Indian food is dangerous | Why Singapore BANNED Indian spices | Abhi and Niyu

Abhi and Niyu
8 May 202414:50

Summary

TLDRThe video script raises concerns about the safety of Indian food, highlighting issues like the presence of ethylene oxide in spices, high sugar content in baby food, and misleading advertising. It criticizes the lack of stringent food safety regulations, inadequate lab testing, and the prioritization of price over health. The script calls for changes in food labeling, stricter advertising standards, and increased consumer awareness to ensure the safety and quality of food in India.

Takeaways

  • 🌍 Singapore and Hong Kong have concerns about certain Indian spices due to the presence of ethylene oxide, which is linked to cancer.
  • 🚫 Some Indian spices have been banned in these regions because of the potential health risks they pose.
  • 🍼 Indian baby food contains significantly more sugar than the same products sold in Europe, potentially contributing to health issues like diabetes.
  • 🔎 The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) is responsible for ensuring the safety of food products but has gaps in its regulations and enforcement.
  • 📊 There is a lack of stringent standards for advertising claims in India, leading to misleading advertisements about health benefits of certain products.
  • 🍫 Examples of food safety issues include insects found in chocolate and noodles containing lead, indicating a need for better quality control.
  • 🧪 The number of accredited food testing labs in India is insufficient, and many do not follow international standards, leading to unreliable food safety testing.
  • 📉 India's ranking in the Global Food Security Index is low, reflecting the country's challenges with food safety and quality.
  • 🌾 Indian agriculture is criticized for its use of polluted water and overuse of pesticides, which can contaminate food and water sources.
  • 📉 The lack of food safety measures impacts not only public health but also the country's economy and international reputation as a food exporter.
  • 🛑 There is a call for change in food labeling, stricter advertising rules, increased testing of food products, and public awareness to improve food safety in India.

Q & A

  • What is the main concern raised in the video script about Indian food safety?

    -The main concern is whether Indian food is safe to consume, as it discusses various instances of food contamination, misleading advertising, and the presence of harmful substances in food products, which could potentially cause health issues like cancer and diabetes.

  • Which Indian spices are mentioned as being banned in Singapore and Hong Kong, and why?

    -The script does not specify which Indian spices are banned, but it mentions that they contain ethylene oxide, a substance that can cause cancer, which is the reason for the ban.

  • What issue is highlighted with protein powders sold in India according to the script?

    -The issue with protein powders sold in India is that they contain pesticides, chemicals, and toxins, and some supplements may contain only half the protein claimed on their labels.

  • How does the script compare baby food sold in India to that sold in Europe?

    -The script points out that baby food sold in India contains 170% more sugar than the same brand's baby food sold in Europe, despite the products being the same, which raises concerns about nutritional differences and health implications.

  • What role does the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) play in food safety?

    -The FSSAI is responsible for making science-based standards for food items, regulating food storage, manufacturing, distribution, sale, and import, enforcing standards, collecting data related to food contamination, identifying risks, setting up rapid alert systems, and spreading general awareness about food safety.

  • What is the issue with food testing labs in India as described in the script?

    -The issue is that out of 726 food testing labs in India, only 585 are accredited according to international standards. Additionally, the state-level labs are reportedly in poor condition, leading to slow work and inadequate testing of food samples.

  • What is the problem with the current food labeling system in India as per the script?

    -The problem is that while nutritional information is provided on food packets, many consumers do not read or understand it, and there is a lack of an effective system to compare similar products and make informed decisions.

  • Why does the script suggest that the food safety situation in India is affecting the country's economy?

    -The script suggests that the lack of food safety is causing India to become an unreliable exporter due to policy failures, leading to bans on Indian fruits and vegetables by Europe and potential losses in the spice market, which impacts the country's economy.

  • What is the Nutri-Score system mentioned in the script, and how could it benefit consumers?

    -The Nutri-Score system is a food labeling system used in France that rates products from A (very healthy) to E (very unhealthy). It benefits consumers by providing a quick and easy way to compare products and make healthier choices based on the ratings.

  • What are some of the proposed solutions in the script to improve food safety in India?

    -The proposed solutions include changing food labeling to a more understandable system like Nutri-Score, increasing the number of accredited labs, giving companies incentives to make healthier products and conduct tests, and making information about rule-breakers publicly available for consumer awareness.

  • How does the script describe the impact of food adulteration on health and the legal system in India?

    -The script describes food adulteration as a significant issue, with statistics showing a high percentage of failed tests and registered cases. However, it points out that only a small percentage of cases result in punishment, indicating a need for stricter enforcement of food safety rules.

Outlines

00:00

🍽️ Concerns Over Indian Food Safety

The video script addresses the alarming issue of food safety in India, with a focus on the presence of harmful substances in commonly consumed products. It mentions that Singapore and Hong Kong have banned certain Indian spices due to the presence of ethylene oxide, a carcinogenic compound. The script also highlights issues with protein powders containing harmful toxins, baby food with excessive sugar content compared to European standards, and misleading advertising by companies. The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) is criticized for failing to enforce strict regulations, leading to a lack of trust in the safety of Indian food products. The video challenges viewers to reconsider their dietary choices and calls for a change in the system to ensure public health.

05:01

🧪 The State of Food Testing Laboratories in India

This paragraph delves into the inadequacies of food testing laboratories in India, with only a fraction of the 726 labs meeting international standards. The FSSAI's own labs are reported to be in poor condition, leading to slow and ineffective testing. The script criticizes the lack of attention given to lab equipment, training, and standards for testing various food contaminants. It emphasizes the need for a culture of voluntary testing by companies, which is currently absent due to the absence of incentives and the prioritization of cost over health. The paragraph also discusses the prevalence of food adulteration and its consequences, including criminal cases and the impact on India's reputation as an exporter.

10:03

🌾 The Impact of Agriculture and Chemical Use on Food Safety

The final paragraph of the script discusses the broader implications of poor agricultural practices and chemical use on food safety. It points out that polluted water, misuse of pesticides, and inadequate quality checks contribute to the contamination of food products. The script argues for stricter regulations and a shift in perspective to view agriculture as a business that prioritizes food safety. It also touches on the rising cases of cancer in India, linking them to the consumption of contaminated food, water, and air. The video concludes by emphasizing the need for change in food labeling, strict advertising standards, and increased transparency in food safety practices to protect consumers and the economy.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Sambar

Sambar is a traditional South Indian dish made with lentils and vegetables in a spicy tamarind-based sauce. In the video, it is mentioned in the context of a claim that eating food with Indian spices might cause cancer, which is a point of contention and a part of the broader discussion on food safety in India.

💡Ethylene Oxide

Ethylene oxide is a chemical compound used mainly for the production of antifreeze, and as a sterilizing agent for medical equipment. The script mentions that some Indian spices are said to contain ethylene oxide, which is linked to cancer, leading to a ban on these spices in Singapore and Hong Kong, emphasizing the importance of chemical safety in food products.

💡Pesticides

Pesticides are substances used to prevent, control, or kill pests that are harmful to crops. The video script raises concerns about the presence of pesticides in protein powders sold in India, indicating a broader issue of chemical contamination in food products and the potential health risks associated with it.

💡Food Safety

Food safety refers to the handling, preparation, and storage of food to prevent foodborne illnesses. The video's main theme revolves around the question of whether Indian food is safe, discussing various instances of food contamination and the role of regulatory bodies like the FSSAI in ensuring food safety.

💡FSSAI

FSSAI stands for Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, which is the national food safety regulator responsible for setting standards and enforcing them across the food supply chain. The script criticizes the FSSAI for gaps in food safety rules and the lack of stringent enforcement, which contributes to the ongoing food safety issues in India.

💡Adulteration

Adulteration refers to the process of making a product inferior or impure by substituting inferior substances or by removing some of the more valuable components. The video discusses the prevalence of food adulteration in India, particularly in spices and oils, and the consequences it has on public health and the economy.

💡Nutri-Score

Nutri-Score is a front-of-pack food rating system used in some countries to provide consumers with a quick indication of the nutritional quality of food products, ranging from A (healthiest) to E (least healthy). The video suggests adopting a similar system in India to encourage healthier food choices and to incentivize companies to improve their products' nutritional profiles.

💡Food Labelling

Food labelling involves providing information on a food product's packaging about its ingredients, nutritional content, and other relevant details. The script points out the need for improved food labelling in India to help consumers make informed choices and to hold companies accountable for their products' healthiness.

💡Pesticide Overuse

Pesticide overuse refers to the excessive application of pesticides in agriculture, which can lead to environmental contamination and health risks. The video highlights the issue of pesticide overuse in India, its impact on food safety, and the need for stricter regulations and quality checks in agriculture.

💡Global Food Security Index

The Global Food Security Index is an annual ranking of countries according to their ability to provide a secure and sustainable supply of food to their populations. The script mentions India's rank on this index, indicating the country's performance in terms of food safety, availability, and quality, and the need for improvement.

💡Food Testing Labs

Food testing labs are facilities that perform various tests on food products to ensure their safety, quality, and compliance with standards. The video criticizes the inadequate number and quality of food testing labs in India, suggesting that this is a significant factor contributing to the country's food safety issues.

Highlights

Singapore and Hong Kong have banned some Indian spices due to the presence of ethylene oxide, a carcinogen.

Indian protein powders may contain pesticides, chemicals, and toxins, and some supplements have less protein than claimed.

Baby food in India contains 170% more sugar than the same products in Europe, despite being the same brand and product.

Indian food safety is under scrutiny, with concerns about the safety of food consumed by 1.4 billion people.

The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) is responsible for food safety but has been criticized for gaps in regulations.

Fake and misleading advertisements are prevalent in India, with no stringent checks before they are aired.

There is no legal definition for 'health drinks' in India, leading to misleading marketing practices.

FSSAI lacks the power to enforce strict standards, and the condition of state-level labs is reportedly poor.

Only 585 out of 726 food testing labs in India are accredited according to international standards.

India's focus on low food prices over quality has led to widespread adulteration and health risks.

Food adulteration is a significant issue in India, with a high percentage of samples failing tests and few resulting in punishment.

Indian agriculture is criticized for using polluted water and overusing pesticides, contaminating food and water sources.

Pesticide overuse is linked to poisoning and contributes to the rise in cancer cases in India.

India ranks 69th in the Global Food Security Index, and food safety issues impact the country's economy and export potential.

The Nutri-Score system in France provides a clear, consumer-friendly rating for food healthiness, which India could adopt.

Current nutritional information on food packaging in India is often ignored or misunderstood by consumers.

Stricter advertising rules, increased lab testing, and public databases of rule-breakers are suggested to improve food safety in India.

The video calls for a change in India's food labeling and a greater focus on food safety for the health of the population and the economy.

Transcripts

play00:00

Can eating Sambar cause cancer?

play00:02

Well, Singapore and Hong Kong

play00:04

agree to this.

play00:05

They say that

play00:06

if you eat food made

play00:07

from these Indian spices,

play00:09

you can get cancer.

play00:11

Singapore and Hong Kong have

play00:13

banned some Indian spices

play00:15

Reason?

play00:16

Because these spices contain ethylene oxide

play00:19

which can cause cancer.

play00:21

Similarly, protein powders sold in India

play00:24

contain pesticides, chemicals and toxins.

play00:27

Some supplements contain only half

play00:29

the protein claimed by them

play00:31

And this is not just about Indian companies.

play00:34

Baby food sold India contains 170% more sugar

play00:37

than baby food sold in Europe

play00:39

The brand is the same.

play00:41

The product is the same.

play00:42

But they get nutrition and we get diabetes.

play00:47

These three different incidents raise a big question.

play00:51

Is Indian food safe?

play00:54

In this video,

play00:55

we will talk about an issue that

play00:57

plays with the health of 1.4 billion Indians

play01:01

Because we all eat food

play01:03

and expect it to be safe.

play01:05

If you think India needs a change

play01:08

in the system,

play01:09

then share this video as much as possible

play01:11

So that people are educated

play01:13

and our authorities become serious

play01:16

Let's start the video with a challenge.

play01:18

It's a challenge for you

play01:19

to eat this food.

play01:21

Watch these videos.

play01:22

We always judge street food.

play01:24

We see that there is no hygiene at all

play01:27

No one washes their hands,

play01:28

no one wears gloves

play01:29

And people enjoy having pani puri

play01:31

by standing next to sewage

play01:32

Health conscious people think that

play01:34

if you stop eating street food,

play01:35

then problem is solved

play01:36

Because the food that comes

play01:38

in the packet is safe.

play01:39

Right?

play01:40

Wrong!

play01:41

FSSAI is responsible for food safety in India

play01:44

But still,

play01:45

insects coming out of chocolate,

play01:46

baby food having more sugar

play01:49

and noodles containing lead in them

play01:50

all of this has become quite common

play01:52

Why does this happen?

play01:54

Let's get to the bottom of the matter.

play01:55

We identified five such points.

play01:58

Because of which

play01:59

India's packaged food is becoming dangerous

play02:02

The first point is fake ads.

play02:05

Some time ago,

play02:06

Patanjali ran ads that their products

play02:08

can get rid of asthma and heart diseases.

play02:11

The Supreme Court asked Patanjali

play02:13

on what basis they were making such claims

play02:18

Is there any data?

play02:20

Was there any lab testing conducted?

play02:21

Which experts were consulted?

play02:23

Fake or misleading ads

play02:25

are the ones that start fooling you.

play02:28

You must have seen some such ad, right?

play02:30

Do write the name of that ad in the comments

play02:33

Today, any company can say

play02:35

anything in its ad.

play02:37

And no one checks the ads

play02:38

before running them

play02:40

Advertising Standards Council of India

play02:42

identifies misleading claims.

play02:44

But this is not a legal body.

play02:46

This is a voluntary, self-regulating body.

play02:48

A self-regulatory organization

play02:51

cannot do the work of the government

play02:52

That is why, in India,

play02:54

sugar drinks are sold as health drinks openly

play02:58

When the National Commission of Protection

play03:00

of Child Rights enquired,

play03:02

they found that

play03:03

there was no definition of

play03:05

health drink in India.

play03:07

That is,

play03:08

the marketing department can call

play03:10

anything as a health drink.

play03:11

And why is that?

play03:13

Because there is no police.

play03:15

The thieves have full permission to steal.

play03:18

These same loopholes

play03:20

are exploited for marketing.

play03:22

India's food safety rules have gaps.

play03:24

Let's take the example of baby food.

play03:25

WHO has said that

play03:27

children below the age of 2

play03:29

should stay away from added sugar.

play03:31

Otherwise, in the future,

play03:32

the chances of diabetes,

play03:33

heart disease and cancer increase.

play03:35

Here, they have especially

play03:37

focused on added sugar.

play03:39

When we read all the FSSAI rules

play03:41

about baby foods

play03:43

we came to know that

play03:44

there are no limitations

play03:46

on the amount of added sugar

play03:48

Behind any food item,

play03:50

you will see this logo of FSSAI.

play03:52

FSSAI stands for

play03:53

Food Safety and Standards Authority of India

play03:55

FSSAI's job is to make

play03:57

science-based standards for food items

play04:00

Food storage,

play04:01

manufacturing,

play04:02

distribution,

play04:02

sale,

play04:03

import must be regulated

play04:05

Their standards must be enforced.

play04:08

Collection of Data related to food contamination

play04:11

Risks Identification

play04:13

And setting up rapid alert system

play04:15

Setting up an information system in India

play04:19

Spreading general awareness about food safety

play04:22

Why is there so much sugar in baby food,

play04:24

is the question which the FSSAI should ask

play04:26

But who actually asked this question?

play04:28

An NGO named Public Eye

play04:30

published a report on Nestle's sugar issue.

play04:32

They tested 15 baby food varieties in India.

play04:36

On an average,

play04:38

2.2 to 2.7 gm of sugar was found

play04:41

in each serving

play04:42

In this packet,

play04:43

per 100 gm of Cerelac,

play04:45

there is 11.6 gm of sugar.

play04:47

And their packet states that,

play04:49

3 scoops or 25 gm powder

play04:51

should be given twice a day

play04:53

to 6-10 month old babies

play04:55

4 scoops or 33 gm powder

play04:57

should be given twice a day

play04:59

to 10-12 month old babies

play05:01

6 scoops or 50gm of powder

play05:03

should be given twice a day

play05:05

to 12-24 month old babies

play05:07

Just think

play05:08

how much added sugar

play05:10

you are giving your baby

play05:12

in the name of baby food.

play05:13

If you look at the back of the packet

play05:15

it is clearly written that

play05:16

there is so much sugar in it.

play05:18

On the packet, it is also written that

play05:19

mother's breast milk is

play05:21

the best nutrition for the baby

play05:22

So who is responsible for spreading awareness

play05:24

and for making the right rules?

play05:26

FSSAI.

play05:27

To ensure safety,

play05:29

food has to be tested in labs.

play05:31

Which can make things quite clear

play05:34

Quite literally.

play05:35

Because lab testing shows

play05:37

how true are the company's claims

play05:40

What are the nutrients?

play05:42

How much sugar is there?

play05:43

Are there any harmful substances?

play05:45

There are labs that actually

play05:46

conduct tests for food safety

play05:48

According to this press release,

play05:50

there are 726 food testing labs in India.

play05:53

But out of these labs,

play05:55

only 585 have accredited themselves

play05:57

according to international standards

play05:59

Which means only these many labs

play06:01

follow international standards.

play06:03

Think about it.

play06:03

Do you think it is right for India

play06:05

to have only these labs?

play06:08

FSSAI runs 207 labs

play06:11

They themselves have said that

play06:12

the condition of state-level labs is very bad.

play06:15

Result?

play06:16

Slow work.

play06:17

In 2022-23, Maharashtra's FDA

play06:19

collected only 2000 samples from Mumbai

play06:22

And even those have not been tested properly.

play06:25

Because neither FSSAI

play06:27

nor any state government pays attention

play06:28

Dr. Satyaprakash was the head of Kolkata's

play06:31

Central Food Laboratory.

play06:33

Since 2011,

play06:34

he has written letters to the government

play06:36

that the condition of food testing labs

play06:37

is not good.

play06:38

They need a lot of changes.

play06:41

Neither did these labs have proper equipment

play06:43

nor training to test for all contaminants.

play06:46

In fact,

play06:46

FSSAI did not even have proper rules

play06:48

to test for all problems.

play06:50

That letter says that

play06:51

FSSAI did not have

play06:52

any standards for cheese testing.

play06:54

So even if they take a sample of cheese,

play06:56

what will they test for?

play06:58

Labs do not have power.

play07:00

They don't have good suppliers for equipments

play07:02

In fact,

play07:03

the upgraded equipment taken from

play07:05

the World Bank grant isn't even used

play07:07

They are playing with the lives of Indians

play07:10

Because in our country,

play07:12

there is no culture of testing.

play07:13

No company does voluntarily testing

play07:16

because they don't have any incentive

play07:18

There is no benefit received for

play07:21

spending money to conduct independent tests

play07:24

So where is the focus?

play07:26

On price.

play07:27

The truth is that in India,

play07:28

prices are given priority over health

play07:31

Both the companies and the consumers

play07:33

Companies focus on keeping low prices

play07:36

and not on quality.

play07:37

So there is adulteration.

play07:39

This is a bitter truth.

play07:40

Even today,

play07:41

food adulteration is a big issue in our country

play07:44

These statistics are of Punjab,

play07:46

Haryana and Himachal Pradesh.

play07:47

Out of all the samples

play07:48

tested for food testing,

play07:49

22% of the samples failed the tests

play07:53

519 criminal cases were registered

play07:55

against them

play07:56

And in only 16% of the cases,

play07:58

punishment has been given

play08:00

In 2022,

play08:01

FSSAI registered 30,000 cases

play08:03

against food adulterators

play08:06

FSSAI observed that

play08:07

spices and oils are adulterated the most

play08:11

But the data of these 30,000 cases

play08:13

and the companies involved, can't be found

play08:16

Why?

play08:17

Does FSSAI wants to

play08:19

hide this data intentionally

play08:21

So that we don't boycott the brands

play08:23

This is an issue to ponder upon

play08:25

Let me give you my personal example.

play08:27

In 2015,

play08:28

I went to my friend's wedding

play08:29

and on the very first day,

play08:30

I had a throat infection

play08:32

which continued for the next few months

play08:35

After a lot of trial and error,

play08:36

my doctor and I realized that

play08:38

eating adulterated oil

play08:40

is the reason behind this infection

play08:41

Caterers mix cooking oil

play08:43

and this mixed oil causes a sore throat

play08:45

And till date,

play08:46

if I eat food cooked in mixed oil in any hotel

play08:50

my throat instantly gets inflamed.

play08:52

And this whole journey

play08:54

starts with agriculture.

play08:56

This is going to offend a lot of people

play08:59

But Indian agriculture is broken.

play09:02

India's water is polluted.

play09:04

This polluted water contains

play09:05

a lot of chemicals.

play09:07

Industries do not treat their waste water.

play09:10

We use different chemical products

play09:12

like shampoos and soaps

play09:14

And the house's sewage goes into the drain

play09:17

without any treatment.

play09:19

Many times, this dirty water

play09:21

gets mixed in the rivers

play09:22

and this river water is used in agriculture

play09:24

Similarly,

play09:26

pesticides and insecticides

play09:28

contaminate our food

play09:29

In 134 studies,

play09:31

50,000 people were studied

play09:33

and it was found that

play09:34

pesticides are the leading

play09:35

cause of poisoning.

play09:37

People were intentionally or unintentionally

play09:39

consuming pesticides which caused poisoning

play09:42

These pesticides get mixed into

play09:44

rivers and groundwater

play09:46

which pollutes the water

play09:48

including our drinking water.

play09:52

All these things require laws.

play09:54

And this needs to be strictly ensured that

play09:57

pesticides are not overused.

play09:59

We need to start seeing

play10:01

agriculture as a business.

play10:03

Farmers are our food providers

play10:04

But it is a bitter truth that

play10:06

pesticides overuse causes slow poisoning

play10:10

Till the time the government

play10:11

doesn't takes quality checks seriously,

play10:13

we need to be very careful.

play10:15

Because who all are affected by all these?

play10:18

Cancer cases are rising in the country.

play10:20

Have you ever thought why?

play10:22

Because our food,

play10:23

water and air are all polluted

play10:26

And no one cares about it.

play10:29

Even today,

play10:30

we are asking for votes

play10:31

in the name of caste and religion.

play10:33

Whereas, there are many issues

play10:35

which have an impact on everyone.

play10:37

This is a bitter truth.

play10:38

The lack of food safety has an impact

play10:40

on your health as well as

play10:41

the country's economy

play10:43

India becomes an unreliable exporter

play10:46

due to these policy failures

play10:48

From 2014 to 2017,

play10:50

Europe had banned

play10:51

Indian fruits and vegetables.

play10:53

Alphonso mango was one of them

play10:56

which we call as the King of Fruits.

play10:58

Reason?

play10:59

Because our exporters

play11:00

did not follow proper norms.

play11:02

It had worms in it and Europe didn't like it

play11:05

The point is that

play11:06

they are very serious about

play11:08

their people and their safety standards

play11:11

Europe is quite strict when it comes to food

play11:14

Due to the news of these spices,

play11:15

India's spice market may face

play11:17

a loss of $700 million.

play11:20

Today,

play11:21

India comes on the 69th rank

play11:23

in the Global Food Security Index.

play11:24

If we want to become the world's food bank

play11:27

we need to make our products safe

play11:29

for the entire world.

play11:31

Because following proper standards

play11:34

will take the country's economy forward.

play11:36

It will give us an advantage

play11:38

in exports and trade.

play11:40

Moreover,

play11:41

it will increase our people's life expectancy.

play11:44

So what can we do?

play11:45

We need to change our food labelling.

play11:48

Last year,

play11:49

we went to France on behalf of Startup India

play11:51

where we talked about

play11:52

the creator economy in VivaTech.

play11:54

We saw an interesting labelling system

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in those markets

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Every item in the supermarket was given

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A, B, C, D, E rating

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This is called the Nutri-Score system.

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A means very healthy

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and E means very unhealthy.

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Now, with the help of this Nutri-Score

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if I want to eat chocolate

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and there are two options in front of me

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One chocolate comes in D category

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and one comes in B category

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then I will choose B category chocolate

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Companies also get an incentive

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to make their products healthy.

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Because more people are choosing

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healthy products.

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So the more unhealthy the product

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the lesser the sales

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Today, in India,

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every packet has nutritional information on it

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But honestly tell me,

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how many of us actually read it?

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and how many people understand it?

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How many people can compare

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two similar products

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and take an informed decision?

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That means there are flaws in this system

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and there is a need for change in this system

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We all like street food

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No one stops anyone

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from eating street food

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but they expect

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some basic hygiene to be maintained.

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But how will we know that

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the food that is not made

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in front of us is safe?

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Companies will always focus on profit

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Until the rules are not strict

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Advertising standards are not improved

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and companies that make false claims

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are not punished

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it won't be clear

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whether our food is safe or not

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We say that consumer is king

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but our food which we consider safe

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is slowly poisoning this 'King'

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And this situation will only change

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when we will enforce these changes

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If you understood the point of this video

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then share it with as many people as possible

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so that they at least

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start reading labels.

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We have to make children make this a habit

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to read labels since childhood

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so that India's future can be safe

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Advertising rules will have to be strict

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Labs will have to be increased

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Companies will have to be given incentives

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to make their products healthier

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and to get them tested

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And those who break these rules

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all their information should be

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publicly available in a database

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so that along with courts,

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we consumers can punish them.

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These are all the solutions that

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the government, consumers

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and other companies will have to apply.

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And sharing this important message with you,

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matters to me

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Hey friends, thank you so much for watching

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this video till the end.

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If you liked this video

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then press the like button.

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To watch more such videos,

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don't forget to subscribe to the channel.

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'How India Works'

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In this series,

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we discuss different topics of India

play14:35

which you can see here

play14:36

One topic of that series is about taxation.

play14:39

You can find out why taxes are so high in India

play14:41

by watching this video.

play14:42

Thank you so much for watching

play14:43

because your support

play14:45

matters to us.

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Related Tags
Food SafetyIndian SpicesCancer RiskRegulatory BodiesEthylene OxidePesticide IssuesNutritional MisleadingHealth AwarenessFood AdulterationConsumer Education