing

play37:22

things like Anatomy perspective and

play37:25

color theory when I can just write a few

play37:28

words and get dozens of beautiful

play37:30

generated images I already assume that

play37:33

every day I'm seeing several AI images

play37:35

that I'm not clocking right the the

play37:38

problem with AI is that you're only

play37:39

noticing the ones that you notice yeah

play37:41

right the ones that are of sufficient

play37:43

quality you're just scrolling right past

play37:44

them you know you're just accepting them

play37:46

for what they are and um I have

play37:50

seen groups of professional artists you

play37:53

know in a sort of formalized way try to

play37:57

see how much can they identify AI art

play38:01

and you know who can get a perfect score

play38:03

right and in a considerable group of

play38:05

artists you know maybe 20 or something

play38:07

like that there's only one person who

play38:09

will clock them all you know there and

play38:11

and most everybody will make some amount

play38:13

of mistakes and not just one so I'm

play38:17

deeply deeply concerned about this I

play38:19

think this problem is only going to get

play38:21

worse and it it's bad for the artists

play38:25

and it's also bad for the atmosphere

play38:28

around Art Online the the issue with

play38:31

stuff like this is that once there's

play38:34

enough of this online and I think we're

play38:35

basically already there you'll just

play38:38

start assuming most stuff is AI and when

play38:41

that happens we're on a slippery slope

play38:43

that I really don't know how we come

play38:44

back from once that happens that's a

play38:46

very bad position to put new artists

play38:49

into and artists who are trying to break

play38:51

in and get popular it's horrible to

play38:54

think that I would be less inclined to

play38:57

recognize them as a a great talent just

play39:00

because I'm like well where did you come

play39:02

from and if you came out of nowhere

play39:03

you're probably AI you know you don't

play39:04

have a natural progression where have

play39:06

you been it's like that is a horrible

play39:08

atmosphere to have around art sharing

play39:11

and the the and and social media I I

play39:14

think that's only going to make us more

play39:16

insular like you said it's going to make

play39:18

us more inclined to only can only

play39:21

interact with the people that we already

play39:23

follow you know it's going to be much

play39:25

harder to on board someone new as a

play39:28

favorite artist or a great artist you

play39:30

know think about the young people right

play39:32

now I get so many comments and messages

play39:34

from people telling me how they feel

play39:36

hopeless there are literally kids out

play39:38

there art babies who are in art schools

play39:41

going through a 4-year program to

play39:42

hopefully work in the industry and they

play39:44

feel like there's no hope for them if

play39:45

you're an artist with a voice with a

play39:47

platform you don't have to do it for

play39:48

yourself do it for the younger

play39:50

generation there are so many people

play39:52

young people who are counting on you I

play39:54

don't know about you guys but I want a

play39:55

future where there's an option to pursue

play39:58

the passion of art as a career I want a

play40:01

future where the kids want to draw want

play40:03

to create want to make things that mean

play40:05

something to them Stan preno or proo in

play40:08

the draftsman podcast said drawing is a

play40:12

visual language it's a form of

play40:15

communication and just because a robot

play40:17

can speak doesn't mean we should stop

play40:19

speaking generative AI models are

play40:22

devouring art in order to come close to

play40:24

the greatness created by real artists

play40:28

but they will never have a soul or

play40:30

feelings to express but I do think that

play40:32

also at some point if not already uh a

play40:35

lot of people and a lot of companies are

play40:39

coming to the realization that human

play40:41

skill matters uh creativity really does

play40:43

matter you know a lot of book covers a

play40:46

lot of Publishers a lot of companies

play40:47

creative companies are already

play40:48

instituting no AI policies how long does

play40:51

it take for AI to become the the sort of

play40:54

the bottom line the minimal version of

play40:57

what we can get and and if you want

play40:59

something that is really surprising and

play41:01

really thought-provoking and challenging

play41:03

you'll still need to come back to humans

play41:05

and at that point I don't know how many

play41:07

human artists will be still thriving but

play41:10

I do think at some point Human Art is

play41:12

going to be value higher than AI are if

play41:14

not already that that AI is always going

play41:16

to be second rate it's always going to

play41:17

be the cheap version when you can't hire

play41:21

someone with real skill and creativity

play41:23

you go back on Mid journey and you get

play41:24

this you know uh something that you can

play41:26

have for 50 cents um and so there's

play41:28

going to be this constant race of how do

play41:30

we tell the difference how do we

play41:31

identify real human skill versus

play41:34

something that just came out of a you

play41:36

know pixel predictor um so that will be

play41:38

interesting to see how it develops and

play41:40

and what kind of tools come up with to

play41:42

to to tell that difference to identify

play41:44

something as you know true human

play41:46

creativity versus uh a copy one of the

play41:49

best things that happened recently on

play41:51

YouTube that demonstrates the beauty and

play41:53

importance of discipline and hard work

play41:56

is the amazing art journey of one of

play41:59

YouTube's biggest influencers PewDiePie

play42:02

Felix decided he was going to improve

play42:04

his drawing skills and Drew at first for

play42:07

30 days then continued his challenge

play42:09

till he reached 100 days his progress

play42:13

passion and dedication is so inspiring

play42:15

and sets a great example for those

play42:18

discouraged from learning to draw some

play42:20

companies like procreate are taking a

play42:23

firm standpoint that they are not going

play42:25

to introduce anything to do with

play42:27

generative AI to their products they are

play42:30

a small team passionate about art and

play42:32

creation and they always value their

play42:34

users over making profit their product

play42:38

procreate has been the number one

play42:40

bestseller app on the app store for iPad

play42:42

for over 5 years and now their latest

play42:45

app procreate dreams became a close

play42:48

second on the bestseller chart they are

play42:51

a prime example of a tech company who

play42:53

believes in providing people tools to

play42:55

express Express themselves easily but

play42:58

they realize that AI is not about making

play43:00

the process of creation easier it is

play43:03

about automating or replacing the

play43:06

process itself we're putting the whole

play43:09

creative future of humanity at risk here

play43:12

because another issue with this is not

play43:13

just that uh like you let's say you want

play43:15

to be an illustrator and now you go

play43:17

straight to doing this kind of stuff

play43:18

you're you're skipping the important

play43:20

steps of learning about the art

play43:22

fundamentals it's not just art

play43:23

fundamentals as you know learning

play43:25

perspective or learning construction and

play43:27

color theory it's it's like you go

play43:29

through a journey when you're learning

play43:30

these things like you you're not just

play43:32

going to school and like you don't you

play43:34

don't enter the school as as the same

play43:36

person as you leave the school as

play43:37

because there is just an emotional

play43:39

Journey there what does it mean to even

play43:40

be creative or to express yourself that

play43:43

is what what's at stake when you're

play43:44

dealing with technology like this

play43:47

generative AI is here to stay there is

play43:50

no stopping or slowing down this

play43:52

technology should you use generative AI

play43:55

for your creative work I will let you

play43:57

decide that but whatever you do I

play44:00

encourage you to use this technology

play44:02

carefully I am hopeful that generative

play44:04

AI will evolve and become more ethical

play44:07

in the future but until then we have to

play44:10

be very selective in how we use it thank

play44:13

you for watching don't forget to share

play44:15

your opinion in the comments and I hope

play44:17

to see you in the next

play44:21

one