Dado Banatao at the APEC SME Summit

Rappler
22 Jan 201309:32

Summary

TLDRMr. D, a Filipino entrepreneur and venture capitalist, shares his journey and insights from Silicon Valley in a motivational speech. He emphasizes the importance of formal education and continuous learning as the foundation for success in the competitive tech industry. Mr. D recounts his experiences, from his initial challenges at Stanford to his innovative work in microprocessors at National Semiconductor. He highlights the significance of taking on tough projects to build confidence and push personal boundaries. As an entrepreneur, he discusses the development of the first PC chipset and the introduction of graphics acceleration, which revolutionized the industry. Mr. D stresses that success is not about a single 'Eureka' moment, but rather a series of training and self-challenges that lead to overcoming seemingly impossible tasks. His story serves as an inspiration for aspiring entrepreneurs and underscores the value of perseverance and lifelong learning.

Takeaways

  • 🎓 **Formal Education**: The importance of proper training and education as a foundation for an entrepreneur's journey, with a strong emphasis on math and science.
  • 🧠 **Passion for Learning**: Having a passion for technical subjects like math and science from a young age can be a significant advantage in the tech industry.
  • 📚 **Education as an Equalizer**: The belief that education is a great equalizer and a first challenge in life that can set the stage for future success.
  • 🧐 **Performance as Evidence**: The idea that academic performance, such as GPA, can be an indicator of a person's ability to learn and their knowledge base.
  • 🤓 **Challenges in School**: The notion that challenging educational experiences, like attending a competitive school like Stanford, can bring out one's true capabilities.
  • 🚀 **Building on Knowledge**: The accumulation of knowledge and skills from schooling that can be applied in the professional world, especially in high-stakes environments like Silicon Valley.
  • 🛠️ **Continuous Training**: The necessity of continuous learning and training to stay competitive and innovative in the field of technology.
  • 💼 **Entrepreneurial Spirit**: The transition from being an individual contributor to an entrepreneur, emphasizing the importance of taking on bigger challenges and gaining confidence.
  • 🔄 **Challenging Oneself**: The belief that continuous self-challenge is key to personal growth and professional success, even after achieving a certain level of expertise.
  • 💼 **Venture Capital Insights**: The shift from entrepreneurship to venture capitalism as a way to engage with multiple companies and continue learning about investing in technology.
  • 🌟 **Success through Training**: The message that success in a competitive field like technology is not just about eureka moments, but a series of training and building confidence in one's abilities.

Q & A

  • What does Mr. D emphasize as the first step for an entrepreneur to succeed in Silicon Valley?

    -Mr. D emphasizes proper training or education, including formal education in fields like engineering and a passion for math and science, as the first step for an entrepreneur to succeed.

  • Why does Mr. D consider education as the greatest equalizer?

    -Mr. D views education as the greatest equalizer because it provides everyone with the same opportunities to learn and be tested fairly, without bias, laying a foundation for future challenges in life and entrepreneurship.

  • How does Mr. D connect his academic performance to his entrepreneurial success?

    -Mr. D connects his academic performance to his entrepreneurial success by highlighting that his GPA and the challenges he faced in school were indicators of his ability to learn and apply knowledge, which later helped him in his career.

  • What was Mr. D's approach when he first joined National Semiconductor?

    -When Mr. D first joined National Semiconductor, he sought out the toughest design project in the company to challenge himself and utilize his knowledge in computer architecture and chip design.

  • How did Mr. D's experience at Stanford influence his career?

    -Mr. D's experience at Stanford, where he was challenged among the best students globally, helped him realize his potential as a natural engineer and instilled in him the confidence to tackle complex projects in his career.

  • What role did continuous training and challenging oneself play in Mr. D's career?

    -Continuous training and challenging oneself played a crucial role in Mr. D's career, as it allowed him to build upon his knowledge, gain confidence, and take on increasingly difficult projects, which ultimately led to innovation and success.

  • Why did Mr. D decide to become a venture capitalist after being a successful entrepreneur?

    -Mr. D decided to become a venture capitalist to engage with multiple companies and continue learning about investing in technology companies, after feeling that he had proven all he could as an entrepreneur.

  • What was the significance of the local bus concept introduced by Mr. D?

    -The local bus concept introduced by Mr. D was significant because it sped up graphics acceleration in PCs, leading to an architecture that is still present in the industry today.

  • How does Mr. D view the process of becoming successful in the technology sector?

    -Mr. D views the process of becoming successful in the technology sector as a series of training and developing confidence in one's abilities, rather than a single 'eureka' moment.

  • What was Mr. D's first major project at his first company?

    -Mr. D's first major project at his first company involved writing all the software and algorithms for a new microprocessor design, which significantly reduced the project's completion time.

  • How did Mr. D's background in computer architecture and solid-state physics contribute to his entrepreneurial ventures?

    -Mr. D's background in computer architecture and solid-state physics contributed to his entrepreneurial ventures by providing him with the knowledge to innovate in chip design and lead projects in the semiconductor industry.

  • What does Mr. D believe is the key to competing in a challenging environment like Silicon Valley?

    -Mr. D believes that the key to competing in a challenging environment like Silicon Valley is a combination of proper education, continuous training, self-challenge, and leveraging one's instincts and knowledge gained through formal education.

Outlines

00:00

🎓 The Importance of Education for Entrepreneurship

The speaker, Mr. D, emphasizes the significance of proper training and education for an entrepreneur. He shares his personal journey, highlighting his passion for Math and Science from a young age, and how this led him to pursue engineering. Mr. D underscores the value of formal education as an equalizer and a foundational challenge that tests an individual's capabilities. He also discusses his experiences at Stanford, one of the most competitive academic environments, and how the rigorous academic training equipped him with the skills and instincts necessary for his entrepreneurial endeavors. His first phase as an entrepreneur was heavily influenced by the knowledge and practices he acquired through his educational journey.

05:00

🚀 Continuous Learning and Challenging Oneself

The speaker continues by illustrating the importance of continuous learning and challenging oneself throughout one's career. He recounts his experience at National Semiconductor, where he sought the most difficult design projects to push his limits and apply his knowledge in computer architecture and chip design. Mr. D's proactive approach led to innovative solutions, such as automating design processes with software to expedite project completion. He also speaks about his transition to entrepreneurship, where he faced new challenges and opportunities, particularly in the field of PC chipsets and graphics acceleration. His ventures resulted in significant successes, such as the introduction of the local bus concept, which is still relevant today. The speaker concludes by stressing that success is not about sudden epiphanies but rather a series of training and building confidence in one's abilities to tackle difficult tasks, even in competitive sectors like technology.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Entrepreneur

An entrepreneur is an individual who creates a new business, bearing most of the risks and enjoying most of the rewards. In the context of the video, the speaker discusses his journey as an entrepreneur in Silicon Valley, emphasizing the importance of continuous learning and challenging oneself to achieve success.

💡Formal Education

Formal education refers to the structured learning process that takes place in educational institutions such as schools and universities. The speaker highlights the significance of formal education in shaping his career, particularly in developing a strong foundation in math, science, and engineering, which later helped him in his entrepreneurial endeavors.

💡Innovation

Innovation is the process of introducing new ideas, methods, or products. It is a key theme in the video, as the speaker talks about the necessity of innovation to compete in the technology sector. He shares his experience of designing the first PC chipset and introducing the local bus concept, which are examples of innovation in his career.

💡Challenges

Challenges are difficult tasks or situations that require considerable effort to overcome. The video emphasizes that challenges are opportunities for growth and learning. The speaker recounts how he sought out the toughest design projects at his first company and how adversity in his career led to new opportunities.

💡Confidence

Confidence is a feeling of self-assurance arising from an appreciation of one's own abilities or qualities. In the video, the speaker discusses how gaining confidence through education and overcoming challenges is crucial for an entrepreneur. It is illustrated by his belief in his abilities as an engineer after completing a difficult project at National Semiconductor.

💡Risk Taking

Risk taking involves the willingness to take on calculated risks, especially in business or investment. The speaker mentions that after establishing a solid educational foundation, there is a level of risk taking involved in the next phase of his career. This is evident when he decided to tackle the most challenging design project at his company, which was a risk that paid off.

💡Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley is a region in California known for its high-tech innovation and entrepreneurship. It serves as the backdrop for the speaker's story, where he discusses his experiences competing and succeeding in one of the most competitive technology innovation hubs in the world.

💡Venture Capitalist

A venture capitalist is an individual or firm that provides capital for startup firms with high growth potential in exchange for equity or ownership stake. The speaker transitions from being an entrepreneur to a venture capitalist, allowing him to engage with multiple companies and continue learning about investing in technology firms.

💡Microprocessors

Microprocessors are miniature processors that integrate the functions of a computer's central processing unit (CPU) on a single chip. The speaker's interest in microprocessors is significant in the video, as it led him to pursue the design of a computer chip that combined computer architecture and design, which was a new sector at the time.

💡Graphic Acceleration

Graphic acceleration refers to the use of dedicated hardware to improve the performance of graphics in computers. The speaker's venture into graphic acceleration led to the introduction of a local bus concept that significantly sped up computer graphics, which is still utilized in modern architectures.

💡Continuous Training

Continuous training is the ongoing process of learning and updating one's skills and knowledge. The speaker stresses the importance of continuous training throughout his career, which allowed him to stay competitive and innovative in the technology sector.

Highlights

The speaker emphasizes the importance of proper training and education for an entrepreneur, starting from a young age with a passion for math and science.

Formal education, including university, is viewed as the greatest equalizer and provides foundational knowledge for an entrepreneur's career.

The speaker shares his belief that school is the first challenge in life, and performance in school is an indicator of one's capabilities and knowledge.

The speaker's first quarter at Stanford was extremely challenging, but it revealed his natural talent as an engineer.

Continuous training and challenging oneself is crucial for growth, both in school and throughout one's career.

The speaker's first company, National Semiconductor, allowed him to apply what he learned in school to real-world projects and gain confidence.

Taking on the toughest design project at National Semiconductor and successfully completing it showcased the speaker's ability to innovate and perform.

The speaker's next phase as an entrepreneur involved creating the first PC chipset in Silicon Valley, which led to the formation of Chips and Technologies.

Chips and Technologies achieved significant revenue growth, reaching a $650 million run rate before the speaker left to start a new venture.

The speaker emphasizes the importance of continuously challenging oneself and learning from each new experience as an entrepreneur.

The speaker's venture into graphics acceleration introduced the local bus concept, which is still used in modern architectures today.

After proving himself as an entrepreneur, the speaker transitioned to venture capitalism to work with multiple companies and continue learning.

The speaker's venture capital investments, including being the first investor in Marvell, have been very successful.

The speaker emphasizes that success is not about a single eureka moment, but rather a series of training and developing confidence in one's abilities.

The speaker's journey from engineer to entrepreneur to venture capitalist demonstrates the value of continuous learning and challenging oneself.

The speaker's experiences in Silicon Valley show that even in a highly competitive industry, success is achievable through proper training, continuous learning, and self-challenge.

Transcripts

play00:02

ladies and Gentlemen please welcome Mr D

play00:06

[Music]

play00:16

banat hello I don't have slides so you

play00:20

just have to look at

play00:22

me but I I am with you I am Filipino but

play00:26

it's nice to be here more times now than

play00:30

uh the last 15 years or 40 years that

play00:33

I've been in in

play00:36

California instead of talking about my

play00:38

experiences because a lot of you guys

play00:40

have uh heard some of that already I I

play00:42

would like to talk

play00:44

about the basic things that maybe in

play00:48

general gets one to do the things that

play00:50

I've done in Silicon Valley especially

play00:53

arguably one of the most

play00:56

competitive uh Technology Innovation in

play01:00

the world but with some basic things I

play01:03

think one can

play01:05

compete there are roughly in my uh point

play01:08

of view there are four

play01:10

faces um for an entrepreneur to do to be

play01:14

able to do some of the things that I've

play01:16

done first is proper training or

play01:18

education meaning formal education so we

play01:22

go to the normal

play01:24

um universities I guess in uh involved

play01:27

in engineering uh but even before that

play01:30

uh as a young kid I I observed that I

play01:33

had the passion for Math and

play01:35

Science um and a few other technical

play01:38

things and as you go into High School

play01:41

you see it more because you get more

play01:43

challenges and so on and I believe that

play01:46

education in fact is the greatest

play01:47

equalizer for everyone in some cases in

play01:51

fact when I interview CEOs for one of my

play01:55

companies that need one there was it's

play01:58

not often that I asked this question

play01:59

question but I felt compelled to ask

play02:02

about two um on two occasions what was

play02:06

your

play02:08

GPA and simply because of my belief that

play02:11

school is is the first challenge in

play02:13

anyone's life everyone is treated well

play02:17

you go to school and learn the lesson

play02:18

and then you're given a test and

play02:21

assuming that one does not cheat it's

play02:24

it's an Evidence of what one can do what

play02:26

one can learn and your knowledge

play02:29

basically how you really are so I

play02:31

believe that as one leads through life

play02:33

and being an entrepreneur and so on you

play02:35

really uh rely on those instincts on

play02:38

that knowledge that you've learned

play02:40

through school and then you go into the

play02:42

university system you are even more

play02:45

challenged and then graduate school even

play02:48

worse I have to tell you that my first

play02:50

quarter at Stanford I actually thought

play02:53

what did I do to myself in a school that

play02:56

accepts only 1% of all applicants you're

play02:59

competing with the best Engineers or

play03:02

students coming from all over the world

play03:05

uh and in the

play03:07

US but thank God there was this thing

play03:09

called Thanksgiving

play03:11

weekend 4 days I was able to recover for

play03:14

finals but I mention this only simply

play03:18

because uh school one more time assuming

play03:22

that it is challenging enough where you

play03:24

are you are truly tested the natural

play03:28

part of you comes out and I found that

play03:31

at that point in time after I have gone

play03:33

through that first quarter and and was

play03:36

able to compete uh I am a natural

play03:39

engineer and I still say that today I

play03:42

would have to say that that formal

play03:44

training enabled me to get to my next

play03:47

phase um and so the first phase of my

play03:51

career as an entrepreneur and now a

play03:53

venture capitalist is defined

play03:57

by implementing or practicing the things

play04:00

that I've learned in school even from

play04:03

first grade because it's a complete

play04:06

buildup of what you know how to do at

play04:09

any point in time so you rely on your

play04:12

instincts of course there some level of

play04:15

risk taking in the next phase next phase

play04:17

I

play04:18

mean but you you have that uh further

play04:23

training you know you practice what you

play04:25

learned in school you can do designs you

play04:30

lead projects you try to

play04:33

innovate as chair said it's it's a lot

play04:35

of innovation if you want to

play04:37

compete but as an individual contributor

play04:40

you have to

play04:41

perform then you gain confidence that

play04:43

you can actually outdo the next engineer

play04:46

sitting beside you or across the room

play04:49

and then you you do bigger projects in

play04:52

my first company at National

play04:53

semiconductor I there was a time after

play04:55

about a year in um as an individual

play04:58

contributor I I went to the director and

play05:00

said I want the toughest design in the

play05:02

company of course he looked at me and

play05:05

are you crazy or

play05:07

something knowing that there are a lot

play05:08

of senior Engineers there but truly I

play05:10

meant that because uh at that time we

play05:14

were into this um sector of

play05:18

semiconductor that we now call

play05:20

microprocessors it was a very

play05:23

new um combination of understanding

play05:27

computer architecture and know how to

play05:28

design a chip

play05:30

and what I what I studied at Stanford

play05:32

was a combination of B solid state and

play05:34

computer architecture and so on so all I

play05:36

wanted to do was put that whole computer

play05:38

on a chip and since it was new in the

play05:40

company and I I did a lot of software in

play05:43

my first project with them uh I did work

play05:46

with the more traditional chip designers

play05:49

and when I looked at what they were

play05:50

doing it's all done by hand and I said

play05:52

all right let's put some software in

play05:54

here otherwise it'll take us 5 years to

play05:56

finish this project my first year in the

play05:59

project project I wrote all the software

play06:01

did all the algorithms and so on and it

play06:03

worked but so that's when I went to the

play06:06

director

play06:07

so there is built up knowledge in

play06:10

training continuous training

play06:12

continuously challenging yourself

play06:14

similar to when you go to a an excellent

play06:17

very challenging school like Stanford

play06:19

you you really are challenged even in

play06:22

your career you have to challenge

play06:23

yourself and then the next phase which

play06:26

is even harder my next phase in my

play06:28

career is being an entrepreneur

play06:30

uh Cher and I share a lot of experiences

play06:32

here where you know we did the first uh

play06:35

PC chipset in Silicon Valley and I did

play06:38

work with ity they wanted to work with

play06:40

me so that I can license to them the

play06:42

very first chipset for the

play06:44

PC and I said fine so they were supposed

play06:47

to give me some money but some engineer

play06:49

at it said oh no we can do this so

play06:52

anyway we scraped the bottom of the

play06:54

barrels they say and we finally did our

play06:56

chipset and the rest is history when I

play06:58

left chips and Technologies to sts3

play07:01

which is the first graphic acceleration

play07:03

in the PC industry chips was already at

play07:05

about 650 million run rate in

play07:08

revenues but see this is the kind of

play07:10

thing that is a good point here

play07:12

meaning I never felt as an entrepreneur

play07:15

that I should stay at one company even

play07:19

if it is if I was a a Founder there

play07:22

because there are so many challenges

play07:24

again there was a point that chair

play07:25

mentioned about challenges adversity

play07:28

creates opport unities so because I was

play07:32

very familiar with the architecture of

play07:33

the PC the graphics at that point in

play07:36

time was so poor that I

play07:39

quit uh my company and started this this

play07:43

Graphics acceleration in introduced this

play07:45

local bus concept for speeding up

play07:47

everything and we enjoy that today that

play07:49

architecture is still there today I'm

play07:51

sure it's moved on to other platforms

play07:54

but I'm mentioning this only because you

play07:57

continuously challenge yourself but in

play07:59

challenging yourself you learn more and

play08:02

so there was a point in time that I felt

play08:05

as an entrepreneur there is nothing more

play08:07

I can prove that I cannot do as an

play08:09

entrepreneur that's really bragging

play08:11

frankly but it's really what I thought I

play08:14

became a venture capitalist because then

play08:16

I can deal with multiple companies and

play08:19

I'm glad to say that you know the first

play08:21

few funds and it was very successful for

play08:24

those in I'm sure Sharon know some of

play08:27

these companies marll I was the first

play08:30

investor there work with the team Surf

play08:32

and a whole bunch of others um but

play08:35

that's more training I am still learning

play08:39

how to invest in technology

play08:41

companies so for those of you guys who

play08:44

think that you know being successful is

play08:48

about discovering or thinking something

play08:51

in the shower or whatever no it is a

play08:55

series of

play08:56

training uh developing confidence that

play08:59

that you can do it will lead you

play09:02

eventually to doing a lot of those

play09:04

things that seemingly are so difficult

play09:06

and impossible to do it can be done even

play09:09

in a a sector of the industry that is so

play09:12

tough which is

play09:13

technology so those are the things that

play09:16

I had taken away from all of these um

play09:20

modest successes uh in my career in

play09:22

Silicon Valley thank

play09:28

you

play09:29

[Music]

Rate This

5.0 / 5 (0 votes)

Related Tags
EntrepreneurshipSilicon ValleyEducationInnovationTechnologyChallengesSuccess StoriesEngineeringVenture CapitalLeadershipSelf-Challenge