Beyond the Books - Brian Pilarski

Walsh College
10 Apr 202438:35

Summary

TLDRIn this engaging conversation, Walsh College alumnus and board of trustee, Brian Polanski, shares his educational journey and professional experiences. Brian discusses the impact of his Master's degree on his career advancement, emphasizing the value of higher education in today's competitive job market. He also provides insights into his work in the insurance industry, highlighting the importance of client-first approaches, continuous learning, and maintaining a strong sense of duty and responsibility. Brian's story serves as a testament to the transformative power of education and its role in shaping leaders who make a positive impact in their fields.

Takeaways

  • 🎓 The value of a master's degree is not just in the knowledge acquired, but in the way it transforms your thinking and problem-solving abilities.
  • 🚀 A graduate degree can accelerate one's career progression, making up for years of experience and demonstrating a commitment to learning and advancement.
  • 🌟 Walsh College's reputation as an excellent business school played a significant role in Brian's decision to pursue his master's degree there.
  • 📈 The long-term return on investment of education is evident in the way it continues to benefit individuals throughout their careers, even decades after graduation.
  • 💡 The transformational knowledge gained from higher education is different from transactional knowledge and enables individuals to see the world through a different lens.
  • 🗣️ Strong communication skills, honed through higher education, are crucial in the insurance industry for effectively understanding and addressing client needs.
  • 🔍 A client-first approach in business involves understanding the client's needs, risks, and potential problems, and offering pragmatic solutions.
  • 🌐 Networking and putting oneself in situations where connections can be made is essential for career growth and can lead to unexpected opportunities.
  • 📚 Continuous learning and investment in oneself are key to staying relevant and competitive in the ever-evolving professional landscape.
  • 🛠️ The practical application of knowledge is vital in the insurance industry, where understanding the technical aspects and staying updated on changes is crucial for advising clients effectively.
  • 🏆 Walsh College alumni, like Brian, exemplify the college's mission of producing graduates who make a positive impact in their fields and communities.

Q & A

  • What was Brian's motivation for pursuing a master's degree at Walsh College?

    -Brian was looking for a way to advance faster in his professional career and noticed that many positions he was interested in required a master's degree. He chose Walsh College due to its excellent reputation as a business school and the fact that many people he knew were alumni.

  • How did Walsh College's educational approach benefit Brian in his professional life?

    -The education at Walsh College allowed Brian to think differently and approach problems with a more sophisticated and strategic mindset. It also provided him with the skills to communicate effectively and lead, which are essential in his role as a senior vice president at Cap Neck.

  • What is Brian's perspective on the value of a master's degree in today's job market?

    -Brian believes that a master's degree can significantly accelerate one's career, showing potential employers that the individual is serious about their education and professional development. It can also demonstrate the ability to learn quickly and adapt to new situations.

  • How does Brian apply his education from Walsh College to his current role in the insurance industry?

    -Brian uses the skills he learned at Walsh College, such as communication, problem-solving, and financial understanding, to navigate the complexities of the insurance industry. He works with clients to understand their needs and risks, and with insurance companies to negotiate terms that are beneficial for his clients.

  • What advice does Brian have for students considering a graduate program?

    -Brian advises students to take risks and invest in themselves early on. He emphasizes the importance of education and the long-term benefits it can bring to one's career and personal development.

  • How does Brian approach client relationships in his work?

    -Brian follows a 'Client First' approach, focusing on understanding the clients' needs, risks, and potential problems. He aims to provide pragmatic solutions and values transparency in his communication with clients.

  • What is Brian's view on the role of networking in professional development?

    -Brian believes that networking is crucial and that putting oneself in social or professional settings where there is potential for connection always pays off. He suggests that being in the right rooms with the right people can lead to significant opportunities.

  • How does Brian's sense of duty and responsibility influence his professional approach?

    -Brian's sense of duty and responsibility drive him to ensure the best outcomes for his clients. He is committed to understanding their needs thoroughly and providing the necessary advice and support, even if it means extra effort on his part.

  • What was Brian's experience with Walsh College's study abroad program?

    -Brian had a positive experience with Walsh College's study abroad program, where he accompanied students to London. He helped the students connect with companies and facilitated debriefing sessions, enhancing their learning experience.

  • How does Brian stay updated with the latest trends in the insurance industry?

    -Brian stays updated with the latest trends by engaging with industry publications and contributing articles, such as his work on cyber insurance for the State Bar of Michigan's publication. He also continuously seeks to deepen his technical knowledge and understanding of the field.

  • What impact did Walsh College have on Brian's personal and professional growth?

    -Walsh College played a significant role in Brian's personal and professional growth by providing him with a solid educational foundation, a network of alumni and professionals, and opportunities for international experiences. It also instilled in him a sense of duty and responsibility that he carries in his work today.

Outlines

00:00

🎓 Welcoming Brian Polanski to Walsh College

The paragraph introduces Brian Polanski, an alumnus and board member of Walsh College, as a guest in the Creator Lab Studio. The conversation begins with pleasantries and a tour of the studio, which used to be a bookstore. Brian shares his journey to Walsh College, his decision to pursue a master's degree, and the wisdom he gained from the experience. The discussion emphasizes the value of higher education in accelerating one's career and the advantages of having a master's degree in the professional world.

05:00

🚀 Accelerating Career Growth through Education

This segment delves into the professional benefits of obtaining a master's degree, as Brian reflects on how furthering his education at Walsh College helped him advance in his career. The conversation highlights the importance of critical thinking, problem-solving, and the ability to view the world through a different lens, which are highly valued by employers. Brian also discusses the long-term return on investment of education and how it continues to benefit him years after completing his degree.

10:03

🛠️ Applying Management Skills in the Insurance Industry

Brian shares his professional experiences in the insurance industry, emphasizing the application of management and leadership skills learned at Walsh College. As a senior vice president, he navigates between clients and insurance companies, utilizing his communication and financing skills. The discussion also touches on the importance of understanding and managing risks, as well as the role of insurance as a necessary business expense.

15:05

🤝 Client-First Approach and Transparency in Business

In this part, Brian elaborates on his client-first approach and the importance of transparency in his role. He discusses the use of personality assessments to improve communication and understanding with clients and colleagues. Brian's commitment to helping clients and his dedication to ethical business practices are highlighted, showcasing his sense of duty and responsibility in his professional role.

20:06

📚 The Value of Graduate Education and Networking

Brian reflects on the differences between undergraduate and graduate education, noting how graduate school offered him a deeper and more focused learning experience. The conversation also explores the benefits of networking and putting oneself in situations that may seem intimidating or uncomfortable. Brian encourages taking risks and investing in oneself, as these actions often lead to significant personal and professional growth.

25:07

🌟 Embracing Lifelong Learning and Mentorship

The final segment discusses the importance of lifelong learning and being surrounded by the right people. Brian talks about the influence of mentors and the value of putting oneself in environments that foster growth. He shares his personal philosophies, such as 'networking never not works,' and encourages others to seek out experiences and connections that will positively impact their lives and careers.

Mindmap

Keywords

💡Walsh College

Walsh College is the educational institution where the interview takes place and is central to the discussion. It represents the community and academic environment that has shaped the interviewee's professional journey. The college is noted for its business program and is a place where students and alumni connect and grow both personally and professionally.

💡Master's Degree

A Master's Degree is an advanced academic degree that typically requires one to two years of study beyond a bachelor's degree. In the context of the video, it signifies a level of educational attainment that can lead to career advancement and increased earning potential. It is also associated with a deeper level of expertise and specialization in a particular field.

💡Professional Development

Professional development refers to the process of acquiring new skills, knowledge, and experiences that contribute to one's career growth. It encompasses various activities such as formal education, on-the-job training, networking, and mentoring. In the video, professional development is portrayed as essential for career advancement and personal fulfillment.

💡Insurance Industry

The insurance industry involves the business of providing financial protection against various types of risk. It includes the creation, sale, and management of insurance policies to individuals and businesses. In the video, the insurance industry is discussed as Brian's area of expertise, where he applies the skills and knowledge acquired from his Master's program.

💡Client-First Approach

A client-first approach is a business strategy that prioritizes the needs and interests of the client above all else. It emphasizes understanding and addressing the client's concerns and goals to provide tailored solutions and exceptional service. In the context of the video, this approach is highlighted as a key principle guiding Brian's interactions with his clients in the insurance industry.

💡Networking

Networking refers to the act of building and maintaining professional relationships. It involves meeting and connecting with individuals who can offer support, advice, or opportunities. In the video, networking is presented as a crucial activity for career growth and business development, with the idea that 'networking never not works,' implying that every networking effort yields some form of positive outcome.

💡Leadership

Leadership refers to the ability to guide and influence a group of people towards achieving a common goal. It involves a set of skills that enable an individual to make decisions, motivate others, and manage resources effectively. In the video, leadership is discussed as a critical skill that Brian has honed through his education and professional experience, which is vital in his role in the insurance industry and his service on the board of trustees at Walsh College.

💡Return on Investment (ROI)

Return on Investment (ROI) is a metric used to evaluate the efficiency of an investment. It measures the ratio of the gain or loss from an investment relative to its cost. In the context of the video, ROI is applied to discuss the value of education, suggesting that investing in a Master's Degree can lead to long-term benefits in terms of career advancement and increased earnings.

💡Personality Assessment

A personality assessment is a tool or method used to evaluate an individual's character traits, behavioral patterns, and psychological attributes. It can help in understanding oneself and others better, leading to improved communication and collaboration. In the video, Brian mentions undergoing a personality assessment, which has provided him with insights into his communication style, leadership approach, and decision-making tendencies.

💡Educational Value

The educational value refers to the worth or benefit derived from an educational experience, including the knowledge, skills, and personal growth that result from it. It is often used to assess the impact of education on an individual's professional and personal development. In the video, the educational value is a central theme, with the discussion highlighting how the education provided by Walsh College has positively influenced Brian's career and approach to his work in the insurance industry.

Highlights

Walsh College's beautiful Creator Lab Studio is a space for innovation and creativity.

Alumni and board of trustee, Mr. Brian Polarski, shares his journey of choosing Walsh College for his master's degree.

Polarski emphasizes the importance of furthering education to accelerate one's career and stand out in the competitive job market.

Walsh College's commercial features Brian, showcasing the college's pride in its alumni and their achievements.

The value of a master's degree lies in the transformative knowledge and perspective it provides, beyond just job requirements.

Polarski's experience at Walsh College helped him develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and effective communication skills.

Walsh College's graduate programs rank highly in terms of alumni salaries, reflecting the return on investment in education.

Polarski's transition from an undergraduate to a graduate student was marked by a deeper understanding and application of knowledge.

The insurance industry, where Polarski works, is a field of business problem-solving and risk management.

Polarski's role as a senior vice president at Cap Nekot involves navigating between client needs and insurance company offerings.

Polarski's commitment to a client-first approach in insurance involves understanding client risks and providing tailored solutions.

Polarski's dedication to continuous learning and staying updated in his field is a key aspect of his professional success.

The importance of surrounding oneself with the right people and environments for personal and professional growth.

Polarski's involvement with Walsh College as a mentor and board member reflects his commitment to giving back to the community.

The impact of networking and putting oneself in situations of potential growth and discomfort.

Polarski's advice for those considering graduate studies: take the leap and invest in oneself, as the benefits compound over time.

The significance of mentors and the right connections in shaping one's career path and professional development.

Transcripts

play00:00

welcome to Walsh College our beautiful

play00:02

Creator Lab Studio I am so excited to be

play00:05

joined today by one of our amazing Walsh

play00:07

College alumni and board of trustee Mr

play00:09

Brian polarski Brian welcome thank you

play00:12

Susie pleasure to be here the studio

play00:14

looks great oh my goodness we are so

play00:16

proud of this studio and you got to see

play00:18

it before when it was the bookstore and

play00:19

now it's our creater lab and we're

play00:21

making just such amazing content in fact

play00:23

Brian it's really cool to have you here

play00:24

because you're in our commercial

play00:25

actually I know we're so proud of our

play00:27

Walsh College commercial and uh you got

play00:30

to star in that so that's great but I

play00:31

really wanted to talk with you today

play00:33

about your journey how you came to Walsh

play00:35

College how you chose Walsh for your

play00:37

master's degree and then what you

play00:39

learned and what words of wisdom that

play00:40

you would have for our students and even

play00:42

our

play00:43

alumni well Susie again thanks for for

play00:45

having me here I do remember being in

play00:47

here when it was the bookstore and I

play00:49

bought physical books you did yeah I had

play00:51

to buy them and then um did you read

play00:53

them and I had to I did I did I did very

play00:56

much um and and I think I did pass the

play00:59

class and did receive a degrees from

play01:01

here so we do have that on record yeah

play01:03

we did so pleasure to be here you how I

play01:06

found Walsh was I was a year or two into

play01:09

my professional career from my undergrad

play01:11

and I wanted to find that next step I

play01:14

was eager to advance in the in the world

play01:16

like most of our students in alums are

play01:18

and potential students and I was trying

play01:21

to find that that leg up and I was

play01:23

looking at opportunities how can I do

play01:24

this

play01:25

faster and I saw experience or a

play01:28

master's degree required

play01:30

a lot of the positions I was looking at

play01:32

the time was management and it was 10

play01:35

years experience plus or 15 years plus

play01:38

Andor equivalent uh master's degree

play01:42

so I looked around I knew I was I had

play01:45

getting into the business field I was in

play01:48

a sales position and I liked it I was

play01:51

intrigued by it I also had no idea how

play01:54

it all worked you know how this world

play01:56

worked and and I thought you know I a

play01:59

master's degree

play02:00

furthering my education could really

play02:01

help me in a lot of respects and

play02:03

possibly give me that chance to maybe

play02:05

Advance a little faster than 10 years

play02:07

from now which felt like an eternity so

play02:10

I looked around at at potential options

play02:12

for doing that and Walsh had such a

play02:15

great reputation for being an excellent

play02:17

business school and a lot of the people

play02:19

at the time that I was around were wal

play02:22

Shalom and it just was a natural fit I

play02:25

from the area it's a great Michigan Bay

play02:27

school and it just felt like the the

play02:30

right homeschooled choice to make and uh

play02:33

I'm glad I did it wow okay so I love

play02:35

what you said too about how in a way the

play02:38

education allowed you to accelerate your

play02:41

career because that is so true I talked

play02:42

to so many students and employers that

play02:44

say we're looking for 10 years of

play02:46

experience but if they have the master's

play02:47

degree that shows us that they're

play02:50

serious that they've put more time in

play02:52

that they're willing to learn they can

play02:53

learn faster and they've invested in

play02:55

their education so I think that's an

play02:57

important point to highlight is if we

play02:59

have listeners out out there that are

play03:00

thinking that sounds like me you know I

play03:02

just graduated and I want to get these

play03:03

management level jobs I'm ready to lead

play03:05

I want to make an impact but I don't

play03:07

have that 10 years don't be deterred

play03:09

from that jump in a graduate program

play03:11

jump in a degree because that also

play03:13

telegraphs to employers a level of

play03:16

sophistication of professionalism and of

play03:18

seriousness and you found that as well

play03:20

well said I mean of course well said you

play03:23

know and one thing I think when people

play03:25

assess whether to get a master's degree

play03:27

in particular or and even in today's

play03:29

current climate is a a general

play03:32

undergraduate degree you know quote

play03:34

unquote worth it or the the expense

play03:36

there's a there's a lot of rhetoric on

play03:38

that currently but to the to the master

play03:41

specifically it really kind of changes

play03:43

the way you think so I heard this when

play03:45

we were at our study abroad program last

play03:48

last summer in London uh with Walsh

play03:51

class with Dr uh John Moore and they

play03:54

brought in a uh International Bank

play03:57

professional that was based in London

play03:59

and when he was talking about education

play04:01

he said we we look for people with

play04:03

master's degrees because when you enter

play04:06

it you think one way when you leave you

play04:08

think a different way so a lot of times

play04:10

people wonder you know what what am I

play04:12

going to do with this specific class you

play04:14

know I struggle in in statistics class

play04:16

oh yes the stats class exactly and then

play04:18

you learn there software to do it yeah

play04:20

yeah this was this was uh quite some

play04:23

time ago so the the methodology of

play04:25

resources available in business was a

play04:27

little different then but you know and

play04:29

one could make the the argument of why

play04:30

go through the expense the grind the

play04:33

stress you will think of things

play04:35

differently when you're done with your

play04:36

degree and it's true you really can't

play04:38

it's called it's the positive curse of

play04:40

knowledge you really no longer

play04:43

can you know go to a place where you

play04:46

don't know it because you know it now so

play04:47

it's really hard to unthink and unlearn

play04:49

what you what you did you know walking

play04:51

in so the value of degree is is that you

play04:54

will think differently you will see the

play04:55

world in business through a different

play04:58

lens and a different fil

play05:00

and that's valuable to employers that

play05:02

you just may not get from this General

play05:04

business experience that is so true okay

play05:06

I love what you said kind of like the

play05:07

curse of knowledge in a way or the

play05:09

burden of the responsibility I just got

play05:11

this image too of the movie The Village

play05:13

remember where the kids saw like wow

play05:15

there's a whole world Beyond this and

play05:17

you can't unsee it you can't unlearn it

play05:19

and that's what's so wonderful about an

play05:20

education is no one can take away from

play05:22

you a well-earned degree of value in

play05:25

fact it's funny you said that about the

play05:26

Masters because we just got ranked I

play05:28

think payscale.com Tom did a survey that

play05:31

our graduate students or our graduates

play05:33

of our graduate programs earning the

play05:35

highest within the top 15 in the country

play05:37

of colleges that the graduates earn the

play05:39

most when they finish and you know we

play05:41

know it's not all about money but you do

play05:43

invest in yourself so that you see a

play05:45

return so you see a return for yourself

play05:47

so you see a return for your family for

play05:49

your wealth and that's what's so great

play05:50

about Walsh is we know that you're

play05:52

sacrificing your time your energy your

play05:54

money to come here and we want to make

play05:56

sure that that Roi is there so it's not

play05:58

only there with the degree and the job

play06:01

but like you talked about it's the human

play06:03

being you become in the process you know

play06:05

critical thinking problem solving

play06:07

evaluating an issue from both sides

play06:09

before drawing a conclusion which is the

play06:11

essence of really a learner individual

play06:14

so I love hearing that and it's just

play06:15

it's great to hear that you had that

play06:17

experience too and that you saw that

play06:19

firsthand well said I absolutely agree

play06:22

with everything you said and how you how

play06:23

you said it um the other thing I would

play06:25

add that the degree you talked about

play06:27

return on investment is it had a

play06:29

longtail return on investment so some of

play06:31

the things that I went through and

play06:33

learned about or wrote about or had to

play06:36

do a presentation with a group about a

play06:39

specific topic or subject or angle at

play06:43

something you know the immediate maybe

play06:47

return of that information or or

play06:48

exposure to that or or having to think

play06:51

or write about that I might not applied

play06:53

at the first few years

play06:55

postgraduate

play06:57

degree but nine 10 years later something

play07:00

similar came up and I said oh I remember

play07:02

that yeah or there was a specific issue

play07:05

going on politically and we had talked

play07:07

about it a few years prior in in in a in

play07:09

a group project in ethics class at Walsh

play07:12

college and and who would have thought

play07:14

that those would intertwin so and I also

play07:17

found it really improved my writing

play07:18

skills again we talked about technology

play07:20

difference so we have different with AI

play07:22

and the language support tools they have

play07:25

out there langage support tools right I

play07:27

know Walsh has a detection on on the use

play07:31

of AI wording and WR and their papers is

play07:34

that correct yeah so there is a software

play07:36

called turn it in and it's well it's

play07:38

it's supposed to help to make sure that

play07:39

students are contributing their own work

play07:41

but it actually uses an AI tool to do

play07:43

that which is so funny but yes no I know

play07:45

what you're saying we have much more

play07:46

technology now to actually support

play07:48

writers but you still have to learn the

play07:50

communication skill of writing and I

play07:52

love when you talked about that right so

play07:54

it those skill sets that that investment

play07:57

return has continued to re

play08:00

benefits mult multiple years I mean even

play08:03

decades after completing my Master's

play08:05

Degree it's like it pays dividends at an

play08:07

ongoing basis you know learning

play08:09

compounds so you're absolutely right you

play08:10

might learn something you don't use it

play08:12

right away because it's not necessarily

play08:13

transactional knowledge it's

play08:15

transformational knowledge it actually

play08:17

transforms the way you think so that you

play08:20

see later wow I'm actually communicating

play08:22

differently I'm actually writing this

play08:24

differently because of what I learned or

play08:25

I'm thinking about something I love that

play08:27

I mean that is the that's the return on

play08:29

that investment over time it pays you

play08:32

know Nord dividends so one thing I want

play08:35

to talk about too is so your journey

play08:37

professionally now you have a master of

play08:38

science and management you got that in

play08:40

our graduate program how have you seen

play08:42

that play out as youve worked through

play08:44

and I know you work in the insurance

play08:45

agent business and you're a senior vice

play08:47

president at cap neck and you know it's

play08:49

so exciting that you get to work with

play08:50

clients as well because you know when

play08:52

people are coming to you for insurance

play08:54

needs first of all we know it's always

play08:55

an expense they're always wondering do

play08:57

they have to pay for like is this really

play08:58

an expense I need but most of the time

play09:01

when folks have a problem they have a

play09:02

claim you know that's not the best time

play09:04

in their life so have your skills that

play09:06

you learned in the management program

play09:08

with leadership and communication do you

play09:10

see those coming to Bear when you're

play09:11

working with your

play09:12

clients absolutely that's a great great

play09:15

tie into what we were talking about the

play09:17

with the longtail return on education it

play09:19

really is problem solving you had

play09:20

mentioned that before it is a form of

play09:23

business problem solving insurance for

play09:25

businesses is a is a form of financing

play09:27

so some of your Finance skills

play09:29

it's a way to pay for risk in issues and

play09:32

unforeseen events it's also a way to

play09:35

hedge certain risk factors you know

play09:38

might be out there so that you can take

play09:40

that business risk and and maybe make

play09:42

that investment or take that product

play09:45

line to Market or whatever it may be so

play09:48

the communication skills you talked

play09:49

about in reference and be able to put

play09:51

that together and understand how this

play09:53

may fit a value proposition and how to

play09:56

structure this financially where it

play09:58

makes sense and you mentioned something

play10:00

about expense or them not liking it uh

play10:02

it it usually falls on the lower scale

play10:05

of fund to work with with most people

play10:08

yeah it's not like going shopping yeah

play10:10

um but it is something that is necessary

play10:13

to kind of facilitate and provide that

play10:14

liquidity of that risk that's inherit in

play10:17

business and so it is right now a

play10:19

function of of of making sure business

play10:21

gets done and there's a financial

play10:23

recourse available if something does go

play10:25

wrong unexpectedly yes so it it does

play10:28

play so the education has allowed all

play10:31

aspects of that so you talked about the

play10:33

degree itself I use communication I use

play10:35

the financing piece I use the

play10:36

presentation piece you learn all the

play10:38

communication skills necessary to

play10:40

interact with both sides not just the

play10:42

clients that I interact with but the

play10:44

insurance companies themselves oh yeah

play10:47

so I I I sit as an adviser agent broker

play10:50

and so I'm you know in the middle so to

play10:52

speak so I have to understand the needs

play10:54

and of the client base and what we're

play10:56

trying to solve and the budget we got to

play10:58

work up within and then I also got to

play11:00

work with the insurance companies to get

play11:02

them comfortable with the risk for them

play11:04

to to offer the terms we need to to

play11:07

negotiate wow and to do things they may

play11:09

not want to do and it's so all the skill

play11:12

sets that I learned uh through life but

play11:15

a lot at Walsh and through the Master's

play11:17

Degree have been very valuable executing

play11:20

some of those outcomes yeah it's really

play11:22

navigating various constituents

play11:24

differently because again how you're

play11:25

working with the insurance companies is

play11:26

different than how you're working with

play11:27

the clients and how you're communicating

play11:29

all this and you had to go back and

play11:30

forth and they're looking at you to give

play11:31

them the answers and you know you're

play11:33

having to navigate that so that's really

play11:35

great the other thing I think about is

play11:37

it really is a great Testament to you as

play11:39

a leader to want to help the client

play11:41

first you know a lot of times in

play11:42

business business can get a different

play11:44

wrap people can say oh it's all about

play11:46

the money especially in insurance but I

play11:48

know you and you know not only are you a

play11:49

board member but you've been a great

play11:51

adviser to Walsh College when we've had

play11:53

questions about insurance which is a

play11:55

huge benefit to have board members who

play11:56

are experts in their field you've been

play11:58

able to lean in taking a look at our

play12:00

policy advising us on risk saying okay

play12:03

here's what really happens when this

play12:04

comes about and that is your level of

play12:06

expertise because you've been in the

play12:07

insurance business now what almost 15

play12:09

years 14 years 18 18 years oh my

play12:12

goodness how time flies yeah so 18 years

play12:14

so the level of expertise you bring

play12:16

you've seen so much happen and there's

play12:18

no substitute for that type of knowledge

play12:20

either and that's why it's so great to

play12:22

have you on our board and also as a

play12:24

resource for our students because I know

play12:25

you've talked to a couple of our

play12:26

students before that have been curious

play12:28

about the insurance industry or curious

play12:30

about careers and how to pick one and

play12:32

you know you just put that time in to

play12:34

learn that and I I think that's just

play12:35

really great kabnick is very fortunate

play12:37

to have someone who has that level of

play12:39

expertise but also has the focus on

play12:41

helping the client because that's how

play12:43

you get other clients you know clients

play12:45

talk and they tell their friends and

play12:46

their family I work with so and so this

play12:48

is somebody you can trust and because of

play12:51

that endorsement people will do business

play12:52

with you so I think that's great and

play12:54

that's just a great Testament to Walsh

play12:55

College alumni but let's go into that a

play12:57

little bit more too so talk about your

play12:59

approach to when you work with clients

play13:01

with insurance The Client First approach

play13:03

I'd love to hear more about that well

play13:04

first of all thank you for that that

play13:06

that compliment it's my pleasure and

play13:07

honor to be able to serve Walsh on the

play13:09

board and to be able to help students in

play13:11

alumni alike so I appreciate the

play13:13

opportunity you afford for that in terms

play13:15

of the question of approaching with

play13:17

clients it really is Client First it

play13:19

really is understanding what's important

play13:21

to them what their needs are what their

play13:22

risk are and and what potential problems

play13:25

may be there or what problem is there

play13:27

that needs to be solved I I don't need

play13:29

to create problems for people we don't

play13:31

need to create extra work we all know

play13:32

how much everyone has to do so it really

play13:35

is a problem solving Adventure or

play13:37

Venture that that I would engage with

play13:39

any any client or potential client so it

play13:41

is about what is the issue at hand or

play13:43

issues and is there are there pragmatic

play13:46

solutions that we can bring are there

play13:47

new ideas or new ways to look at this to

play13:50

help fix that and put it in a better

play13:51

spot than when I found it yeah and I

play13:53

love how you stay on top of the latest

play13:55

trends in the field I know you were just

play13:57

featured in the insurance Indemnity uh

play14:00

new publication of the State Bar of

play14:01

Michigan they asked you to write an

play14:03

article about insurance specifically

play14:04

cyber insurance which is a growing area

play14:06

that we're seeing but also talk a little

play14:08

bit about I know I know so at cck you

play14:10

guys did this great thing where you did

play14:12

a behavioral assessment and you looked

play14:13

at qualities of how you lead and how you

play14:15

communicate and what did you learn from

play14:17

that and talk about your decision to

play14:19

share that so openly on your website

play14:21

profile because I remember I saw that

play14:23

and I thought this is amazing I would

play14:24

want to work with somebody that is

play14:26

willing to share this that is so brave

play14:27

to say hey here are my communication

play14:29

strengths here's where I tend to lean

play14:31

behaviorally here's how I communicate

play14:33

here's how I lead and I want my clients

play14:35

to know that so they know me and they

play14:37

know who they're working with yeah

play14:39

thanks for that there's a lot there I I

play14:41

think you know this still is a a human

play14:43

to human business is a people business

play14:46

people work for people so we use those

play14:48

assessments to help internally to help

play14:50

understand working with our teammates

play14:52

yeah you know what best communication

play14:54

Styles work what what are Tendencies and

play14:56

behaviors and how do how do we harmonize

play14:58

that how do we do that best and and how

play15:01

does someone need to see information

play15:02

when do they need to see it but it also

play15:05

it really works with with clients

play15:06

because again it's it's People to People

play15:08

it and and I think you had something

play15:11

said something earlier about insurance

play15:13

and just what people might think about

play15:14

it and there's a a generally negative

play15:19

perception about insurance at least I

play15:21

had that when I was first approached

play15:22

about entering the

play15:23

industry it was a hard no it was a hard

play15:27

no but I didn't understand the full

play15:29

aspect of it and that's a whole

play15:31

different

play15:32

conversation but I think that perception

play15:34

exists for a reason and uh and the

play15:37

reason I wanted to share with clients to

play15:39

to full bring full circle to your to

play15:41

your question or point is you know I

play15:44

want them to see what's how I operate

play15:46

what's important to me what are my

play15:48

Tendencies and in in in there is that

play15:51

I'm you know happen to be very cautious

play15:54

I want things to be proven to be the

play15:57

right thing before we just take take a a

play16:00

full swing at this you know put

play16:02

everything at it and maybe shift all our

play16:05

resources towards this idea if we don't

play16:06

know if it's true so that I want clients

play16:10

to see that there could be times where

play16:12

I'm not the type of Personality that

play16:14

they need or want or it would be I might

play16:17

be the right compliment for whatever the

play16:19

risk tolerance is whatever it is the

play16:21

goals are of the organizations around

play16:23

risk management around insurance so I

play16:25

felt it was great to be as transparent

play16:27

so people knew I was coming from but

play16:29

also on this negative connotation thing

play16:31

that I kind of

play16:33

started is to help kind of alleviate

play16:36

that some that it's not this scam or

play16:41

this ripoff although there are

play16:42

frustrating aspects don't get me wrong

play16:44

my business is very frustrating I I'm

play16:46

sure a lot of people has their have

play16:48

their own War Stories within their own

play16:50

Industries um but it it isn't Brian

play16:54

first you had mentioned clients first

play16:56

this isn't if you and it's not

play16:58

necessarily Brian seeing this from a

play17:00

sales pitch type of way it really is

play17:03

read the report this is how I'm wired

play17:06

this is how it's hardwired this is how

play17:08

it's been nurtured in me my experiences

play17:10

have have really shaped me to be this

play17:13

type of professional this type of

play17:15

advisor and if you look in there one of

play17:17

the key words that I took away from this

play17:20

and it helped me understand myself

play17:21

better and my approach to clients is

play17:23

this Duty I feel this and which is an

play17:26

interesting word I know you have a legal

play17:28

background it's a very legal term it is

play17:30

a legal term yes so this Duty and it

play17:33

helps explain a lot so again back why

play17:36

I'm bringing all this up is it really is

play17:38

to give clients Choice transparency on

play17:40

you what the motivations are and and

play17:43

where we're trying to go and how I

play17:45

approach things yeah I love that so so

play17:46

many things you said I want to highlight

play17:48

to one is the sense of Duty and

play17:50

responsibility so thinking about this

play17:51

from a client standpoint if I'm coming

play17:53

to an insurance agent I want to know

play17:55

that they're going to approach things

play17:56

cautiously so that's actually good but

play17:58

but sometimes that's helpful to know by

play18:00

the way if I recommend this product or

play18:02

if I say have you thought about it this

play18:04

way that isn't me trying to sell it to

play18:05

you that's me with an eye looking out

play18:08

for your business because I feel I have

play18:10

a duty to you to tell you I've seen this

play18:12

happen before it may not have happened

play18:14

to you yet so it doesn't feel like it

play18:16

could because everybody's like oh what

play18:17

are the odds and it is an odds game and

play18:19

and hopefully by and large most people

play18:21

won't even need to activate the

play18:22

insurance it's there if you need it but

play18:24

hopefully you don't need it although the

play18:26

double-edged sword then is but then I've

play18:27

paid for it I always think that's just a

play18:29

cost of doing business you know that's

play18:30

just something that comes along like

play18:32

you've said as peace of mind so you can

play18:33

sleep at night knowing what I have

play18:35

worked so hard for all these years all

play18:37

that time and sweat and effort I'm not

play18:39

going to lose because of One financial

play18:42

event because of a fire because of a

play18:44

flood something like that but the other

play18:46

piece of it I think is important is you

play18:48

and I were talking about this in terms

play18:49

of so I may not approach things from a

play18:52

sense of caution I mean I'm always

play18:53

thinking about what's the worst that can

play18:54

happen but I tend to look at the

play18:56

opportunities and the events and like

play18:57

what can we do here which is great

play18:59

except that sometimes when we were

play19:01

communicating even in the board level I

play19:02

would think oh he doesn't think this is

play19:04

a good idea or he doesn't trust that we

play19:07

can execute this and you're thinking I

play19:09

just want to make sure we've looked at

play19:10

all Alternatives so the reason that's so

play19:13

helpful is many times we filter the

play19:15

world through the way that we would

play19:17

react if we were in that person's shoes

play19:19

and so for example using me as an

play19:21

example I might say well if I reacted

play19:22

that way I'd be thinking all these

play19:23

things and you're going no I'm actually

play19:25

thinking this right so I love that

play19:27

because that really brings that person

play19:29

that human element to insurance I know

play19:31

we talk about Ai and machine learning

play19:32

being big and emerging however when it

play19:35

comes down to dealing with humans that

play19:36

are in real life situations that are

play19:39

scared that are afraid that are nervous

play19:41

that are anxious that are angry that

play19:42

have emotions human beings are best

play19:45

equipped to do that and that's where

play19:47

having that human being at the other end

play19:48

of the phone when someone calls and says

play19:51

you're never going to believe what

play19:52

happened what do I do is so important

play19:54

because you can reassure them and say

play19:56

great here's how we're going to work

play19:57

this through right no was hurt if

play19:59

someone's hurt I'm so sorry here's how

play20:01

I'm going to help you and I think that's

play20:02

really really important and that's the

play20:03

human side of business that we love to

play20:06

talk about at Walsh because we want to

play20:07

see our students and our alumni living

play20:09

our mission in the world and making such

play20:11

a positive

play20:12

contribution well said I don't have much

play20:14

to add to that well let's add this so if

play20:16

you were talking to a student a

play20:18

prospective student someone let's say

play20:19

that's interested in a graduate degree

play20:21

because there's a lot of talk nowadays

play20:22

about okay I have an undergrad I've

play20:24

talked a lot of alumni that say I don't

play20:26

think I want to go back to school did

play20:27

you find that graduate school was

play20:29

different than undergrad and if so how

play20:32

great question I did I I found graduate

play20:36

school one I was different so my

play20:38

experiences were different so when I was

play20:40

completing my undergrad so it's a

play20:41

compare contrast type of answer what was

play20:44

it like for my undergrad what was it

play20:46

like through my graduate The Graduate I

play20:48

was young I didn't have a lot of life

play20:50

experience I was just figuring the world

play20:53

out and I was growing up still I still

play20:56

maturing and and and all those different

play20:58

things so so the the information and the

play21:00

academic

play21:02

information but I I saw it one way and I

play21:04

don't know if I truly understood it I

play21:06

did well I I scored well I graduated

play21:09

with with the Honors that you would

play21:10

expect if you put work towards it but

play21:13

when I approached it when I started my

play21:15

AC my Graduate Studies excuse me the

play21:17

information looked different to me yeah

play21:19

some of the information I felt like am I

play21:21

relearning my

play21:23

undergrad but then I really as I think

play21:25

back on it reflect I actually was

play21:27

learning it for the first time the

play21:28

information some of it might have

play21:30

overlapped not all of it not saying it's

play21:33

just a complete repeat but I saw things

play21:35

differently I had different experiences

play21:38

and I think every student that takes

play21:40

that on for for a graduate degree that

play21:42

has a little bit of professional

play21:44

experience or they're looking at it for

play21:45

their first time as maybe a somebody in

play21:47

their 30s or 40s maybe they haven't been

play21:50

in the workforce and they're using this

play21:51

as a as a way to get in the information

play21:54

will look different because they're

play21:56

different and therefore the experience

play21:57

is atire different entirely different

play21:59

the whole way through oh I love that

play22:00

because we do we filter the world

play22:02

through our experiences and we actually

play22:04

you know it's kind of like sometimes

play22:05

you'll watch a movie twice or three

play22:06

times or you read a book and you think

play22:07

I'm picking up so much more the second

play22:09

and third time through because that

play22:11

repetition and deepening that knowledge

play22:13

as well especially in business you know

play22:15

sometimes when you if you have a

play22:16

business undergrad I've heard from a lot

play22:17

of students that yeah their graduate

play22:19

work they felt it was familiar they were

play22:20

able to build on it they were able to go

play22:22

deeper they were able to go to the

play22:24

applied standpoint from it but what I

play22:26

liked too is thinking you know our

play22:28

program you can do one class at a time

play22:30

so an undergrad I don't know what yours

play22:31

was like but I had like four or five

play22:32

classes going on at once and I was like

play22:34

oh did I do I read this is it is it this

play22:36

is it history is it you know whereas now

play22:38

you can really hone in and focus on your

play22:40

area and I know some of our students

play22:42

have said that's really great it doesn't

play22:43

feel as chaotic or as cumbersome as

play22:46

undergrad even though it's a higher

play22:47

level of study and I think that's

play22:49

exactly what you're saying is you're

play22:50

able to learn it at a much deeper and

play22:52

more synthesizing level than maybe at

play22:54

the didactic level that we had at

play22:56

undergrad and that's what's so great

play22:57

about a grad degree is that allows you

play22:59

to get that level of specialty so in

play23:01

this world of AI and machine learning

play23:03

and automation when a lot of the jobs

play23:05

that you know they might be very

play23:06

valuable jobs but a company might decide

play23:08

look I can get a machine to do this

play23:10

faster I'm not saying better but faster

play23:13

and I don't have to pay a person to do

play23:15

it I can make a one-time investment in a

play23:16

machine we may see companies go that way

play23:19

for cost whereas those that have that

play23:21

Advanced Training that knowledge that

play23:23

leadership that ability to have

play23:25

leadership communication those are going

play23:27

to be the folks that are going to get

play23:28

promoted and that are going to lead and

play23:30

that are going to secure their future

play23:31

and that's why we're so proud of that at

play23:33

Walsh because we are seeing our leaders

play23:34

out there and doing that so also you

play23:36

brought up a good point I you had asked

play23:38

about it might not hit this point the

play23:41

way to the PACE that you can take the

play23:43

education in at Walsh specifically was

play23:46

one of the main attractions to to to me

play23:48

finally choosing Walsh as a school for

play23:51

my for my graduate degree the four

play23:54

semesters yeah the four 11 is 11 and a

play23:57

halfish weeks right right 11 and a

play23:59

halfish yeah 11 one's 11 one's 12 weeks

play24:01

and the 10 to 11 everybody's like what

play24:04

is that 11 week that 11th week is really

play24:06

the final project the presentation but

play24:07

students do say oh it's nice to have

play24:09

that 11th week yeah I could break it up

play24:11

because what you're describing in

play24:12

undergrad is what I felt too which is I

play24:14

had four five six classes I was carrying

play24:16

it was a lot to to complete everything I

play24:18

needed to do it was stressful and I

play24:19

don't know how much I retained it was it

play24:21

was really kind of I was able to space

play24:23

it out so I was paying for my graduate

play24:25

out of pocket and I needed the pace the

play24:27

space out and to Pace it so I could one

play24:30

accomplish it in a way I was working

play24:32

full-time I needed a cost Pace out too I

play24:35

needed to be able to pay class by class

play24:37

I needed to be able to take the time to

play24:39

get through it so the four semesters

play24:41

allowed me to achieve what you were

play24:43

talking about a little more depth and

play24:45

just a better Cadence for me that worked

play24:47

for my learning style given what was

play24:49

going on in my life I was trying to

play24:51

accomplish it yeah and we have heard

play24:52

that from a lot of students what's

play24:53

really nice is a lot of our students

play24:55

don't graduate with a lot of debt I mean

play24:57

they have some but they don't have as as

play24:58

much as you would see if you spent that

play25:00

time just studying or in the four and

play25:01

five classes remember when finals week

play25:03

would come along you're like oh I got a

play25:04

final every day this week right and with

play25:06

this it's like oh I can take one I can

play25:08

take two so it's a much better pace for

play25:10

our students I think that's great what

play25:12

professional advice would you give like

play25:13

if you could go back in a DeLorean time

play25:15

machine for those of us that are old

play25:17

enough to know what the DeLorean is if

play25:18

you were to go back in time what would

play25:20

you tell someone at your point in your

play25:22

career maybe right before you got into

play25:24

Graduate Studies at Walsh or even before

play25:26

then that you wish you knew today or you

play25:29

wish you knew that I think I think an

play25:31

advantage that people I think they fail

play25:34

to recognize and it's just part of the

play25:36

human curse condition is the the the

play25:40

latitude that they have because of their

play25:42

age the youth they younger you are the

play25:45

more risk you can take I think I was my

play25:49

own personal experience and filter it it

play25:51

comes out in the personality report you

play25:53

were talking about that I have on on

play25:54

that site uh I was more risk adverse oh

play25:58

I think my advice would be take more

play26:01

risk MH take that extra leap so we're

play26:04

talking a lot about Walsh and education

play26:06

and enrolling on a graduate degree some

play26:08

people are intimidated by biting that

play26:11

off or committing to that so that I've

play26:14

categorized that maybe that's a big risk

play26:16

I don't know if I can there's a little

play26:17

bit of fear behind that a little

play26:19

trepidation sure I would say especially

play26:22

you know earlier on that that is an

play26:23

advantage that you lose over time and

play26:26

then that's what people looking back

play26:27

when they're learing time machine saying

play26:29

I wish I would have done X Y and Z I

play26:31

think that regret is not understanding

play26:34

the value of time that you have right

play26:35

now and in front of you that that's one

play26:38

level of just personal advice from

play26:40

professional advice it is the the

play26:43

traditional cliche terms they're cliche

play26:45

for a

play26:46

reason and because they are true and

play26:49

they remain to be true is invest in

play26:50

yourself put yourself

play26:53

first invest early do those minor basic

play26:58

not very exciting things doing those

play27:01

consistently as early on as possible

play27:03

would would put you in such a great

play27:05

position yeah a decade or two later yeah

play27:09

because it compounds like all of that

play27:11

compounds like you said I think that's

play27:12

so perfect and you're someone that does

play27:13

that I know you're always sending me

play27:14

books that you're reading or you're

play27:16

auding or podcasts and so I just think

play27:18

that's so great because when I think

play27:19

about people I want to do business with

play27:20

I want to do business with the people

play27:22

that love what they're doing that feel a

play27:24

sense of Duty and responsibility that

play27:26

actually approach it's so funny maybe

play27:28

that's part of how you got into

play27:29

insurance is there was a part of you

play27:31

that said I want to be able to do this

play27:33

for somebody else I want to be able to

play27:35

have a sense of Duty and responsibility

play27:37

for companies and businesses bigger than

play27:39

myself and I want to be able to do that

play27:40

in a way that looks out for them even

play27:42

though they may not see the risk I want

play27:44

to help them with that so that's just so

play27:45

great and then someone that invests in

play27:47

themselves in their training you're

play27:49

actually dead on and and ultimately why

play27:51

I said earlier I said a hard no when I

play27:53

first was approached and you know the

play27:55

consideration of it and I had a lack of

play27:57

understanding but once I understood

play27:59

especially the commercial aspect of the

play28:01

insurance the whole industry how it

play28:04

works my role others roles once I

play28:06

understood that it was two things it was

play28:09

the ability to form these relationships

play28:11

with people meaningful structured where

play28:13

we're doing things together to help each

play28:15

other that was very important to me they

play28:17

gave me a lot of personal

play28:19

satisfaction it it helps drive me Y and

play28:22

and second was the technical aspect of

play28:24

insurance it is contract there are

play28:26

various scenarios to consider there are

play28:28

things are always changing dynamically

play28:30

and so that continued push to have to

play28:33

learn to get deeper technical knowledge

play28:36

was something I always wanted to keep in

play28:37

my professional setting it also drives

play28:40

and gives me satisfaction and

play28:42

professionally speaking as well so those

play28:44

were the two reasons now you talk about

play28:45

Duty and

play28:46

responsibility I have a client said to

play28:48

me one time I want somebody that works

play28:51

for me as my agent and your advisor I

play28:54

want somebody worried at night up at

play28:55

night worried about my program I want

play28:57

them to care and I was up last night

play28:59

worried about some of's program so it's

play29:01

great I mean it's people get that with

play29:03

me and it it has to go back to that

play29:05

sense of Duty and responsibility and I

play29:07

and I ABS I just care I want to do it

play29:09

right I want the best outcome I I tell

play29:11

talk about potential clients we said

play29:12

about earlier if if we can't do it right

play29:16

if I can't do it right we're not going

play29:17

to do it at all it it only should be

play29:19

done right and so that's that's how we

play29:21

approaching just kind of tie that all

play29:24

together both the duty the technical and

play29:27

then doing it for others it's got to be

play29:29

done right or we're just not going to do

play29:30

it it's not worth it it's not worth it

play29:31

to them it's not worth it to us yeah and

play29:33

this is how you move through the world

play29:34

like I just want to highlight that and

play29:35

really commend you because this isn't

play29:37

just like your sales pitch for business

play29:39

this is actually how you operate it's

play29:40

how you operate as an Alum as a friend

play29:43

as a board member as a colleague as a

play29:45

professional and you know it's like this

play29:46

is amazing to find a person you can do

play29:49

business with that actually operates in

play29:50

a way for their own like their own

play29:52

standards you know you have your own way

play29:54

of showing up that happens to align so

play29:56

well with the clients and that's what's

play29:57

so important but even that knowledge

play29:59

that technical expertise insurance is

play30:00

changing so quickly I mean obviously my

play30:02

background in law I'm seeing it all the

play30:04

time in the bar Journal oh that you know

play30:06

this got repealed or this new

play30:07

legislation came out with Michigan and

play30:09

you have to stay on top of that and if

play30:11

you get agents that are saying you know

play30:12

what I'm at the end of my career I don't

play30:14

know if I really want to brush up on

play30:15

that I'll just kind of go back and defer

play30:17

to somebody else you could miss

play30:19

something really important for your

play30:20

client and you take that very seriously

play30:22

that sense of Duty that sense of

play30:24

responsibility and that sense of

play30:25

connection so in a lot of ways it might

play30:27

be boy you know this really is your

play30:30

superpower and the way that you show up

play30:32

for clients and you know we talk a lot

play30:34

in life too about decision points you

play30:35

know you talked about well I was looking

play30:37

to come to Walsh I could have gone here

play30:39

I look at you and I think you would have

play30:40

been successful no matter what happened

play30:42

no matter where you went and no matter

play30:44

I'm glad you came to Walsh but no matter

play30:46

where you went no matter what no matter

play30:48

what you know career you chose and also

play30:50

no matter what company you worked for

play30:52

because the essence of how you show up

play30:54

for clients and the work you do isn't

play30:56

dependent on that it's truly dependent

play30:58

on your own standards in fact I think it

play31:00

was Tom Brady that said keep your own

play31:02

scorecard because there was one time I

play31:03

think the Patriots might have won a game

play31:05

and then they were all excited and happy

play31:06

and he's like no we we didn't do all

play31:08

these things right even though we might

play31:09

have beat this team we need to keep our

play31:11

own scorecard and that's how you move

play31:13

through the world and I think that's

play31:14

exceptional because that sets you up

play31:15

kind of as a Renaissance person no

play31:17

matter where you are in life no matter

play31:19

what situation you're deposited in you

play31:21

will figure it out you may not always

play31:22

feel you'll figure it out but you will

play31:24

figure it out I wish I had that com

play31:26

thank you for all that and you're being

play31:27

very comment I appreciate that but I've

play31:29

seen it too like that's the nice thing

play31:30

is we never see this in ourselves we

play31:32

only see it in others and then it's up

play31:33

to us to say okay what is it that I'm

play31:35

not seeing you know and you're really

play31:36

good about that so so there are multiple

play31:39

people that have helped provide that as

play31:41

a guide post as Mentor roles or people

play31:45

I'm around another piece of advice as

play31:47

I'm thinking of things from that

play31:48

question earlier is who are you around

play31:52

who who you're spending time with who

play31:53

you looking up to who you seeking advice

play31:55

from what are they doing are you

play31:57

modeling or stud people that are in a

play31:59

position that you might want to be and

play32:01

and and find out learn from them ask and

play32:03

and so I'm around you a lot and we get a

play32:05

chance to have a great relationship and

play32:08

you're being humble on how much your

play32:10

thirst for knowledge and how fast you

play32:12

can process things how many degrees and

play32:14

certifications you have and and I do get

play32:17

that rubs off on me because my exposure

play32:19

to you you have a lot that you share

play32:22

with a lot of people and I always talk

play32:24

about this in in a joking but also a

play32:26

very true way the level of commitment

play32:30

you bring to learning level commitment

play32:32

you bring to Walsh the energy you bring

play32:36

is 247 it is 247 so I'm inspired by that

play32:41

and I do think I have been fortunate

play32:43

enough to be around others that have

play32:46

also embodied that and I've learned from

play32:48

that and modeled that and I've luckily

play32:50

wanted to be that a different points in

play32:52

my life I maybe wasn't sure if I wanted

play32:54

to be cuz sometimes it's hard yeah it

play32:56

doesn't always feel like it's always

play32:58

going to work out and most of the time

play32:59

it doesn't feel like it's going to yeah

play33:02

so so true the mentors and the people

play33:04

you're around and the people I happen to

play33:06

be in my Orbit whether I consciously

play33:08

know it or not are influencing how I

play33:10

look at a situation maybe do I do the

play33:12

extra thing do I look at that deeper

play33:14

technical dive and the people I'm around

play33:17

right now fortunately are doing that and

play33:19

then someon I have to just keep up that

play33:21

is awesome Brian well first of all thank

play33:22

you so much for your kind words it's an

play33:23

absolute privilege and it's easy with

play33:25

Walsh because I love Walsh college so I

play33:26

mean it it sounds like it's a but 24/7 I

play33:28

mean I think about it all the time so I

play33:30

love that but you know you highlighted

play33:31

something really important is not only I

play33:33

think are you putting yourself in the

play33:35

position to be around an environment and

play33:37

people who you want to you know emulate

play33:40

and but you're becoming that for others

play33:41

too and you're kind of seeing that right

play33:43

like having you're you're at the

play33:44

position where I'm sure people are

play33:45

coming to you at the job at cabin saying

play33:47

hey you know can I get your feedback on

play33:49

this can I get your input they're

play33:50

looking at you as that expert which

play33:51

creates a sense of responsibility as

play33:53

well cuz now we have to model the very

play33:55

behavior that we before were kind of

play33:57

learning training up on so I agree with

play33:59

you your environment is very important

play34:01

and constantly auditing who you spend

play34:02

your time with it is hard sometimes we

play34:04

had friends and families that we say oh

play34:06

this is this is a person I know I've

play34:08

known them for years but you know what I

play34:10

don't really feel like a better person

play34:11

when I'm around them and those are those

play34:13

decisions what's nice about Walsh is you

play34:15

get that community in connection Even in

play34:17

our hybrid environment you can connect

play34:19

with students on zoom in the classroom

play34:21

you can connect with faculty you did

play34:23

that study abroad I remember you came

play34:24

back so this Brian was a mentor to our

play34:27

study abroad it was incredible how you

play34:28

did this you went on the trip with the

play34:30

students you opened doors for them to

play34:32

meet with companies when they were uh in

play34:34

Europe when they were in England and

play34:35

then it was really great because you

play34:36

guys debriefed at the end and you said

play34:38

this experience was such an amazing fun

play34:41

time that we had together you're in a

play34:43

different country you're learning

play34:44

different things and you were able to

play34:46

have that connection and community that

play34:48

is the essence of the Walsh college

play34:50

experience absolutely agree it gave

play34:52

access to information experiences and

play34:56

people I wouldn't have otherwise had any

play34:58

opportunity

play35:00

to or see you weren't sure you wanted to

play35:02

go you're like oh I don't know if I want

play35:04

to go I've other things that I have to

play35:05

do and it's always like if we do that

play35:06

and we put ourselves in those situations

play35:08

it ends up paying lifetime dividends

play35:10

small sayings that I have that are

play35:12

cliche sayings but most good things that

play35:15

happened to me are on the other side of

play35:16

I didn't want to do it oo right most

play35:19

good things are on the other side of I

play35:20

don't want to that's what I usually say

play35:22

to others because that usually is an

play35:24

indication that might be hard it might

play35:27

be some uncomfortableness there might be

play35:29

something there of a risk I talked about

play35:31

earlier my a little more risk adverse

play35:33

nature and on the other side of that is

play35:35

going to be a a better experience and a

play35:37

better lens to see things through that

play35:39

maybe I don't feel like going through at

play35:41

the time but looking back and my kind of

play35:44

advice again do that I think that's such

play35:46

a high performance hack everything that

play35:48

you want a better outcome is on the

play35:50

other side of oh I don't think I want to

play35:51

do this I don't want to yeah you have

play35:53

another saying I really like and just to

play35:54

speak into it real quick you say

play35:55

networking never not works I love love

play35:57

this say so what does that mean it's

play35:59

similar to what we're talking about

play36:01

putting yourself in these experiences

play36:02

we're talking about going to London and

play36:04

having that opportunity with Walsh and

play36:06

and how that class was facilitated and

play36:08

the instructors we had and the people

play36:09

that came putting yourself out in these

play36:11

situations where there's networking or a

play36:14

social setting or there's a get together

play36:16

for some common cause right it could be

play36:19

a Walsh alumni group it could be a a

play36:22

social cause it sometimes is

play36:24

intimidating and those places can be

play36:26

clicky oh right and and and know so

play36:29

those people all know each other but

play36:31

every time in my own personal experience

play36:33

almost every time if not every time

play36:37

there's been some weird dividend later

play36:40

or some payoff or somehow it all came

play36:42

connected I'm sure a lot more than I

play36:44

consciously can kind of really recount

play36:46

yeah and and so I really especially

play36:49

those in the professional business and

play36:50

they're younger in their career or

play36:52

they're trying to figure out what they

play36:53

want to do or what's next putting

play36:55

yourself in these settings where there's

play36:57

other people around going to these

play36:59

experiences you will meet connections it

play37:02

will work it will somehow come together

play37:05

I know that You' written books about

play37:06

this and you're very mindset driven you

play37:08

I think you have a new book coming out

play37:10

soon that you're working on on Quantum

play37:13

Quantum leadership yeah it's called

play37:15

Quantum lead like Quantum Leap Quantum

play37:17

lead you know right and so you to so

play37:20

that's about all this being related

play37:21

right so networking never not works is

play37:23

is what you're going to prove out in a

play37:25

much more academic in technical way than

play37:28

my little you you've proven it

play37:30

experientially and that's really

play37:32

important too to just make sure that

play37:33

you're in the right rooms with the right

play37:35

people a lot of times people look at

play37:36

highly successful people like yourself

play37:38

and they say oh he just got lucky oh he

play37:39

just stumbled upon this or you think you

play37:42

don't know what I had to go through you

play37:43

don't know the nights I was agonizing on

play37:45

do I go to this event do I not is this

play37:47

the right decision but it's being in the

play37:49

right rooms with the right people that's

play37:51

how people get that Oprah Winfree moment

play37:53

that they're always talking about so

play37:54

that's what's really great all right

play37:56

well thank you so much for joining I

play37:57

really enjoy being able to talk with our

play37:59

alumni our board members our students

play38:01

and especially Brian he has just been

play38:03

such a great supporter of Walsh College

play38:05

he's a great example of our alumni

play38:07

living our mission in the world and if

play38:08

you want to connect with Brian I know

play38:10

he's on LinkedIn and if you go to capni

play38:14

docomo business with cap neck or you

play38:16

want to explore what it is you can check

play38:18

out Brian's Web page you can look at his

play38:20

personality trait site that was really

play38:22

insightful so I know everyone's curious

play38:23

they're going to go check that out now

play38:25

but thank you so much for spending time

play38:26

with us today and our beautiful Creator

play38:28

studio and thank you for all that you do

play38:30

for Walsh College thank you so much

play38:31

Susie thank

play38:33

you

Rate This
★
★
★
★
★

5.0 / 5 (0 votes)

Related Tags
Higher EducationCareer GrowthMaster's JourneyAlumni InsightsBusiness ManagementNetworking AdviceProfessional DevelopmentRisk ManagementInsurance IndustryLeadership Skills